schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Effects of exercise training on intrahepatic lipid content in humans

Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is the most common liver disorder in western society. Various factors may play a role in determining hepatic fat content, such as delivery of lipids to the liver, de novo lipogenesis, hepatic lipid oxidation, secretion of intrahepatic lipids to the circulation or a c... Full description

Journal Title: Diabetologia 2016-10, Vol.59 (10), p.2068-2079
Main Author: Brouwers, Bram
Other Authors: Hesselink, Matthijs K. C , Schrauwen, Patrick , Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Non
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
ID: ISSN: 0012-186X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27393135
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5016557
title: Effects of exercise training on intrahepatic lipid content in humans
format: Article
creator:
  • Brouwers, Bram
  • Hesselink, Matthijs K. C
  • Schrauwen, Patrick
  • Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
subjects:
  • alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Analysis
  • Diabetes
  • Endocrinology
  • Exercise
  • Exercise - physiology
  • Human
  • Human Physiology
  • Humans
  • Insulin resistance
  • Insulin Resistance - physiology
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Insulin sensitivity and resistance
  • Internal Medicine
  • Lipid metabolism
  • Lipid Metabolism - physiology
  • Lipids
  • Lipids - analysis
  • Liver
  • Liver - metabolism
  • Medicine
  • Medicine & Public Health
  • Metabolic Diseases
  • Metabolism
  • Muscles
  • Non
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Physiological aspects
  • Prediction
  • Prediction and prevention of type 2 diabetes
  • Prevention
  • prevention of type 2 diabetes
  • resistance
  • Review
  • Type 2 diabetes
ispartof: Diabetologia, 2016-10, Vol.59 (10), p.2068-2079
description: Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is the most common liver disorder in western society. Various factors may play a role in determining hepatic fat content, such as delivery of lipids to the liver, de novo lipogenesis, hepatic lipid oxidation, secretion of intrahepatic lipids to the circulation or a combination of these. If delivery of lipids to the liver outweighs the sum of hepatic lipid oxidation and secretion, the intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content starts to increase and NAFL may develop. NAFL is closely related to obesity and insulin resistance and a fatty liver increases the vulnerability to type 2 diabetes development. Exercise training is a cornerstone in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes. There is a large body of literature describing the beneficial metabolic consequences of exercise training on skeletal muscle metabolism. Recent studies have started to investigate the effects of exercise training on liver metabolism but data is still limited. Here, first, we briefly discuss the routes by which IHL content is modulated. Second, we review whether and how these contributing routes might be modulated by long-term exercise training. Third, we focus on the effects of acute exercise on IHL metabolism, since exercise also might affect hepatic metabolism in the physically active state. This will give insight into whether the effect of exercise training on IHL could be explained by the accumulated effect of acute bouts of exercise, or whether adaptations might occur only after long-term exercise training. The primary focus of this review will be on observations made in humans. Where human data is missing, data obtained from well-accepted animal models will be used.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-186X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0012-186X
  • 1432-0428
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.6322765
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_pubme
recordidTN_cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5016557
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA462909854
sourcerecordidA462909854
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1718t-2e0fbfb8df0ebdb0ae85e6aadaf84956fef8581ebc5da4a7d9c3122ef606e2b30
addsrcrecordideNqNUk1v1TAQjBCIPgo_gAuKxIVLiu3YcXJBqtryIVVwAYmbtbHX77kkTrCT0v57nKY8tT1UyAfL3pnR7uxk2WtKjigh8n0khDJREFoVnJSyuHqSbSgvWUE4q59mm6Vc0Lr6eZC9iPGCEFIKXj3PDpgsm5KWYpOdnlmLeor5YHO8wqBdxHwK4Lzz23zwufPptcMRJqfzzo3O5HrwE_oplfLd3IOPL7NnFrqIr27vw-zHx7PvJ5-L82-fvpwcnxdU0noqGBLb2rY2lmBrWgJYC6wADNiaN6KyaGtRU2y1MMBBmkaXlDG0FamQtSU5zD6suuPc9mg0Lr11agyuh3CtBnDqfsW7ndoOl0oki4SQSeDrKjCM6MEFvMc1Hidl0Myj-mNVMk81gmuU3EppIbkHouSWaGaBcaOB0ST47rajMPyeMU6qd1Fj14HHYY6K1kw2tJQl-R8oEY1o6AJ9-wB6MczBJ2sTikopaM1FQh2tqC10qJy3Q5pZp2Owd2lHaF36P-YVa0hTC54IdCXoMMQY0O6np0QtgVJroFRySy2BUleJ8-au5XvGvwQlgHwgqt2UwjIsG3Ddo9JsZcYk6rcY7kz5COnXSvKwZHXfz9zfrFCH9NcDxCk4vZtm7y4xRDddK98t2eicvuktqkq2UMtKKLDQKt5UrQIjUQGFqqSNhhRW8hcU1hDB
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1817751845
display
typearticle
titleEffects of exercise training on intrahepatic lipid content in humans
creatorBrouwers, Bram ; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C ; Schrauwen, Patrick ; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
creatorcontribBrouwers, Bram ; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C ; Schrauwen, Patrick ; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
descriptionNon-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is the most common liver disorder in western society. Various factors may play a role in determining hepatic fat content, such as delivery of lipids to the liver, de novo lipogenesis, hepatic lipid oxidation, secretion of intrahepatic lipids to the circulation or a combination of these. If delivery of lipids to the liver outweighs the sum of hepatic lipid oxidation and secretion, the intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content starts to increase and NAFL may develop. NAFL is closely related to obesity and insulin resistance and a fatty liver increases the vulnerability to type 2 diabetes development. Exercise training is a cornerstone in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes. There is a large body of literature describing the beneficial metabolic consequences of exercise training on skeletal muscle metabolism. Recent studies have started to investigate the effects of exercise training on liver metabolism but data is still limited. Here, first, we briefly discuss the routes by which IHL content is modulated. Second, we review whether and how these contributing routes might be modulated by long-term exercise training. Third, we focus on the effects of acute exercise on IHL metabolism, since exercise also might affect hepatic metabolism in the physically active state. This will give insight into whether the effect of exercise training on IHL could be explained by the accumulated effect of acute bouts of exercise, or whether adaptations might occur only after long-term exercise training. The primary focus of this review will be on observations made in humans. Where human data is missing, data obtained from well-accepted animal models will be used.
identifier
0ISSN: 0012-186X
1EISSN: 1432-0428
2DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-4037-x
3PMID: 27393135
languageeng
publisherBerlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
subjectalcoholic fatty liver disease ; Analysis ; Diabetes ; Endocrinology ; Exercise ; Exercise - physiology ; Human ; Human Physiology ; Humans ; Insulin resistance ; Insulin Resistance - physiology ; Insulin sensitivity ; Insulin sensitivity and resistance ; Internal Medicine ; Lipid metabolism ; Lipid Metabolism - physiology ; Lipids ; Lipids - analysis ; Liver ; Liver - metabolism ; Medicine ; Medicine & Public Health ; Metabolic Diseases ; Metabolism ; Muscles ; Non ; Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease ; Physiological aspects ; Prediction ; Prediction and prevention of type 2 diabetes ; Prevention ; prevention of type 2 diabetes ; resistance ; Review ; Type 2 diabetes
ispartofDiabetologia, 2016-10, Vol.59 (10), p.2068-2079
rights
0info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
1The Author(s) 2016
2COPYRIGHT 2016 Springer
3Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1718t-2e0fbfb8df0ebdb0ae85e6aadaf84956fef8581ebc5da4a7d9c3122ef606e2b30
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1718t-2e0fbfb8df0ebdb0ae85e6aadaf84956fef8581ebc5da4a7d9c3122ef606e2b30
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27393135$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Brouwers, Bram
1Hesselink, Matthijs K. C
2Schrauwen, Patrick
3Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
title
0Effects of exercise training on intrahepatic lipid content in humans
1Diabetologia
addtitle
0Diabetologia
1Diabetologia
descriptionNon-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is the most common liver disorder in western society. Various factors may play a role in determining hepatic fat content, such as delivery of lipids to the liver, de novo lipogenesis, hepatic lipid oxidation, secretion of intrahepatic lipids to the circulation or a combination of these. If delivery of lipids to the liver outweighs the sum of hepatic lipid oxidation and secretion, the intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content starts to increase and NAFL may develop. NAFL is closely related to obesity and insulin resistance and a fatty liver increases the vulnerability to type 2 diabetes development. Exercise training is a cornerstone in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes. There is a large body of literature describing the beneficial metabolic consequences of exercise training on skeletal muscle metabolism. Recent studies have started to investigate the effects of exercise training on liver metabolism but data is still limited. Here, first, we briefly discuss the routes by which IHL content is modulated. Second, we review whether and how these contributing routes might be modulated by long-term exercise training. Third, we focus on the effects of acute exercise on IHL metabolism, since exercise also might affect hepatic metabolism in the physically active state. This will give insight into whether the effect of exercise training on IHL could be explained by the accumulated effect of acute bouts of exercise, or whether adaptations might occur only after long-term exercise training. The primary focus of this review will be on observations made in humans. Where human data is missing, data obtained from well-accepted animal models will be used.
subject
0alcoholic fatty liver disease
1Analysis
2Diabetes
3Endocrinology
4Exercise
5Exercise - physiology
6Human
7Human Physiology
8Humans
9Insulin resistance
10Insulin Resistance - physiology
11Insulin sensitivity
12Insulin sensitivity and resistance
13Internal Medicine
14Lipid metabolism
15Lipid Metabolism - physiology
16Lipids
17Lipids - analysis
18Liver
19Liver - metabolism
20Medicine
21Medicine & Public Health
22Metabolic Diseases
23Metabolism
24Muscles
25Non
26Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
27Physiological aspects
28Prediction
29Prediction and prevention of type 2 diabetes
30Prevention
31prevention of type 2 diabetes
32resistance
33Review
34Type 2 diabetes
issn
00012-186X
11432-0428
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2016
recordtypearticle
recordideNqNUk1v1TAQjBCIPgo_gAuKxIVLiu3YcXJBqtryIVVwAYmbtbHX77kkTrCT0v57nKY8tT1UyAfL3pnR7uxk2WtKjigh8n0khDJREFoVnJSyuHqSbSgvWUE4q59mm6Vc0Lr6eZC9iPGCEFIKXj3PDpgsm5KWYpOdnlmLeor5YHO8wqBdxHwK4Lzz23zwufPptcMRJqfzzo3O5HrwE_oplfLd3IOPL7NnFrqIr27vw-zHx7PvJ5-L82-fvpwcnxdU0noqGBLb2rY2lmBrWgJYC6wADNiaN6KyaGtRU2y1MMBBmkaXlDG0FamQtSU5zD6suuPc9mg0Lr11agyuh3CtBnDqfsW7ndoOl0oki4SQSeDrKjCM6MEFvMc1Hidl0Myj-mNVMk81gmuU3EppIbkHouSWaGaBcaOB0ST47rajMPyeMU6qd1Fj14HHYY6K1kw2tJQl-R8oEY1o6AJ9-wB6MczBJ2sTikopaM1FQh2tqC10qJy3Q5pZp2Owd2lHaF36P-YVa0hTC54IdCXoMMQY0O6np0QtgVJroFRySy2BUleJ8-au5XvGvwQlgHwgqt2UwjIsG3Ddo9JsZcYk6rcY7kz5COnXSvKwZHXfz9zfrFCH9NcDxCk4vZtm7y4xRDddK98t2eicvuktqkq2UMtKKLDQKt5UrQIjUQGFqqSNhhRW8hcU1hDB
startdate201610
enddate201610
creator
0Brouwers, Bram
1Hesselink, Matthijs K. C
2Schrauwen, Patrick
3Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
general
0Springer Berlin Heidelberg
1Springer
2Springer Nature B.V
3Springer Nature
scope
05DI
15DJ
2AGBBJ
3QVL
4CGR
5CUY
6CVF
7ECM
8EIF
9NPM
10AAYXX
11CITATION
12BSHEE
133V.
147T5
157X7
167XB
1788E
188AO
198C1
208FI
218FJ
228FK
23ABUWG
24BENPR
25FYUFA
26GHDGH
27H94
28K9.
29M0S
30M1P
31PQEST
32PQQKQ
33PQUKI
34PRINS
357X8
36BOBZL
37CLFQK
385PM
sort
creationdate201610
titleEffects of exercise training on intrahepatic lipid content in humans
authorBrouwers, Bram ; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C ; Schrauwen, Patrick ; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1718t-2e0fbfb8df0ebdb0ae85e6aadaf84956fef8581ebc5da4a7d9c3122ef606e2b30
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2016
topic
0alcoholic fatty liver disease
1Analysis
2Diabetes
3Endocrinology
4Exercise
5Exercise - physiology
6Human
7Human Physiology
8Humans
9Insulin resistance
10Insulin Resistance - physiology
11Insulin sensitivity
12Insulin sensitivity and resistance
13Internal Medicine
14Lipid metabolism
15Lipid Metabolism - physiology
16Lipids
17Lipids - analysis
18Liver
19Liver - metabolism
20Medicine
21Medicine & Public Health
22Metabolic Diseases
23Metabolism
24Muscles
25Non
26Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
27Physiological aspects
28Prediction
29Prediction and prevention of type 2 diabetes
30Prevention
31prevention of type 2 diabetes
32resistance
33Review
34Type 2 diabetes
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Brouwers, Bram
1Hesselink, Matthijs K. C
2Schrauwen, Patrick
3Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
collection
0NARCIS
1NARCIS: Datasets
2Narcis: Open Access
3NARCIS:Publications
4Medline
5MEDLINE
6MEDLINE (Ovid)
7MEDLINE
8MEDLINE
9PubMed
10CrossRef
11Academic OneFile (A&I only)
12ProQuest Central (Corporate)
13Immunology Abstracts
14Health & Medical Collection
15ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
16Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
17ProQuest Pharma Collection
18Public Health Database
19Hospital Premium Collection
20Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
21ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
22ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
23ProQuest Central
24Health Research Premium Collection
25Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
26AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts
27ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
28Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
29Medical Database
30ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
31ProQuest One Academic
32ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
33ProQuest Central China
34MEDLINE - Academic
35OpenAIRE (Open Access)
36OpenAIRE
37PubMed Central (Full Participant titles)
jtitleDiabetologia
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Brouwers, Bram
1Hesselink, Matthijs K. C
2Schrauwen, Patrick
3Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleEffects of exercise training on intrahepatic lipid content in humans
jtitleDiabetologia
stitleDiabetologia
addtitleDiabetologia
date2016-10
risdate2016
volume59
issue10
spage2068
epage2079
pages2068-2079
issn0012-186X
eissn1432-0428
abstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is the most common liver disorder in western society. Various factors may play a role in determining hepatic fat content, such as delivery of lipids to the liver, de novo lipogenesis, hepatic lipid oxidation, secretion of intrahepatic lipids to the circulation or a combination of these. If delivery of lipids to the liver outweighs the sum of hepatic lipid oxidation and secretion, the intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content starts to increase and NAFL may develop. NAFL is closely related to obesity and insulin resistance and a fatty liver increases the vulnerability to type 2 diabetes development. Exercise training is a cornerstone in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes. There is a large body of literature describing the beneficial metabolic consequences of exercise training on skeletal muscle metabolism. Recent studies have started to investigate the effects of exercise training on liver metabolism but data is still limited. Here, first, we briefly discuss the routes by which IHL content is modulated. Second, we review whether and how these contributing routes might be modulated by long-term exercise training. Third, we focus on the effects of acute exercise on IHL metabolism, since exercise also might affect hepatic metabolism in the physically active state. This will give insight into whether the effect of exercise training on IHL could be explained by the accumulated effect of acute bouts of exercise, or whether adaptations might occur only after long-term exercise training. The primary focus of this review will be on observations made in humans. Where human data is missing, data obtained from well-accepted animal models will be used.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
pmid27393135
doi10.1007/s00125-016-4037-x
oafree_for_read