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Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP): Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice

Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can a... Full description

Journal Title: Hypertension 2016-05, Vol.67 (5), p.941-950
Main Author: Sheppard, James P
Other Authors: Stevens, Richard , Gill, Paramjit , Martin, Una , Godwin, Marshall , Hanley, Janet , Heneghan, Carl , Hobbs, F.D Richard , Mant, Jonathan , McKinstry, Brian , Myers, Martin , Nunan, David , Ward, Alison , Williams, Bryan , McManus, Richard J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: American Heart Association, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0194-911X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27001299
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_4905620
title: Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP): Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice
format: Article
creator:
  • Sheppard, James P
  • Stevens, Richard
  • Gill, Paramjit
  • Martin, Una
  • Godwin, Marshall
  • Hanley, Janet
  • Heneghan, Carl
  • Hobbs, F.D Richard
  • Mant, Jonathan
  • McKinstry, Brian
  • Myers, Martin
  • Nunan, David
  • Ward, Alison
  • Williams, Bryan
  • McManus, Richard J
subjects:
  • 10069
  • 10072
  • 10111
  • 10121
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Algorithms
  • ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Blood Pressure Determination - methods
  • Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods
  • Canada
  • Circadian Rhythm
  • Cohort Studies
  • Databases, Factual
  • Female
  • Humans
  • hypertension
  • Linear Models
  • Male
  • masked hypertension
  • Masked Hypertension - diagnosis
  • Middle Aged
  • Office Visits
  • Original
  • prediction tool
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • Risk Assessment
  • ROC Curve
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • white coat hypertension
  • White Coat Hypertension - diagnosis
ispartof: Hypertension, 2016-05, Vol.67 (5), p.941-950
description: Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home–clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home–clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48–0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85–0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient’s blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0194-911X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0194-911X
  • 1524-4563
  • 1524-4563
url: Link


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titlePredicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP): Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice
creatorSheppard, James P ; Stevens, Richard ; Gill, Paramjit ; Martin, Una ; Godwin, Marshall ; Hanley, Janet ; Heneghan, Carl ; Hobbs, F.D Richard ; Mant, Jonathan ; McKinstry, Brian ; Myers, Martin ; Nunan, David ; Ward, Alison ; Williams, Bryan ; McManus, Richard J
creatorcontribSheppard, James P ; Stevens, Richard ; Gill, Paramjit ; Martin, Una ; Godwin, Marshall ; Hanley, Janet ; Heneghan, Carl ; Hobbs, F.D Richard ; Mant, Jonathan ; McKinstry, Brian ; Myers, Martin ; Nunan, David ; Ward, Alison ; Williams, Bryan ; McManus, Richard J
descriptionPatients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home–clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home–clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48–0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85–0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient’s blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment.
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subject10069 ; 10072 ; 10111 ; 10121 ; Adult ; Aged ; Algorithms ; ambulatory blood pressure monitoring ; Blood Pressure Determination - methods ; Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods ; Canada ; Circadian Rhythm ; Cohort Studies ; Databases, Factual ; Female ; Humans ; hypertension ; Linear Models ; Male ; masked hypertension ; Masked Hypertension - diagnosis ; Middle Aged ; Office Visits ; Original ; prediction tool ; Predictive Value of Tests ; Risk Assessment ; ROC Curve ; Sensitivity and Specificity ; United Kingdom ; United States ; white coat hypertension ; White Coat Hypertension - diagnosis
ispartofHypertension, 2016-05, Vol.67 (5), p.941-950
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descriptionPatients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home–clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home–clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48–0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85–0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient’s blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment.
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titlePredicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP): Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice
authorSheppard, James P ; Stevens, Richard ; Gill, Paramjit ; Martin, Una ; Godwin, Marshall ; Hanley, Janet ; Heneghan, Carl ; Hobbs, F.D Richard ; Mant, Jonathan ; McKinstry, Brian ; Myers, Martin ; Nunan, David ; Ward, Alison ; Williams, Bryan ; McManus, Richard J
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abstractPatients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home–clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home–clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48–0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85–0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient’s blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment.
copUnited States
pubAmerican Heart Association, Inc
pmid27001299
doi10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.115.07108
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