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Cholinergic Signaling Controls Conditioned Fear Behaviors and Enhances Plasticity of Cortical-Amygdala Circuits

We examined the contribution of endogenous cholinergic signaling to the acquisition and extinction of fear- related memory by optogenetic regulation of cholinergic input to the basal lateral amygdala (BLA). Stimulation of cholinergic terminal fields within the BLA in awake-behaving mice during train... Full description

Journal Title: Neuron (Cambridge Mass.), 2016-06-01, Vol.90 (5), p.1057-1070
Main Author: Jiang, Li
Other Authors: Kundu, Srikanya , Lederman, James D , López-Hernández, Gretchen Y , Ballinger, Elizabeth C , Wang, Shaohua , Talmage, David A , Role, Lorna W
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0896-6273
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27161525
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4891303
title: Cholinergic Signaling Controls Conditioned Fear Behaviors and Enhances Plasticity of Cortical-Amygdala Circuits
format: Article
creator:
  • Jiang, Li
  • Kundu, Srikanya
  • Lederman, James D
  • López-Hernández, Gretchen Y
  • Ballinger, Elizabeth C
  • Wang, Shaohua
  • Talmage, David A
  • Role, Lorna W
subjects:
  • Alzheimers disease
  • Amygdala - physiology
  • Animals
  • Article
  • Behavior
  • Cerebral Cortex - physiology
  • Cholinergic Neurons - physiology
  • Conditioning (Psychology) - physiology
  • Extinction, Psychological - physiology
  • Fear - physiology
  • Fear - psychology
  • Glutamic Acid - physiology
  • Long-Term Potentiation - physiology
  • Male
  • Memory
  • Memory - physiology
  • Mice
  • Neural Pathways - physiology
  • Neuronal Plasticity - physiology
  • Neurons
  • Neurophysiology
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Recall
  • Receptors, Cholinergic - physiology
  • Rodents
  • Synaptic Transmission - physiology
  • Weaning
ispartof: Neuron (Cambridge, Mass.), 2016-06-01, Vol.90 (5), p.1057-1070
description: We examined the contribution of endogenous cholinergic signaling to the acquisition and extinction of fear- related memory by optogenetic regulation of cholinergic input to the basal lateral amygdala (BLA). Stimulation of cholinergic terminal fields within the BLA in awake-behaving mice during training in a cued fear-conditioning paradigm slowed the extinction of learned fear as assayed by multi-day retention of extinction learning. Inhibition of cholinergic activity during training reduced the acquisition of learned fear behaviors. Circuit mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of cholinergic signaling in the BLA were assessed by in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiological recording. Photostimulation of endogenous cholinergic input (1) enhances firing of putative BLA principal neurons through activation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), (2) enhances glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA, and (3) induces LTP of cortical-amygdala circuits. These studies support an essential role of cholinergic modulation of BLA circuits in the inscription and retention of fear memories. •Photostimulation of ACh in BLA during cue-fear training makes memory more durable•Stimulating ACh input to BLA in vivo and ex vivo increases neuronal excitability•Stimulating ACh input to BLA can elicit LTP•All of the above effects are dependent on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) Jiang et al. demonstrate that manipulating BLA cholinergic input is important for emotional memory acquisition/retention. Stimulating ACh input increases principal neuron excitability and enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in BLA. AChR antagonists block these effects.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0896-6273
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0896-6273
  • 1097-4199
url: Link


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descriptionWe examined the contribution of endogenous cholinergic signaling to the acquisition and extinction of fear- related memory by optogenetic regulation of cholinergic input to the basal lateral amygdala (BLA). Stimulation of cholinergic terminal fields within the BLA in awake-behaving mice during training in a cued fear-conditioning paradigm slowed the extinction of learned fear as assayed by multi-day retention of extinction learning. Inhibition of cholinergic activity during training reduced the acquisition of learned fear behaviors. Circuit mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of cholinergic signaling in the BLA were assessed by in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiological recording. Photostimulation of endogenous cholinergic input (1) enhances firing of putative BLA principal neurons through activation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), (2) enhances glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA, and (3) induces LTP of cortical-amygdala circuits. These studies support an essential role of cholinergic modulation of BLA circuits in the inscription and retention of fear memories. •Photostimulation of ACh in BLA during cue-fear training makes memory more durable•Stimulating ACh input to BLA in vivo and ex vivo increases neuronal excitability•Stimulating ACh input to BLA can elicit LTP•All of the above effects are dependent on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) Jiang et al. demonstrate that manipulating BLA cholinergic input is important for emotional memory acquisition/retention. Stimulating ACh input increases principal neuron excitability and enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in BLA. AChR antagonists block these effects.
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subjectAlzheimers disease ; Amygdala - physiology ; Animals ; Article ; Behavior ; Cerebral Cortex - physiology ; Cholinergic Neurons - physiology ; Conditioning (Psychology) - physiology ; Extinction, Psychological - physiology ; Fear - physiology ; Fear - psychology ; Glutamic Acid - physiology ; Long-Term Potentiation - physiology ; Male ; Memory ; Memory - physiology ; Mice ; Neural Pathways - physiology ; Neuronal Plasticity - physiology ; Neurons ; Neurophysiology ; Photic Stimulation ; Recall ; Receptors, Cholinergic - physiology ; Rodents ; Synaptic Transmission - physiology ; Weaning
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descriptionWe examined the contribution of endogenous cholinergic signaling to the acquisition and extinction of fear- related memory by optogenetic regulation of cholinergic input to the basal lateral amygdala (BLA). Stimulation of cholinergic terminal fields within the BLA in awake-behaving mice during training in a cued fear-conditioning paradigm slowed the extinction of learned fear as assayed by multi-day retention of extinction learning. Inhibition of cholinergic activity during training reduced the acquisition of learned fear behaviors. Circuit mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of cholinergic signaling in the BLA were assessed by in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiological recording. Photostimulation of endogenous cholinergic input (1) enhances firing of putative BLA principal neurons through activation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), (2) enhances glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA, and (3) induces LTP of cortical-amygdala circuits. These studies support an essential role of cholinergic modulation of BLA circuits in the inscription and retention of fear memories. •Photostimulation of ACh in BLA during cue-fear training makes memory more durable•Stimulating ACh input to BLA in vivo and ex vivo increases neuronal excitability•Stimulating ACh input to BLA can elicit LTP•All of the above effects are dependent on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) Jiang et al. demonstrate that manipulating BLA cholinergic input is important for emotional memory acquisition/retention. Stimulating ACh input increases principal neuron excitability and enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in BLA. AChR antagonists block these effects.
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authorJiang, Li ; Kundu, Srikanya ; Lederman, James D ; López-Hernández, Gretchen Y ; Ballinger, Elizabeth C ; Wang, Shaohua ; Talmage, David A ; Role, Lorna W
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abstractWe examined the contribution of endogenous cholinergic signaling to the acquisition and extinction of fear- related memory by optogenetic regulation of cholinergic input to the basal lateral amygdala (BLA). Stimulation of cholinergic terminal fields within the BLA in awake-behaving mice during training in a cued fear-conditioning paradigm slowed the extinction of learned fear as assayed by multi-day retention of extinction learning. Inhibition of cholinergic activity during training reduced the acquisition of learned fear behaviors. Circuit mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of cholinergic signaling in the BLA were assessed by in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiological recording. Photostimulation of endogenous cholinergic input (1) enhances firing of putative BLA principal neurons through activation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), (2) enhances glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA, and (3) induces LTP of cortical-amygdala circuits. These studies support an essential role of cholinergic modulation of BLA circuits in the inscription and retention of fear memories. •Photostimulation of ACh in BLA during cue-fear training makes memory more durable•Stimulating ACh input to BLA in vivo and ex vivo increases neuronal excitability•Stimulating ACh input to BLA can elicit LTP•All of the above effects are dependent on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) Jiang et al. demonstrate that manipulating BLA cholinergic input is important for emotional memory acquisition/retention. Stimulating ACh input increases principal neuron excitability and enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in BLA. AChR antagonists block these effects.
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