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Diet, growth, and obesity development throughout childhood in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

Publications from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children covering diet, growth, and obesity development during childhood are reviewed. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires and food records. Growth data were collected by routine measurements, and in standardized clinics, bo... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition Reviews 2015-10, Vol.73 (suppl_3), p.175-206
Main Author: Emmett, Pauline M
Other Authors: Jones, Louise R
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 0029-6643
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26395342
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4586450
title: Diet, growth, and obesity development throughout childhood in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children
format: Article
creator:
  • Emmett, Pauline M
  • Jones, Louise R
subjects:
  • Adiposity - genetics
  • ALSPAC
  • Body Composition
  • Body fat
  • Body Mass Index
  • Child
  • Child Development
  • Child, Preschool
  • childhood diet
  • Diet
  • Diet Records
  • Diet Surveys
  • Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
  • Educational attainment
  • Educational Status
  • energy density
  • Energy Intake
  • England
  • fat mass
  • Feeding Behavior
  • fruit
  • fruit and vegetables
  • Growth
  • Humans
  • Inequality
  • Infant
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Nutritive Value
  • Obesity
  • Obesity in children
  • Parents
  • Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology
  • Pediatric Obesity - etiology
  • Pediatric Obesity - genetics
  • sugar
  • Supplement
  • Supplement Articles
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • vegetables
ispartof: Nutrition Reviews, 2015-10, Vol.73 (suppl_3), p.175-206
description: Publications from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children covering diet, growth, and obesity development during childhood are reviewed. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires and food records. Growth data were collected by routine measurements, and in standardized clinics, body fatness was assessed by bioelectrical impedance and DXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans. Diets changed dramatically during the preschool period with an increase in the intake of free (added) sugars (12.3% rising to 16.4% of energy) that remained similar until adolescence. This was due to increased intake of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. Two periods of rapid growth were identified; infancy and mid-childhood (ages 7–11 y) and both were associated with obesity development. Diets with high energy density were associated with increasing fat mass from mid-childhood until adolescence. Genetic and dietary factors showed independent associations with increasing adiposity. At all ages studied, there were dietary inequalities related to maternal educational attainment that may influence inequalities found in obesity development. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children has provided valuable insights into how disparities in diet and growth may affect the development of ill health in adulthood.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-6643
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-6643
  • 1753-4887
url: Link


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descriptionPublications from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children covering diet, growth, and obesity development during childhood are reviewed. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires and food records. Growth data were collected by routine measurements, and in standardized clinics, body fatness was assessed by bioelectrical impedance and DXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans. Diets changed dramatically during the preschool period with an increase in the intake of free (added) sugars (12.3% rising to 16.4% of energy) that remained similar until adolescence. This was due to increased intake of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. Two periods of rapid growth were identified; infancy and mid-childhood (ages 7–11 y) and both were associated with obesity development. Diets with high energy density were associated with increasing fat mass from mid-childhood until adolescence. Genetic and dietary factors showed independent associations with increasing adiposity. At all ages studied, there were dietary inequalities related to maternal educational attainment that may influence inequalities found in obesity development. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children has provided valuable insights into how disparities in diet and growth may affect the development of ill health in adulthood.
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publisherUnited States: Oxford University Press
subjectAdiposity - genetics ; ALSPAC ; Body Composition ; Body fat ; Body Mass Index ; Child ; Child Development ; Child, Preschool ; childhood diet ; Diet ; Diet Records ; Diet Surveys ; Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage ; Educational attainment ; Educational Status ; energy density ; Energy Intake ; England ; fat mass ; Feeding Behavior ; fruit ; fruit and vegetables ; Growth ; Humans ; Inequality ; Infant ; Longitudinal Studies ; Nutritive Value ; Obesity ; Obesity in children ; Parents ; Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology ; Pediatric Obesity - etiology ; Pediatric Obesity - genetics ; sugar ; Supplement ; Supplement Articles ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; vegetables
ispartofNutrition Reviews, 2015-10, Vol.73 (suppl_3), p.175-206
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32Pediatric Obesity - etiology
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abstractPublications from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children covering diet, growth, and obesity development during childhood are reviewed. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires and food records. Growth data were collected by routine measurements, and in standardized clinics, body fatness was assessed by bioelectrical impedance and DXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans. Diets changed dramatically during the preschool period with an increase in the intake of free (added) sugars (12.3% rising to 16.4% of energy) that remained similar until adolescence. This was due to increased intake of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. Two periods of rapid growth were identified; infancy and mid-childhood (ages 7–11 y) and both were associated with obesity development. Diets with high energy density were associated with increasing fat mass from mid-childhood until adolescence. Genetic and dietary factors showed independent associations with increasing adiposity. At all ages studied, there were dietary inequalities related to maternal educational attainment that may influence inequalities found in obesity development. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children has provided valuable insights into how disparities in diet and growth may affect the development of ill health in adulthood.
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