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Examining if being overweight really confers protection against dementia: Sixty-four year follow-up of participants in the Glasgow University alumni cohort study

Recent large-scale studies suggest that obesity and overweight may confer protection against future dementia. This observation could, however, be generated by reverse causality. That is, weight loss in the incipient phase of dementia ascribed to diminished self-care, including sub-optimal nutrition,... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of negative results in biomedicine 2016-11-02, Vol.15 (1), p.19-19
Main Author: Batty, G David
Other Authors: Galobardes, Bruna , Starr, John M , Jeffreys, Mona , Davey Smith, George , Russ, Tom C
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: BioMed Central Ltd
ID: ISSN: 1477-5751
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27802801
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title: Examining if being overweight really confers protection against dementia: Sixty-four year follow-up of participants in the Glasgow University alumni cohort study
format: Article
creator:
  • Batty, G David
  • Galobardes, Bruna
  • Starr, John M
  • Jeffreys, Mona
  • Davey Smith, George
  • Russ, Tom C
subjects:
  • Analysis
  • atira
  • Biochemistry
  • Body mass index
  • Brief Report
  • Cohort
  • Cohort Studies
  • Dementia
  • Dementia - epidemiology
  • Dementia - prevention & control
  • Epidemiology
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Genetics
  • Health risk assessment
  • Humans
  • Journal Article
  • Life course
  • Male
  • Medical research
  • Medicine(all)
  • Medicine, Experimental
  • Molecular Biology(all)
  • Mortality
  • Obesity
  • Obesity - epidemiology
  • Obesity in adolescence
  • Overweight
  • Overweight - epidemiology
  • Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Pharmacology
  • Proportional Hazards Models
  • pubmedpublicationtype
  • pure
  • researchoutput
  • Risk factors
  • Scotland - epidemiology
  • Studies
  • Toxicology
  • Universities
  • Weight loss
  • Young Adult
ispartof: Journal of negative results in biomedicine, 2016-11-02, Vol.15 (1), p.19-19
description: Recent large-scale studies suggest that obesity and overweight may confer protection against future dementia. This observation could, however, be generated by reverse causality. That is, weight loss in the incipient phase of dementia ascribed to diminished self-care, including sub-optimal nutrition, would have the effect of generating such an inverse association. One approach to circumventing this problem would be to measure weight in a population which is young enough to be free of the symptoms of dementia which is then followed up for dementia occurrence over many decades. In a prospective cohort study, body mass index, and other potential risk factors, were measured in 9547 male university undergraduates (mean age 20.5 years) in 1948-68 who were then linked to national mortality registers. Of 2537 deaths over a mean of 50.6 years follow up, 140 were ascribed to dementia. There was no association between overweight and future dementia deaths (age-adjusted hazard ratio; 95 % confidence interval: 0.93; 0.49, 1.79). In this cohort study of former university students, being overweight in youth did not confer protection against later dementia death.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1477-5751
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1477-5751
  • 1477-5751
url: Link


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titleExamining if being overweight really confers protection against dementia: Sixty-four year follow-up of participants in the Glasgow University alumni cohort study
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descriptionRecent large-scale studies suggest that obesity and overweight may confer protection against future dementia. This observation could, however, be generated by reverse causality. That is, weight loss in the incipient phase of dementia ascribed to diminished self-care, including sub-optimal nutrition, would have the effect of generating such an inverse association. One approach to circumventing this problem would be to measure weight in a population which is young enough to be free of the symptoms of dementia which is then followed up for dementia occurrence over many decades. In a prospective cohort study, body mass index, and other potential risk factors, were measured in 9547 male university undergraduates (mean age 20.5 years) in 1948-68 who were then linked to national mortality registers. Of 2537 deaths over a mean of 50.6 years follow up, 140 were ascribed to dementia. There was no association between overweight and future dementia deaths (age-adjusted hazard ratio; 95 % confidence interval: 0.93; 0.49, 1.79). In this cohort study of former university students, being overweight in youth did not confer protection against later dementia death.
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subjectAnalysis ; atira ; Biochemistry ; Body mass index ; Brief Report ; Cohort ; Cohort Studies ; Dementia ; Dementia - epidemiology ; Dementia - prevention & control ; Epidemiology ; Follow-Up Studies ; Genetics ; Health risk assessment ; Humans ; Journal Article ; Life course ; Male ; Medical research ; Medicine(all) ; Medicine, Experimental ; Molecular Biology(all) ; Mortality ; Obesity ; Obesity - epidemiology ; Obesity in adolescence ; Overweight ; Overweight - epidemiology ; Pharmaceutics(all) ; Pharmacology ; Proportional Hazards Models ; pubmedpublicationtype ; pure ; researchoutput ; Risk factors ; Scotland - epidemiology ; Studies ; Toxicology ; Universities ; Weight loss ; Young Adult
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descriptionRecent large-scale studies suggest that obesity and overweight may confer protection against future dementia. This observation could, however, be generated by reverse causality. That is, weight loss in the incipient phase of dementia ascribed to diminished self-care, including sub-optimal nutrition, would have the effect of generating such an inverse association. One approach to circumventing this problem would be to measure weight in a population which is young enough to be free of the symptoms of dementia which is then followed up for dementia occurrence over many decades. In a prospective cohort study, body mass index, and other potential risk factors, were measured in 9547 male university undergraduates (mean age 20.5 years) in 1948-68 who were then linked to national mortality registers. Of 2537 deaths over a mean of 50.6 years follow up, 140 were ascribed to dementia. There was no association between overweight and future dementia deaths (age-adjusted hazard ratio; 95 % confidence interval: 0.93; 0.49, 1.79). In this cohort study of former university students, being overweight in youth did not confer protection against later dementia death.
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titleExamining if being overweight really confers protection against dementia: Sixty-four year follow-up of participants in the Glasgow University alumni cohort study
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abstractRecent large-scale studies suggest that obesity and overweight may confer protection against future dementia. This observation could, however, be generated by reverse causality. That is, weight loss in the incipient phase of dementia ascribed to diminished self-care, including sub-optimal nutrition, would have the effect of generating such an inverse association. One approach to circumventing this problem would be to measure weight in a population which is young enough to be free of the symptoms of dementia which is then followed up for dementia occurrence over many decades. In a prospective cohort study, body mass index, and other potential risk factors, were measured in 9547 male university undergraduates (mean age 20.5 years) in 1948-68 who were then linked to national mortality registers. Of 2537 deaths over a mean of 50.6 years follow up, 140 were ascribed to dementia. There was no association between overweight and future dementia deaths (age-adjusted hazard ratio; 95 % confidence interval: 0.93; 0.49, 1.79). In this cohort study of former university students, being overweight in youth did not confer protection against later dementia death.
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