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Source of dietary fibre and diverticular disease incidence: a prospective study of UK women

Background Previous prospective studies have found the incidence of intestinal diverticular disease decreased with increasing intakes of dietary fibre, but associations by the fibre source are less well characterised. We assessed these associations in a large UK prospective study of middle-aged wome... Full description

Journal Title: Gut 2014, Vol.63 (9), p.1450-1456
Main Author: Crowe, Francesca L
Other Authors: Balkwill, Angela , Cairns, Benjamin J , Appleby, Paul N , Green, Jane , Reeves, Gillian K , Key, Timothy J , Beral, Valerie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: England: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0017-5749
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24385599
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4145436
title: Source of dietary fibre and diverticular disease incidence: a prospective study of UK women
format: Article
creator:
  • Crowe, Francesca L
  • Balkwill, Angela
  • Cairns, Benjamin J
  • Appleby, Paul N
  • Green, Jane
  • Reeves, Gillian K
  • Key, Timothy J
  • Beral, Valerie
subjects:
  • 1506
  • Aged
  • beverages
  • Colon
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Complications and side effects
  • Constipation
  • Diet
  • Diet Surveys
  • Dietary Fiber
  • dietary fibre
  • Disease
  • diverticular disease
  • Diverticulitis
  • Diverticulitis - epidemiology
  • Diverticulitis - etiology
  • Diverticulitis - prevention & control
  • Diverticulum - epidemiology
  • Diverticulum - etiology
  • Diverticulum - prevention & control
  • Female
  • Fiber in human nutrition
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Food
  • Hospitals
  • Humans
  • Hypotheses
  • Incidence
  • Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology
  • Intestinal Diseases - etiology
  • Intestinal Diseases - prevention & control
  • Middle Aged
  • prospective
  • Prospective Studies
  • Questionnaires
  • Risk
  • Risk factors
  • Solanum tuberosum
  • Studies
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • United Kingdom - epidemiology
  • Womens health
ispartof: Gut, 2014, Vol.63 (9), p.1450-1456
description: Background Previous prospective studies have found the incidence of intestinal diverticular disease decreased with increasing intakes of dietary fibre, but associations by the fibre source are less well characterised. We assessed these associations in a large UK prospective study of middle-aged women. Methods and findings During 6 (SD 1) years follow-up of 690 075 women without known diverticular disease who had not changed their diet in the last 5 years, 17 325 were admitted to hospital or died with diverticular disease. Dietary fibre intake was assessed using a validated 40-item food questionnaire and remeasured 1 year later in 4265 randomly-selected women. Mean total dietary fibre intake at baseline was 13.8 (SD 5.0) g/day, of which 42% came from cereals, 22% from fruits, 19% from vegetables (not potatoes) and 15% from potatoes. The relative risk (95% CI) for diverticular disease per 5 g/day fibre intake was 0.86 (0.84 to 0.88). There was significant heterogeneity by the four main sources of fibre (p
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0017-5749
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0017-5749
  • 1468-3288
url: Link


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titleSource of dietary fibre and diverticular disease incidence: a prospective study of UK women
creatorCrowe, Francesca L ; Balkwill, Angela ; Cairns, Benjamin J ; Appleby, Paul N ; Green, Jane ; Reeves, Gillian K ; Key, Timothy J ; Beral, Valerie
creatorcontribCrowe, Francesca L ; Balkwill, Angela ; Cairns, Benjamin J ; Appleby, Paul N ; Green, Jane ; Reeves, Gillian K ; Key, Timothy J ; Beral, Valerie ; Million Women Study Collaborators
descriptionBackground Previous prospective studies have found the incidence of intestinal diverticular disease decreased with increasing intakes of dietary fibre, but associations by the fibre source are less well characterised. We assessed these associations in a large UK prospective study of middle-aged women. Methods and findings During 6 (SD 1) years follow-up of 690 075 women without known diverticular disease who had not changed their diet in the last 5 years, 17 325 were admitted to hospital or died with diverticular disease. Dietary fibre intake was assessed using a validated 40-item food questionnaire and remeasured 1 year later in 4265 randomly-selected women. Mean total dietary fibre intake at baseline was 13.8 (SD 5.0) g/day, of which 42% came from cereals, 22% from fruits, 19% from vegetables (not potatoes) and 15% from potatoes. The relative risk (95% CI) for diverticular disease per 5 g/day fibre intake was 0.86 (0.84 to 0.88). There was significant heterogeneity by the four main sources of fibre (p<0.0001), with relative risks, adjusted for each of the other sources of dietary fibre of 0.84 (0.81 to 0.88) per 5 g/day for cereal, 0.81 (0.77 to 0.86) per 5 g/day for fruit, 1.03 (0.93 to 1.14) per 5 g/day for vegetable and 1.04 (1.02 to 1.07) per 1 g/day for potato fibre. Conclusions A higher intake of dietary fibre is associated with a reduced risk of diverticular disease. The associations with diverticular disease appear to vary by fibre source, and the reasons for this variation are unclear.
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subject1506 ; Aged ; beverages ; Colon ; Colorectal cancer ; Complications and side effects ; Constipation ; Diet ; Diet Surveys ; Dietary Fiber ; dietary fibre ; Disease ; diverticular disease ; Diverticulitis ; Diverticulitis - epidemiology ; Diverticulitis - etiology ; Diverticulitis - prevention & control ; Diverticulum - epidemiology ; Diverticulum - etiology ; Diverticulum - prevention & control ; Female ; Fiber in human nutrition ; Follow-Up Studies ; Food ; Hospitals ; Humans ; Hypotheses ; Incidence ; Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology ; Intestinal Diseases - etiology ; Intestinal Diseases - prevention & control ; Middle Aged ; prospective ; Prospective Studies ; Questionnaires ; Risk ; Risk factors ; Solanum tuberosum ; Studies ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; United Kingdom - epidemiology ; Womens health
ispartofGut, 2014, Vol.63 (9), p.1450-1456
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2Copyright: 2014 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
3Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions 2014
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1Balkwill, Angela
2Cairns, Benjamin J
3Appleby, Paul N
4Green, Jane
5Reeves, Gillian K
6Key, Timothy J
7Beral, Valerie
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descriptionBackground Previous prospective studies have found the incidence of intestinal diverticular disease decreased with increasing intakes of dietary fibre, but associations by the fibre source are less well characterised. We assessed these associations in a large UK prospective study of middle-aged women. Methods and findings During 6 (SD 1) years follow-up of 690 075 women without known diverticular disease who had not changed their diet in the last 5 years, 17 325 were admitted to hospital or died with diverticular disease. Dietary fibre intake was assessed using a validated 40-item food questionnaire and remeasured 1 year later in 4265 randomly-selected women. Mean total dietary fibre intake at baseline was 13.8 (SD 5.0) g/day, of which 42% came from cereals, 22% from fruits, 19% from vegetables (not potatoes) and 15% from potatoes. The relative risk (95% CI) for diverticular disease per 5 g/day fibre intake was 0.86 (0.84 to 0.88). There was significant heterogeneity by the four main sources of fibre (p<0.0001), with relative risks, adjusted for each of the other sources of dietary fibre of 0.84 (0.81 to 0.88) per 5 g/day for cereal, 0.81 (0.77 to 0.86) per 5 g/day for fruit, 1.03 (0.93 to 1.14) per 5 g/day for vegetable and 1.04 (1.02 to 1.07) per 1 g/day for potato fibre. Conclusions A higher intake of dietary fibre is associated with a reduced risk of diverticular disease. The associations with diverticular disease appear to vary by fibre source, and the reasons for this variation are unclear.
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abstractBackground Previous prospective studies have found the incidence of intestinal diverticular disease decreased with increasing intakes of dietary fibre, but associations by the fibre source are less well characterised. We assessed these associations in a large UK prospective study of middle-aged women. Methods and findings During 6 (SD 1) years follow-up of 690 075 women without known diverticular disease who had not changed their diet in the last 5 years, 17 325 were admitted to hospital or died with diverticular disease. Dietary fibre intake was assessed using a validated 40-item food questionnaire and remeasured 1 year later in 4265 randomly-selected women. Mean total dietary fibre intake at baseline was 13.8 (SD 5.0) g/day, of which 42% came from cereals, 22% from fruits, 19% from vegetables (not potatoes) and 15% from potatoes. The relative risk (95% CI) for diverticular disease per 5 g/day fibre intake was 0.86 (0.84 to 0.88). There was significant heterogeneity by the four main sources of fibre (p<0.0001), with relative risks, adjusted for each of the other sources of dietary fibre of 0.84 (0.81 to 0.88) per 5 g/day for cereal, 0.81 (0.77 to 0.86) per 5 g/day for fruit, 1.03 (0.93 to 1.14) per 5 g/day for vegetable and 1.04 (1.02 to 1.07) per 1 g/day for potato fibre. Conclusions A higher intake of dietary fibre is associated with a reduced risk of diverticular disease. The associations with diverticular disease appear to vary by fibre source, and the reasons for this variation are unclear.
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