schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Frequency and implications of HIV superinfection

HIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0–7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, whi... Full description

Journal Title: The Lancet Infectious Diseases 2013, Vol.13 (7), p.622-628
Main Author: Redd, Andrew D, PhD
Other Authors: Quinn, Thomas C, Prof , Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
HIV
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 1473-3099
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3752600
title: Frequency and implications of HIV superinfection
format: Article
creator:
  • Redd, Andrew D, PhD
  • Quinn, Thomas C, Prof
  • Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
subjects:
  • antiretroviral
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • double infection
  • dual infection
  • Genotype
  • HIV
  • HIV (Viruses)
  • HIV - classification
  • HIV - genetics
  • HIV - isolation & purification
  • HIV clinical care
  • HIV Infections - drug therapy
  • HIV Infections - virology
  • HIV pathogenesis
  • HIV patients
  • HIV-1
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Human viral diseases
  • Humans
  • Immunodeficiencies
  • Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
  • Immunopathology
  • Incidence
  • Infectious Disease
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medical sciences
  • next generation sequencing
  • re-infection
  • reinfection
  • superinfection
  • Superinfection - epidemiology
  • Viral diseases
  • Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
  • virus diseases
ispartof: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2013, Vol.13 (7), p.622-628
description: HIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0–7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, which can be transmitted by injecting drug use and sexual intercourse. Superinfection might have incidence rates comparable to those of initial HIV infection. Clinicians should encourage safe sexual and injecting drug use practices for HIV-infected patients because superinfection has detrimental effects on clinical outcomes and could pose a concern for large-scale antiretroviral treatment plans. The occurrence of superinfection has implications for vaccine research, since it seems initial HIV infection is not fully protective against a subsequent infection. Additional collaborative research could benefit care of patients and inform future vaccine design.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1473-3099
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1473-3099
  • 1474-4457
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.6581752
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_pubme
recordidTN_cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3752600
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA340596016
sourcerecordidA340596016
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1849t-6fcc2cdc8d5971f176aee9c15b819ddb826c53df4e9556590fdec253e0cf779e3
addsrcrecordideNqFk21r2zAUhc3YWLtuP2EjMAYdLJ1kvVkMOkpZ10LZPuzlq1Ckq1SdI2eW3ZF_v-ska5owCAbbXD_ncHXvcVG8pOSEEirff6NcsTEjWh9T9lYRIuVYPCoOsczHnAv1ePm-Qg6KZznfEkIVJfxpcVAyVUqlq8OCXLTwu4fkFiOb_CjO5nV0totNyqMmjC6vfo5yP4c2pgBuKD8vngRbZ3ixfh4VPy4-fT-_HF9__Xx1fnY9phXX3VgG50rnXeWFVjRQJS2AdlRMKqq9n1SldIL5wEELIYUmwYMrBQPiglIa2FFxuvKd95MZeAepa21t5m2c2XZhGhvN9pcUb8y0uTNMiVISggZfVgbNHJKNLWxpfYLOePD93PwJBidjJkwyGrBLyTRjbGKZ1TQwsMFS6qhDw-N1R22DI8udmcXsoK5tgqbPhnJGKkGpYvtRphjnRFQloq930NumbxOOdqAo55oLuqGmtgaDy2jwzG4wNWcMjbTETCB18h8KLw-z6JoEIWJ9S_DugWDS55gg4y3H6U2Xp7bPeRsXK9y1Tc4thPuRUmKGVJplKs0QOezeLFNpBOpePdzlvepfDBF4swZsdrYOrU0u5g2nBKNSauQ-7DTgYrdMKx401nvb-LhSA-b2LkJrsosYffCYDodxaOJeh9MdB1fHhD9M_QsWkDebM7k0ZGUyeOAmBwfB_gIsfyLb
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1371449451
display
typearticle
titleFrequency and implications of HIV superinfection
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorRedd, Andrew D, PhD ; Quinn, Thomas C, Prof ; Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
creatorcontribRedd, Andrew D, PhD ; Quinn, Thomas C, Prof ; Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
descriptionHIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0–7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, which can be transmitted by injecting drug use and sexual intercourse. Superinfection might have incidence rates comparable to those of initial HIV infection. Clinicians should encourage safe sexual and injecting drug use practices for HIV-infected patients because superinfection has detrimental effects on clinical outcomes and could pose a concern for large-scale antiretroviral treatment plans. The occurrence of superinfection has implications for vaccine research, since it seems initial HIV infection is not fully protective against a subsequent infection. Additional collaborative research could benefit care of patients and inform future vaccine design.
identifier
0ISSN: 1473-3099
1EISSN: 1474-4457
2DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70066-5
3PMID: 23726798
4CODEN: LANCAO
languageeng
publisherLondon: Elsevier Ltd
subjectantiretroviral ; Biological and medical sciences ; double infection ; dual infection ; Genotype ; HIV ; HIV (Viruses) ; HIV - classification ; HIV - genetics ; HIV - isolation & purification ; HIV clinical care ; HIV Infections - drug therapy ; HIV Infections - virology ; HIV pathogenesis ; HIV patients ; HIV-1 ; Human immunodeficiency virus ; Human viral diseases ; Humans ; Immunodeficiencies ; Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies ; Immunopathology ; Incidence ; Infectious Disease ; Infectious Diseases ; Medical sciences ; next generation sequencing ; re-infection ; reinfection ; superinfection ; Superinfection - epidemiology ; Viral diseases ; Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids ; virus diseases
ispartofThe Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2013, Vol.13 (7), p.622-628
rights
0Elsevier Ltd
12013 Elsevier Ltd
22014 INIST-CNRS
3Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
4COPYRIGHT 2013 Elsevier B.V.
5Copyright Elsevier Limited Jul 2013
62013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved 2013
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1849t-6fcc2cdc8d5971f176aee9c15b819ddb826c53df4e9556590fdec253e0cf779e3
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1849t-6fcc2cdc8d5971f176aee9c15b819ddb826c53df4e9556590fdec253e0cf779e3
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink
0$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=27531669$$DView record in Pascal Francis
1$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23726798$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Redd, Andrew D, PhD
1Quinn, Thomas C, Prof
2Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
title
0Frequency and implications of HIV superinfection
1The Lancet Infectious Diseases
addtitleLancet Infect Dis
descriptionHIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0–7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, which can be transmitted by injecting drug use and sexual intercourse. Superinfection might have incidence rates comparable to those of initial HIV infection. Clinicians should encourage safe sexual and injecting drug use practices for HIV-infected patients because superinfection has detrimental effects on clinical outcomes and could pose a concern for large-scale antiretroviral treatment plans. The occurrence of superinfection has implications for vaccine research, since it seems initial HIV infection is not fully protective against a subsequent infection. Additional collaborative research could benefit care of patients and inform future vaccine design.
subject
0antiretroviral
1Biological and medical sciences
2double infection
3dual infection
4Genotype
5HIV
6HIV (Viruses)
7HIV - classification
8HIV - genetics
9HIV - isolation & purification
10HIV clinical care
11HIV Infections - drug therapy
12HIV Infections - virology
13HIV pathogenesis
14HIV patients
15HIV-1
16Human immunodeficiency virus
17Human viral diseases
18Humans
19Immunodeficiencies
20Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
21Immunopathology
22Incidence
23Infectious Disease
24Infectious Diseases
25Medical sciences
26next generation sequencing
27re-infection
28reinfection
29superinfection
30Superinfection - epidemiology
31Viral diseases
32Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
33virus diseases
issn
01473-3099
11474-4457
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
recordtypearticle
recordideNqFk21r2zAUhc3YWLtuP2EjMAYdLJ1kvVkMOkpZ10LZPuzlq1Ckq1SdI2eW3ZF_v-ska5owCAbbXD_ncHXvcVG8pOSEEirff6NcsTEjWh9T9lYRIuVYPCoOsczHnAv1ePm-Qg6KZznfEkIVJfxpcVAyVUqlq8OCXLTwu4fkFiOb_CjO5nV0totNyqMmjC6vfo5yP4c2pgBuKD8vngRbZ3ixfh4VPy4-fT-_HF9__Xx1fnY9phXX3VgG50rnXeWFVjRQJS2AdlRMKqq9n1SldIL5wEELIYUmwYMrBQPiglIa2FFxuvKd95MZeAepa21t5m2c2XZhGhvN9pcUb8y0uTNMiVISggZfVgbNHJKNLWxpfYLOePD93PwJBidjJkwyGrBLyTRjbGKZ1TQwsMFS6qhDw-N1R22DI8udmcXsoK5tgqbPhnJGKkGpYvtRphjnRFQloq930NumbxOOdqAo55oLuqGmtgaDy2jwzG4wNWcMjbTETCB18h8KLw-z6JoEIWJ9S_DugWDS55gg4y3H6U2Xp7bPeRsXK9y1Tc4thPuRUmKGVJplKs0QOezeLFNpBOpePdzlvepfDBF4swZsdrYOrU0u5g2nBKNSauQ-7DTgYrdMKx401nvb-LhSA-b2LkJrsosYffCYDodxaOJeh9MdB1fHhD9M_QsWkDebM7k0ZGUyeOAmBwfB_gIsfyLb
startdate2013
enddate2013
creator
0Redd, Andrew D, PhD
1Quinn, Thomas C, Prof
2Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
general
0Elsevier Ltd
1Lancet Publishing Group
2Elsevier B.V
3Elsevier Limited
4Elsevier BV
scope
06I.
1AAFTH
2IQODW
3CGR
4CUY
5CVF
6ECM
7EIF
8NPM
9AAYXX
10CITATION
11BSHEE
120TZ
133V.
147QL
157RV
167U9
177X7
187XB
1988E
208AO
218C1
228C2
238FI
248FJ
258FK
26ABUWG
27BENPR
28C1K
29FYUFA
30GHDGH
31H94
32K9.
33KB0
34M0S
35M1P
36M7N
37NAPCQ
38PQEST
39PQQKQ
40PQUKI
417X8
42BOBZL
43CLFQK
445PM
sort
creationdate2013
titleFrequency and implications of HIV superinfection
authorRedd, Andrew D, PhD ; Quinn, Thomas C, Prof ; Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1849t-6fcc2cdc8d5971f176aee9c15b819ddb826c53df4e9556590fdec253e0cf779e3
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2013
topic
0antiretroviral
1Biological and medical sciences
2double infection
3dual infection
4Genotype
5HIV
6HIV (Viruses)
7HIV - classification
8HIV - genetics
9HIV - isolation & purification
10HIV clinical care
11HIV Infections - drug therapy
12HIV Infections - virology
13HIV pathogenesis
14HIV patients
15HIV-1
16Human immunodeficiency virus
17Human viral diseases
18Humans
19Immunodeficiencies
20Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
21Immunopathology
22Incidence
23Infectious Disease
24Infectious Diseases
25Medical sciences
26next generation sequencing
27re-infection
28reinfection
29superinfection
30Superinfection - epidemiology
31Viral diseases
32Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
33virus diseases
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Redd, Andrew D, PhD
1Quinn, Thomas C, Prof
2Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
collection
0ScienceDirect Open Access Titles
1Elsevier:ScienceDirect:Open Access
2Pascal-Francis
3Medline
4MEDLINE
5MEDLINE (Ovid)
6MEDLINE
7MEDLINE
8PubMed
9CrossRef
10Academic OneFile (A&I only)
11Pharma and Biotech Premium PRO
12ProQuest Central (Corporate)
13Bacteriology Abstracts (Microbiology B)
14Nursing & Allied Health Database
15Virology and AIDS Abstracts
16Health & Medical Collection
17ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
18Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
19ProQuest Pharma Collection
20Public Health Database
21Lancet Titles
22Hospital Premium Collection
23Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
24ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
25ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
26ProQuest Central
27Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
28Health Research Premium Collection
29Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
30AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts
31ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
32Nursing & Allied Health Database (Alumni Edition)
33Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
34Medical Database
35Algology Mycology and Protozoology Abstracts (Microbiology C)
36Nursing & Allied Health Premium
37ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
38ProQuest One Academic
39ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
40MEDLINE - Academic
41OpenAIRE (Open Access)
42OpenAIRE
43PubMed Central (Full Participant titles)
jtitleThe Lancet Infectious Diseases
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Redd, Andrew D, PhD
1Quinn, Thomas C, Prof
2Tobian, Aaron AR, Dr
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleFrequency and implications of HIV superinfection
jtitleThe Lancet Infectious Diseases
addtitleLancet Infect Dis
date2013
risdate2013
volume13
issue7
spage622
epage628
pages622-628
issn1473-3099
eissn1474-4457
codenLANCAO
abstractHIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0–7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, which can be transmitted by injecting drug use and sexual intercourse. Superinfection might have incidence rates comparable to those of initial HIV infection. Clinicians should encourage safe sexual and injecting drug use practices for HIV-infected patients because superinfection has detrimental effects on clinical outcomes and could pose a concern for large-scale antiretroviral treatment plans. The occurrence of superinfection has implications for vaccine research, since it seems initial HIV infection is not fully protective against a subsequent infection. Additional collaborative research could benefit care of patients and inform future vaccine design.
copLondon
pubElsevier Ltd
pmid23726798
doi10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70066-5
oafree_for_read