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Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality: analysis of Health Survey for England data

Background Governments worldwide recommend daily consumption of fruit and vegetables. We examine whether this benefits health in the general population of England. Methods Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CI for an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, can... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 2014-09, Vol.68 (9), p.856-862
Main Author: Oyebode, Oyinlola
Other Authors: Gordon-Dseagu, Vanessa , Walker, Alice , Mindell, Jennifer S
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group
ID: ISSN: 0143-005X
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4145465
title: Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality: analysis of Health Survey for England data
format: Article
creator:
  • Oyebode, Oyinlola
  • Gordon-Dseagu, Vanessa
  • Walker, Alice
  • Mindell, Jennifer S
subjects:
  • 1506
  • 1612
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Analysis
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood & organ donations
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
  • Cause of Death
  • Causes of
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Consumption
  • Consumption data
  • Death
  • Diet
  • Dried vegetables
  • England
  • England - epidemiology
  • Exercise
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Female
  • Fruit
  • Fruit juices
  • Fruits
  • General aspects
  • Health aspects
  • Health education
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Institutionalization
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Mortality
  • Multiple tumors. Solid tumors. Tumors in childhood (general aspects)
  • Neoplasms - mortality
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrition research
  • Other Topics
  • Patient outcomes
  • Population
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Response rates
  • Risk Factors
  • Social research
  • Statistics
  • Studies
  • Tumors
  • Vegetables
  • Vegetarianism
ispartof: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2014-09, Vol.68 (9), p.856-862
description: Background Governments worldwide recommend daily consumption of fruit and vegetables. We examine whether this benefits health in the general population of England. Methods Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CI for an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality, adjusting for age, sex, social class, education, BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity, in 65 226 participants aged 35+ years in the 2001–2008 Health Surveys for England, annual surveys of nationally representative random samples of the non-institutionalised population of England linked to mortality data (median follow-up: 7.7 years). Results Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR for 7+ portions 0.67 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.78), reference category
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0143-005X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-005X
  • 1470-2738
url: Link


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titleFruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality: analysis of Health Survey for England data
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creatorOyebode, Oyinlola ; Gordon-Dseagu, Vanessa ; Walker, Alice ; Mindell, Jennifer S
creatorcontribOyebode, Oyinlola ; Gordon-Dseagu, Vanessa ; Walker, Alice ; Mindell, Jennifer S
descriptionBackground Governments worldwide recommend daily consumption of fruit and vegetables. We examine whether this benefits health in the general population of England. Methods Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CI for an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality, adjusting for age, sex, social class, education, BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity, in 65 226 participants aged 35+ years in the 2001–2008 Health Surveys for England, annual surveys of nationally representative random samples of the non-institutionalised population of England linked to mortality data (median follow-up: 7.7 years). Results Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR for 7+ portions 0.67 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.78), reference category <1 portion). This association was more pronounced when excluding deaths within a year of baseline (0.58 (0.46 to 0.71)). Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with reduced cancer (0.75 (0.59–0.96)) and cardiovascular mortality (0.69 (0.53 to 0.88)). Vegetables may have a stronger association with mortality than fruit (HR for 2 to 3 portions 0.81 (0.73 to 0.89) and 0.90 (0.82 to 0.98), respectively). Consumption of vegetables (0.85 (0.81 to 0.89) per portion) or salad (0.87 (0.82 to 0.92) per portion) were most protective, while frozen/canned fruit consumption was apparently associated with increased mortality (1.17 (1.07 to 1.28) per portion). Conclusions A robust inverse association exists between fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality, with benefits seen in up to 7+ portions daily. Further investigations into the effects of different types of fruit and vegetables are warranted.
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subject1506 ; 1612 ; Adult ; Aged ; Analysis ; Biological and medical sciences ; Blood & organ donations ; Cancer ; Cardiovascular disease ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality ; Cause of Death ; Causes of ; Cigarette smoking ; Consumption ; Consumption data ; Death ; Diet ; Dried vegetables ; England ; England - epidemiology ; Exercise ; Feeding Behavior ; Female ; Fruit ; Fruit juices ; Fruits ; General aspects ; Health aspects ; Health education ; Health Surveys ; Humans ; Institutionalization ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Mortality ; Multiple tumors. Solid tumors. Tumors in childhood (general aspects) ; Neoplasms - mortality ; Nutrition ; Nutrition research ; Other Topics ; Patient outcomes ; Population ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Response rates ; Risk Factors ; Social research ; Statistics ; Studies ; Tumors ; Vegetables ; Vegetarianism
ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2014-09, Vol.68 (9), p.856-862
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descriptionBackground Governments worldwide recommend daily consumption of fruit and vegetables. We examine whether this benefits health in the general population of England. Methods Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CI for an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality, adjusting for age, sex, social class, education, BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity, in 65 226 participants aged 35+ years in the 2001–2008 Health Surveys for England, annual surveys of nationally representative random samples of the non-institutionalised population of England linked to mortality data (median follow-up: 7.7 years). Results Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR for 7+ portions 0.67 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.78), reference category <1 portion). This association was more pronounced when excluding deaths within a year of baseline (0.58 (0.46 to 0.71)). Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with reduced cancer (0.75 (0.59–0.96)) and cardiovascular mortality (0.69 (0.53 to 0.88)). Vegetables may have a stronger association with mortality than fruit (HR for 2 to 3 portions 0.81 (0.73 to 0.89) and 0.90 (0.82 to 0.98), respectively). Consumption of vegetables (0.85 (0.81 to 0.89) per portion) or salad (0.87 (0.82 to 0.92) per portion) were most protective, while frozen/canned fruit consumption was apparently associated with increased mortality (1.17 (1.07 to 1.28) per portion). Conclusions A robust inverse association exists between fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality, with benefits seen in up to 7+ portions daily. Further investigations into the effects of different types of fruit and vegetables are warranted.
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45Public health. Hygiene
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abstractBackground Governments worldwide recommend daily consumption of fruit and vegetables. We examine whether this benefits health in the general population of England. Methods Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CI for an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality, adjusting for age, sex, social class, education, BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity, in 65 226 participants aged 35+ years in the 2001–2008 Health Surveys for England, annual surveys of nationally representative random samples of the non-institutionalised population of England linked to mortality data (median follow-up: 7.7 years). Results Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR for 7+ portions 0.67 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.78), reference category <1 portion). This association was more pronounced when excluding deaths within a year of baseline (0.58 (0.46 to 0.71)). Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with reduced cancer (0.75 (0.59–0.96)) and cardiovascular mortality (0.69 (0.53 to 0.88)). Vegetables may have a stronger association with mortality than fruit (HR for 2 to 3 portions 0.81 (0.73 to 0.89) and 0.90 (0.82 to 0.98), respectively). Consumption of vegetables (0.85 (0.81 to 0.89) per portion) or salad (0.87 (0.82 to 0.92) per portion) were most protective, while frozen/canned fruit consumption was apparently associated with increased mortality (1.17 (1.07 to 1.28) per portion). Conclusions A robust inverse association exists between fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality, with benefits seen in up to 7+ portions daily. Further investigations into the effects of different types of fruit and vegetables are warranted.
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