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The challenge of crafting policy for do-it-yourself brain stimulation

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become gal... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Medical Ethics 2015-05, Vol.41 (5), p.410-412
Main Author: Fitz, Nicholas S
Other Authors: Reiner, Peter B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Non
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Institute of Medical Ethics and BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0306-6800
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23733050
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4431326
title: The challenge of crafting policy for do-it-yourself brain stimulation
format: Article
creator:
  • Fitz, Nicholas S
  • Reiner, Peter B
subjects:
  • 1506
  • 1612
  • Analysis
  • Bioethics
  • Brain
  • Brain stimulation
  • Canada
  • Cognition
  • Deep Brain Stimulation - ethics
  • Deep Brain Stimulation - instrumentation
  • Electric currents
  • Electrical Stimulation of the Brain
  • Electrodes
  • Enhancement
  • Ethical aspects
  • Government regulation
  • Health policy
  • Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
  • Health Policy - trends
  • Humans
  • Invasive Brain Stimulation
  • Laws, regulations and rules
  • Medical ethics
  • Medical policy
  • Neuroethics
  • Neurosciences
  • Non
  • Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation
  • Policy Making
  • Regulation
  • Regulation of financial institutions
  • Scientists
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation - ethics
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation - instrumentation
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Viewpoint
ispartof: Journal of Medical Ethics, 2015-05, Vol.41 (5), p.410-412
description: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become galvanised by reports that tDCS can be used as an all-purpose cognitive enhancer. We provide practical recommendations designed to guide balanced discourse, propagate norms of safe use and stimulate dialogue between the DIY community and regulatory authorities. We call on all stakeholders—regulators, scientists and the DIY community—to share in crafting policy proposals that ensure public safety while supporting DIY innovation.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0306-6800
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0306-6800
  • 1473-4257
url: Link


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descriptionTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become galvanised by reports that tDCS can be used as an all-purpose cognitive enhancer. We provide practical recommendations designed to guide balanced discourse, propagate norms of safe use and stimulate dialogue between the DIY community and regulatory authorities. We call on all stakeholders—regulators, scientists and the DIY community—to share in crafting policy proposals that ensure public safety while supporting DIY innovation.
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subject1506 ; 1612 ; Analysis ; Bioethics ; Brain ; Brain stimulation ; Canada ; Cognition ; Deep Brain Stimulation - ethics ; Deep Brain Stimulation - instrumentation ; Electric currents ; Electrical Stimulation of the Brain ; Electrodes ; Enhancement ; Ethical aspects ; Government regulation ; Health policy ; Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence ; Health Policy - trends ; Humans ; Invasive Brain Stimulation ; Laws, regulations and rules ; Medical ethics ; Medical policy ; Neuroethics ; Neurosciences ; Non ; Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation ; Policy Making ; Regulation ; Regulation of financial institutions ; Scientists ; Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation - ethics ; Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation - instrumentation ; Treatment Outcome ; Viewpoint
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abstractTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become galvanised by reports that tDCS can be used as an all-purpose cognitive enhancer. We provide practical recommendations designed to guide balanced discourse, propagate norms of safe use and stimulate dialogue between the DIY community and regulatory authorities. We call on all stakeholders—regulators, scientists and the DIY community—to share in crafting policy proposals that ensure public safety while supporting DIY innovation.
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