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Elevated Serum Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Obese Indicate Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Link Between Healthy and Unhealthy Obesity?

Context: Although obesity can predispose to the metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, not all obese subjects develop MS, hence the need for new indicators of risk for this syndrome. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) correlate with factors involved in the MS, including i... Full description

Journal Title: The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 2015-05, Vol.100 (5), p.1957-1966
Main Author: Uribarri, Jaime
Other Authors: Cai, Weijing , Woodward, Mark , Tripp, Elizabeth , Goldberg, Laurie , Pyzik, Renata , Yee, Kalle , Tansman, Laurie , Chen, Xue , Mani, Venkatesh , Fayad, Zahi A , Vlassara, Helen
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
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Publisher: United States: Endocrine Society
ID: ISSN: 0021-972X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25695886
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4422896
title: Elevated Serum Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Obese Indicate Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Link Between Healthy and Unhealthy Obesity?
format: Article
creator:
  • Uribarri, Jaime
  • Cai, Weijing
  • Woodward, Mark
  • Tripp, Elizabeth
  • Goldberg, Laurie
  • Pyzik, Renata
  • Yee, Kalle
  • Tansman, Laurie
  • Chen, Xue
  • Mani, Venkatesh
  • Fayad, Zahi A
  • Vlassara, Helen
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Aged
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Glycation End Products, Advanced - blood
  • Humans
  • Insulin Resistance
  • Male
  • Metabolic Syndrome - blood
  • Metabolic Syndrome - etiology
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity - blood
  • Obesity - complications
  • Original
  • Original Articles
  • Risk Factors
ispartof: The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 2015-05, Vol.100 (5), p.1957-1966
description: Context: Although obesity can predispose to the metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, not all obese subjects develop MS, hence the need for new indicators of risk for this syndrome. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) correlate with factors involved in the MS, including inflammation and insulin resistance (IR). Because AGEs can be derived from food and are modifiable, it is important to determine whether they are a risk factor for MS. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the association of endogenous and exogenous AGEs with MS criteria. Design: The following data were collected in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without the MS: serum AGEs (sAGEs) and mononuclear cell AGEs, metabolites, pro- and antiinflammatory markers, body fat mass measures, including abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and caloric and dietary AGE (dAGE) consumption. Setting: The study was conducted in the general community. Participants: Participants included 130 MS and 139 non-MS subjects of both sexes, older than 50 years. Results: sAGEs (ϵN-carboxymethyllysine, methylglyoxal) were markedly elevated in obese persons with more than one other MS criteria but not in obese without MS criteria. sAGEs directly correlated with markers of IR (HOMA) and inflammation (leptin, TNFα, RAGE) and inversely with innate defenses (SIRT1, AGE receptor 1 [AGER1], glyoxalase-I, adiponectin). sAGEs correlated with dAGEs but not with calories, nutrient consumption, or fat mass measures. Consumption of dAGE, but not of calories, was markedly higher in MS than in non-MS. Conclusion: High sAGEs, a modifiable risk factor for IR, may indicate risk for the MS, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. High dietary AGE consumption and serum AGE levels may link healthy obesity to at-risk obesity.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0021-972X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0021-972X
  • 1945-7197
url: Link


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titleElevated Serum Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Obese Indicate Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Link Between Healthy and Unhealthy Obesity?
creatorUribarri, Jaime ; Cai, Weijing ; Woodward, Mark ; Tripp, Elizabeth ; Goldberg, Laurie ; Pyzik, Renata ; Yee, Kalle ; Tansman, Laurie ; Chen, Xue ; Mani, Venkatesh ; Fayad, Zahi A ; Vlassara, Helen
creatorcontribUribarri, Jaime ; Cai, Weijing ; Woodward, Mark ; Tripp, Elizabeth ; Goldberg, Laurie ; Pyzik, Renata ; Yee, Kalle ; Tansman, Laurie ; Chen, Xue ; Mani, Venkatesh ; Fayad, Zahi A ; Vlassara, Helen
descriptionContext: Although obesity can predispose to the metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, not all obese subjects develop MS, hence the need for new indicators of risk for this syndrome. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) correlate with factors involved in the MS, including inflammation and insulin resistance (IR). Because AGEs can be derived from food and are modifiable, it is important to determine whether they are a risk factor for MS. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the association of endogenous and exogenous AGEs with MS criteria. Design: The following data were collected in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without the MS: serum AGEs (sAGEs) and mononuclear cell AGEs, metabolites, pro- and antiinflammatory markers, body fat mass measures, including abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and caloric and dietary AGE (dAGE) consumption. Setting: The study was conducted in the general community. Participants: Participants included 130 MS and 139 non-MS subjects of both sexes, older than 50 years. Results: sAGEs (ϵN-carboxymethyllysine, methylglyoxal) were markedly elevated in obese persons with more than one other MS criteria but not in obese without MS criteria. sAGEs directly correlated with markers of IR (HOMA) and inflammation (leptin, TNFα, RAGE) and inversely with innate defenses (SIRT1, AGE receptor 1 [AGER1], glyoxalase-I, adiponectin). sAGEs correlated with dAGEs but not with calories, nutrient consumption, or fat mass measures. Consumption of dAGE, but not of calories, was markedly higher in MS than in non-MS. Conclusion: High sAGEs, a modifiable risk factor for IR, may indicate risk for the MS, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. High dietary AGE consumption and serum AGE levels may link healthy obesity to at-risk obesity.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Aged ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Female ; Glycation End Products, Advanced - blood ; Humans ; Insulin Resistance ; Male ; Metabolic Syndrome - blood ; Metabolic Syndrome - etiology ; Middle Aged ; Obesity - blood ; Obesity - complications ; Original ; Original Articles ; Risk Factors
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7Tansman, Laurie
8Chen, Xue
9Mani, Venkatesh
10Fayad, Zahi A
11Vlassara, Helen
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0Elevated Serum Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Obese Indicate Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Link Between Healthy and Unhealthy Obesity?
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descriptionContext: Although obesity can predispose to the metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, not all obese subjects develop MS, hence the need for new indicators of risk for this syndrome. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) correlate with factors involved in the MS, including inflammation and insulin resistance (IR). Because AGEs can be derived from food and are modifiable, it is important to determine whether they are a risk factor for MS. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the association of endogenous and exogenous AGEs with MS criteria. Design: The following data were collected in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without the MS: serum AGEs (sAGEs) and mononuclear cell AGEs, metabolites, pro- and antiinflammatory markers, body fat mass measures, including abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and caloric and dietary AGE (dAGE) consumption. Setting: The study was conducted in the general community. Participants: Participants included 130 MS and 139 non-MS subjects of both sexes, older than 50 years. Results: sAGEs (ϵN-carboxymethyllysine, methylglyoxal) were markedly elevated in obese persons with more than one other MS criteria but not in obese without MS criteria. sAGEs directly correlated with markers of IR (HOMA) and inflammation (leptin, TNFα, RAGE) and inversely with innate defenses (SIRT1, AGE receptor 1 [AGER1], glyoxalase-I, adiponectin). sAGEs correlated with dAGEs but not with calories, nutrient consumption, or fat mass measures. Consumption of dAGE, but not of calories, was markedly higher in MS than in non-MS. Conclusion: High sAGEs, a modifiable risk factor for IR, may indicate risk for the MS, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. High dietary AGE consumption and serum AGE levels may link healthy obesity to at-risk obesity.
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titleElevated Serum Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Obese Indicate Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Link Between Healthy and Unhealthy Obesity?
authorUribarri, Jaime ; Cai, Weijing ; Woodward, Mark ; Tripp, Elizabeth ; Goldberg, Laurie ; Pyzik, Renata ; Yee, Kalle ; Tansman, Laurie ; Chen, Xue ; Mani, Venkatesh ; Fayad, Zahi A ; Vlassara, Helen
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4Glycation End Products, Advanced - blood
5Humans
6Insulin Resistance
7Male
8Metabolic Syndrome - blood
9Metabolic Syndrome - etiology
10Middle Aged
11Obesity - blood
12Obesity - complications
13Original
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15Risk Factors
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1Cai, Weijing
2Woodward, Mark
3Tripp, Elizabeth
4Goldberg, Laurie
5Pyzik, Renata
6Yee, Kalle
7Tansman, Laurie
8Chen, Xue
9Mani, Venkatesh
10Fayad, Zahi A
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8Chen, Xue
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atitleElevated Serum Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Obese Indicate Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Link Between Healthy and Unhealthy Obesity?
jtitleThe journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
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notes
0This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant DK091231 (to H.V.) and National Institute of Research Resources Grant MO1-RR-00071 (awarded to the General Clinical Research Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine) for clinical and statistical support.
1J.U. and W.C. contributed equally to this work.
abstractContext: Although obesity can predispose to the metabolic syndrome (MS), diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, not all obese subjects develop MS, hence the need for new indicators of risk for this syndrome. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) correlate with factors involved in the MS, including inflammation and insulin resistance (IR). Because AGEs can be derived from food and are modifiable, it is important to determine whether they are a risk factor for MS. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the association of endogenous and exogenous AGEs with MS criteria. Design: The following data were collected in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without the MS: serum AGEs (sAGEs) and mononuclear cell AGEs, metabolites, pro- and antiinflammatory markers, body fat mass measures, including abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and caloric and dietary AGE (dAGE) consumption. Setting: The study was conducted in the general community. Participants: Participants included 130 MS and 139 non-MS subjects of both sexes, older than 50 years. Results: sAGEs (ϵN-carboxymethyllysine, methylglyoxal) were markedly elevated in obese persons with more than one other MS criteria but not in obese without MS criteria. sAGEs directly correlated with markers of IR (HOMA) and inflammation (leptin, TNFα, RAGE) and inversely with innate defenses (SIRT1, AGE receptor 1 [AGER1], glyoxalase-I, adiponectin). sAGEs correlated with dAGEs but not with calories, nutrient consumption, or fat mass measures. Consumption of dAGE, but not of calories, was markedly higher in MS than in non-MS. Conclusion: High sAGEs, a modifiable risk factor for IR, may indicate risk for the MS, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. High dietary AGE consumption and serum AGE levels may link healthy obesity to at-risk obesity.
copUnited States
pubEndocrine Society
pmid25695886
doi10.1210/jc.2014-3925
oafree_for_read