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Obesity Severity and Duration Are Associated With Incident Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence Against Metabolically Healthy Obesity From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Context: Although the health risks of obesity compared to normal weight have been well studied, the cumulative risk associated with chronic obesity remains unknown. Specifically, debate continues about the importance of recommending weight loss for those with metabolically healthy obesity. Objective... Full description

Journal Title: The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 2016-11, Vol.101 (11), p.4117-4124
Main Author: Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana
Other Authors: Foster, Meredith C , Kalyani, Rita R , Vaidya, Dhananjay , Burke, Gregory L , Woodward, Mark , Anderson, Cheryl A.M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Endocrine Society
ID: ISSN: 0021-972X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27552544
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5095229
title: Obesity Severity and Duration Are Associated With Incident Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence Against Metabolically Healthy Obesity From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
format: Article
creator:
  • Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana
  • Foster, Meredith C
  • Kalyani, Rita R
  • Vaidya, Dhananjay
  • Burke, Gregory L
  • Woodward, Mark
  • Anderson, Cheryl A.M
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Aged
  • Atherosclerosis - ethnology
  • Body Mass Index
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • macromolecular substances
  • Male
  • Metabolic Syndrome - diagnosis
  • Metabolic Syndrome - ethnology
  • Metabolic Syndrome - etiology
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity - complications
  • Obesity - diagnosis
  • Obesity - ethnology
  • Obesity, Metabolically Benign - complications
  • Obesity, Metabolically Benign - diagnosis
  • Obesity, Metabolically Benign - ethnology
  • Original
  • Original Articles
  • Prevalence
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Time Factors
  • United States - ethnology
ispartof: The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 2016-11, Vol.101 (11), p.4117-4124
description: Context: Although the health risks of obesity compared to normal weight have been well studied, the cumulative risk associated with chronic obesity remains unknown. Specifically, debate continues about the importance of recommending weight loss for those with metabolically healthy obesity. Objective: We hypothesized that relatively greater severity and longer duration of obesity are associated with greater incident metabolic syndrome. Design, Setting, Participants, and Measures: Using repeated measures logistic regression with random effects, we investigated the association of time-varying obesity severity and duration with incident metabolic syndrome in 2,748 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants with obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) at any visit. Obesity duration was defined as the cumulative number of visits with measured obesity and obesity severity by the World Health Organization levels I–III based on body mass index. Metabolic syndrome was defined using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified to exclude waist circumference. Results: Higher obesity severity (level II odds ratio [OR], 1.32 [95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.60]; level III OR, 1.63 [1.25–2.14] vs level I) and duration (by number of visits: two visits OR, 4.43 [3.54–5.53]; three visits OR, 5.29 [4.21–6.63]; four visits OR, 5.73 [4.52–7.27]; five visits OR, 6.15 [4.19–9.03] vs one visit duration of obesity) were both associated with a higher odds of incident metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: Both duration and severity of obesity are positively associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting that metabolically healthy obesity is a transient state in the pathway to cardiometabolic disease. Weight loss should be recommended to all individuals with obesity, including those who are currently defined as metabolically healthy. Obesity severity and duration are associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting metabolically healthy obesity is transient and additional exposure to obesity leads to metabolic syndrome.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0021-972X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0021-972X
  • 1945-7197
url: Link


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titleObesity Severity and Duration Are Associated With Incident Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence Against Metabolically Healthy Obesity From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
creatorMongraw-Chaffin, Morgana ; Foster, Meredith C ; Kalyani, Rita R ; Vaidya, Dhananjay ; Burke, Gregory L ; Woodward, Mark ; Anderson, Cheryl A.M
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descriptionContext: Although the health risks of obesity compared to normal weight have been well studied, the cumulative risk associated with chronic obesity remains unknown. Specifically, debate continues about the importance of recommending weight loss for those with metabolically healthy obesity. Objective: We hypothesized that relatively greater severity and longer duration of obesity are associated with greater incident metabolic syndrome. Design, Setting, Participants, and Measures: Using repeated measures logistic regression with random effects, we investigated the association of time-varying obesity severity and duration with incident metabolic syndrome in 2,748 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants with obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) at any visit. Obesity duration was defined as the cumulative number of visits with measured obesity and obesity severity by the World Health Organization levels I–III based on body mass index. Metabolic syndrome was defined using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified to exclude waist circumference. Results: Higher obesity severity (level II odds ratio [OR], 1.32 [95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.60]; level III OR, 1.63 [1.25–2.14] vs level I) and duration (by number of visits: two visits OR, 4.43 [3.54–5.53]; three visits OR, 5.29 [4.21–6.63]; four visits OR, 5.73 [4.52–7.27]; five visits OR, 6.15 [4.19–9.03] vs one visit duration of obesity) were both associated with a higher odds of incident metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: Both duration and severity of obesity are positively associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting that metabolically healthy obesity is a transient state in the pathway to cardiometabolic disease. Weight loss should be recommended to all individuals with obesity, including those who are currently defined as metabolically healthy. Obesity severity and duration are associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting metabolically healthy obesity is transient and additional exposure to obesity leads to metabolic syndrome.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Aged ; Atherosclerosis - ethnology ; Body Mass Index ; Female ; Humans ; Longitudinal Studies ; macromolecular substances ; Male ; Metabolic Syndrome - diagnosis ; Metabolic Syndrome - ethnology ; Metabolic Syndrome - etiology ; Middle Aged ; Obesity - complications ; Obesity - diagnosis ; Obesity - ethnology ; Obesity, Metabolically Benign - complications ; Obesity, Metabolically Benign - diagnosis ; Obesity, Metabolically Benign - ethnology ; Original ; Original Articles ; Prevalence ; Severity of Illness Index ; Time Factors ; United States - ethnology
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descriptionContext: Although the health risks of obesity compared to normal weight have been well studied, the cumulative risk associated with chronic obesity remains unknown. Specifically, debate continues about the importance of recommending weight loss for those with metabolically healthy obesity. Objective: We hypothesized that relatively greater severity and longer duration of obesity are associated with greater incident metabolic syndrome. Design, Setting, Participants, and Measures: Using repeated measures logistic regression with random effects, we investigated the association of time-varying obesity severity and duration with incident metabolic syndrome in 2,748 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants with obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) at any visit. Obesity duration was defined as the cumulative number of visits with measured obesity and obesity severity by the World Health Organization levels I–III based on body mass index. Metabolic syndrome was defined using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified to exclude waist circumference. Results: Higher obesity severity (level II odds ratio [OR], 1.32 [95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.60]; level III OR, 1.63 [1.25–2.14] vs level I) and duration (by number of visits: two visits OR, 4.43 [3.54–5.53]; three visits OR, 5.29 [4.21–6.63]; four visits OR, 5.73 [4.52–7.27]; five visits OR, 6.15 [4.19–9.03] vs one visit duration of obesity) were both associated with a higher odds of incident metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: Both duration and severity of obesity are positively associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting that metabolically healthy obesity is a transient state in the pathway to cardiometabolic disease. Weight loss should be recommended to all individuals with obesity, including those who are currently defined as metabolically healthy. Obesity severity and duration are associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting metabolically healthy obesity is transient and additional exposure to obesity leads to metabolic syndrome.
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titleObesity Severity and Duration Are Associated With Incident Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence Against Metabolically Healthy Obesity From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
authorMongraw-Chaffin, Morgana ; Foster, Meredith C ; Kalyani, Rita R ; Vaidya, Dhananjay ; Burke, Gregory L ; Woodward, Mark ; Anderson, Cheryl A.M
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atitleObesity Severity and Duration Are Associated With Incident Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence Against Metabolically Healthy Obesity From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
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date2016-11
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notesThis work was supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute grants (T32HL079891 and 5T32HL007261 to M.M.-C.); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts (HHSN268201500003I, N01-HC-95159, N01-HC-95160, N01-HC-95161, N01-HC-95162, N01-HC-95163, N01-HC-95164, N01-HC-95165, N01-HC-95166, N01-HC-95167, N01-HC-95168, and N01-HC-95169); and National Center for Research Resources grants (UL1-TR-000040 and UL1-TR-001079).
abstractContext: Although the health risks of obesity compared to normal weight have been well studied, the cumulative risk associated with chronic obesity remains unknown. Specifically, debate continues about the importance of recommending weight loss for those with metabolically healthy obesity. Objective: We hypothesized that relatively greater severity and longer duration of obesity are associated with greater incident metabolic syndrome. Design, Setting, Participants, and Measures: Using repeated measures logistic regression with random effects, we investigated the association of time-varying obesity severity and duration with incident metabolic syndrome in 2,748 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants with obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) at any visit. Obesity duration was defined as the cumulative number of visits with measured obesity and obesity severity by the World Health Organization levels I–III based on body mass index. Metabolic syndrome was defined using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified to exclude waist circumference. Results: Higher obesity severity (level II odds ratio [OR], 1.32 [95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.60]; level III OR, 1.63 [1.25–2.14] vs level I) and duration (by number of visits: two visits OR, 4.43 [3.54–5.53]; three visits OR, 5.29 [4.21–6.63]; four visits OR, 5.73 [4.52–7.27]; five visits OR, 6.15 [4.19–9.03] vs one visit duration of obesity) were both associated with a higher odds of incident metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: Both duration and severity of obesity are positively associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting that metabolically healthy obesity is a transient state in the pathway to cardiometabolic disease. Weight loss should be recommended to all individuals with obesity, including those who are currently defined as metabolically healthy. Obesity severity and duration are associated with incident metabolic syndrome, suggesting metabolically healthy obesity is transient and additional exposure to obesity leads to metabolic syndrome.
copUnited States
pubEndocrine Society
pmid27552544
doi10.1210/jc.2016-2460
oafree_for_read