schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Oral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial

Aims/hypothesis We previously reported that obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome (at risk), compared with obese individuals without the metabolic syndrome (healthy obese), have elevated serum AGEs that strongly correlate with insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. We hypothe... Full description

Journal Title: Diabetologia 2016-07-29, Vol.59 (10), p.2181-2192
Main Author: Vlassara, Helen
Other Authors: Cai, Weijing , Tripp, Elizabeth , Pyzik, Renata , Yee, Kalle , Goldberg, Laurie , Tansman, Laurie , Chen, Xue , Mani, Venkatesh , Fayad, Zahi A , Nadkarni, Girish N , Striker, Gary E , He, John C , Uribarri, Jaime
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
ID: ISSN: 0012-186X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27468708
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5129175
title: Oral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial
format: Article
creator:
  • Vlassara, Helen
  • Cai, Weijing
  • Tripp, Elizabeth
  • Pyzik, Renata
  • Yee, Kalle
  • Goldberg, Laurie
  • Tansman, Laurie
  • Chen, Xue
  • Mani, Venkatesh
  • Fayad, Zahi A
  • Nadkarni, Girish N
  • Striker, Gary E
  • He, John C
  • Uribarri, Jaime
subjects:
  • 3T3-L1 Cells
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • AGER1
  • Animals
  • Article
  • Blood Glucose - drug effects
  • Blotting, Western
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
  • Diabetes therapy
  • Female
  • Glycation End Products, Advanced - therapeutic use
  • Glycotoxins
  • Human Physiology
  • Humans
  • Inflammation
  • Inflammation - blood
  • Inflammation - drug therapy
  • Innate defence
  • Insulin - blood
  • Insulin resistance
  • Insulin Resistance - genetics
  • Insulin Resistance - physiology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Male
  • Medicine
  • Medicine & Public Health
  • Metabolic Diseases
  • Metabolic Syndrome - blood
  • Metabolic Syndrome - drug therapy
  • Mice
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity
  • Obesity - genetics
  • Obesity - metabolism
  • Oxidative Stress - drug effects
  • Oxidative Stress - genetics
  • RAGE
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Risk Factors
  • SIRT1
  • Waist Circumference - drug effects
  • Waist Circumference - genetics
ispartof: Diabetologia, 2016-07-29, Vol.59 (10), p.2181-2192
description: Aims/hypothesis We previously reported that obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome (at risk), compared with obese individuals without the metabolic syndrome (healthy obese), have elevated serum AGEs that strongly correlate with insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. We hypothesised that a diet low in AGEs (L-AGE) would improve components of the metabolic syndrome in obese individuals, confirming high AGEs as a new risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. Methods A randomised 1 year trial was conducted in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome in two parallel groups: L-AGE diet vs a regular diet, habitually high in AGEs (Reg-AGE). Participants were allocated to each group by randomisation using random permuted blocks. At baseline and at the end of the trial, we obtained anthropometric variables, blood and urine samples, and performed OGTTs and MRI measurements of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal tissue and carotid artery. Only investigators involved in laboratory determinations were blinded to dietary assignment. Effects on insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were the primary outcome. Results Sixty-one individuals were randomised to a Reg-AGE diet and 77 to an L-AGE diet; the data of 49 and 51, respectively, were analysed at the study end in 2014. The L-AGE diet markedly improved insulin resistance; modestly decreased body weight; lowered AGEs, oxidative stress and inflammation; and enhanced the protective factors sirtuin 1, AGE receptor 1 and glyoxalase I. The Reg-AGE diet raised AGEs and markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. There were no effects on MRI-assessed measurements. No side effects from the intervention were identified. HOMA-IR came down from 3.1 ± 1.8 to 1.9 ± 1.3 ( p  
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-186X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0012-186X
  • 1432-0428
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.6873028
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_pubme
recordidTN_cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5129175
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA462909865
sourcerecordidA462909865
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1612t-95abe9e34ca597bd74439f5622c38cb49fa992d90033a5d6e0ecb0413bbda8d20
addsrcrecordideNqNUk1v1DAUjBCILoUfwAVF4sIlxXb8EXNAWlWlRarUC0jcLMd-2XXl2Iud7ceZP46jlKqtBEI5xPKbmbyZTFW9xegIIyQ-ZoQwYQ3CvKGItc3Ns2qFaUsaREn3vFrN4wZ3_MdB9SrnS4RQyyh_WR0QQXknULeqfl0k7ev16UmdIE_JmcnFUOsRvItJT5BrF_LeuzDPXZ50MFCu6thDng_WXTm71z7X127a1tMW6hEm3UfvTJ1vg01xhE-1rpMONo4ug61NDFOK3pdj-aL2r6sXQ1GAN3fvw-r7l5Nvx2fN-cXp1-P1eYM5JlMjme5BQkuNZlL0VlDayoFxQkzbmZ7KQUtJrCwuW80sBwSmRxS3fW91Zwk6rD4vurt9P4I1UNbQXu2SG3W6VVE79XgS3FZt4pVimEgsWBE4WwTiDoJ2CR5xbYBJRasIF4owzHvDLWeIdu3AKbUSGLeYCmQI0kXqw90uKf7cl-hVycaA9zpA3GeFOyIkbrlA_wNFJRCKcIG-fwK9jPsUSqgFhYVghMg5h6MFtdEelAtDLG5NeSyMrvwcGFy5X1NOJJIdn33jhWBSzDnBcO8bIzU3US1NVKWJam6iuimcdw_Dvmf8qV4BiCeixk16rl_Zxvl_SpOFmYto2EB64PKvpN_1B_wz
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1817752292
display
typearticle
titleOral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial
creatorVlassara, Helen ; Cai, Weijing ; Tripp, Elizabeth ; Pyzik, Renata ; Yee, Kalle ; Goldberg, Laurie ; Tansman, Laurie ; Chen, Xue ; Mani, Venkatesh ; Fayad, Zahi A ; Nadkarni, Girish N ; Striker, Gary E ; He, John C ; Uribarri, Jaime
creatorcontribVlassara, Helen ; Cai, Weijing ; Tripp, Elizabeth ; Pyzik, Renata ; Yee, Kalle ; Goldberg, Laurie ; Tansman, Laurie ; Chen, Xue ; Mani, Venkatesh ; Fayad, Zahi A ; Nadkarni, Girish N ; Striker, Gary E ; He, John C ; Uribarri, Jaime
descriptionAims/hypothesis We previously reported that obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome (at risk), compared with obese individuals without the metabolic syndrome (healthy obese), have elevated serum AGEs that strongly correlate with insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. We hypothesised that a diet low in AGEs (L-AGE) would improve components of the metabolic syndrome in obese individuals, confirming high AGEs as a new risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. Methods A randomised 1 year trial was conducted in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome in two parallel groups: L-AGE diet vs a regular diet, habitually high in AGEs (Reg-AGE). Participants were allocated to each group by randomisation using random permuted blocks. At baseline and at the end of the trial, we obtained anthropometric variables, blood and urine samples, and performed OGTTs and MRI measurements of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal tissue and carotid artery. Only investigators involved in laboratory determinations were blinded to dietary assignment. Effects on insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were the primary outcome. Results Sixty-one individuals were randomised to a Reg-AGE diet and 77 to an L-AGE diet; the data of 49 and 51, respectively, were analysed at the study end in 2014. The L-AGE diet markedly improved insulin resistance; modestly decreased body weight; lowered AGEs, oxidative stress and inflammation; and enhanced the protective factors sirtuin 1, AGE receptor 1 and glyoxalase I. The Reg-AGE diet raised AGEs and markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. There were no effects on MRI-assessed measurements. No side effects from the intervention were identified. HOMA-IR came down from 3.1 ± 1.8 to 1.9 ± 1.3 ( p  < 0.001) in the L-AGE group, while it increased from 2.9 ± 1.2 to 3.6 ± 1.7 ( p  < 0.002) in the Reg-AGE group. Conclusions / interpretation L-AGE ameliorates insulin resistance in obese people with the metabolic syndrome, and may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, without necessitating a major reduction in adiposity. Elevated serum AGEs may be used to diagnose and treat ‘at-risk’ obesity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01363141 Funding The study was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (DK091231)
identifier
0ISSN: 0012-186X
1EISSN: 1432-0428
2DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-4053-x
3PMID: 27468708
languageeng
publisherBerlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
subject3T3-L1 Cells ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; AGER1 ; Animals ; Article ; Blood Glucose - drug effects ; Blotting, Western ; Cardiovascular disease ; Diabetes ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy ; Diabetes therapy ; Female ; Glycation End Products, Advanced - therapeutic use ; Glycotoxins ; Human Physiology ; Humans ; Inflammation ; Inflammation - blood ; Inflammation - drug therapy ; Innate defence ; Insulin - blood ; Insulin resistance ; Insulin Resistance - genetics ; Insulin Resistance - physiology ; Internal Medicine ; Male ; Medicine ; Medicine & Public Health ; Metabolic Diseases ; Metabolic Syndrome - blood ; Metabolic Syndrome - drug therapy ; Mice ; Middle Aged ; Obesity ; Obesity - genetics ; Obesity - metabolism ; Oxidative Stress - drug effects ; Oxidative Stress - genetics ; RAGE ; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Risk Factors ; SIRT1 ; Waist Circumference - drug effects ; Waist Circumference - genetics
ispartofDiabetologia, 2016-07-29, Vol.59 (10), p.2181-2192
rights
0Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016
1COPYRIGHT 2016 Springer
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1612t-95abe9e34ca597bd74439f5622c38cb49fa992d90033a5d6e0ecb0413bbda8d20
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1612t-95abe9e34ca597bd74439f5622c38cb49fa992d90033a5d6e0ecb0413bbda8d20
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27468708$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Vlassara, Helen
1Cai, Weijing
2Tripp, Elizabeth
3Pyzik, Renata
4Yee, Kalle
5Goldberg, Laurie
6Tansman, Laurie
7Chen, Xue
8Mani, Venkatesh
9Fayad, Zahi A
10Nadkarni, Girish N
11Striker, Gary E
12He, John C
13Uribarri, Jaime
title
0Oral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial
1Diabetologia
addtitle
0Diabetologia
1Diabetologia
descriptionAims/hypothesis We previously reported that obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome (at risk), compared with obese individuals without the metabolic syndrome (healthy obese), have elevated serum AGEs that strongly correlate with insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. We hypothesised that a diet low in AGEs (L-AGE) would improve components of the metabolic syndrome in obese individuals, confirming high AGEs as a new risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. Methods A randomised 1 year trial was conducted in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome in two parallel groups: L-AGE diet vs a regular diet, habitually high in AGEs (Reg-AGE). Participants were allocated to each group by randomisation using random permuted blocks. At baseline and at the end of the trial, we obtained anthropometric variables, blood and urine samples, and performed OGTTs and MRI measurements of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal tissue and carotid artery. Only investigators involved in laboratory determinations were blinded to dietary assignment. Effects on insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were the primary outcome. Results Sixty-one individuals were randomised to a Reg-AGE diet and 77 to an L-AGE diet; the data of 49 and 51, respectively, were analysed at the study end in 2014. The L-AGE diet markedly improved insulin resistance; modestly decreased body weight; lowered AGEs, oxidative stress and inflammation; and enhanced the protective factors sirtuin 1, AGE receptor 1 and glyoxalase I. The Reg-AGE diet raised AGEs and markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. There were no effects on MRI-assessed measurements. No side effects from the intervention were identified. HOMA-IR came down from 3.1 ± 1.8 to 1.9 ± 1.3 ( p  < 0.001) in the L-AGE group, while it increased from 2.9 ± 1.2 to 3.6 ± 1.7 ( p  < 0.002) in the Reg-AGE group. Conclusions / interpretation L-AGE ameliorates insulin resistance in obese people with the metabolic syndrome, and may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, without necessitating a major reduction in adiposity. Elevated serum AGEs may be used to diagnose and treat ‘at-risk’ obesity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01363141 Funding The study was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (DK091231)
subject
03T3-L1 Cells
1Aged
2Aged, 80 and over
3AGER1
4Animals
5Article
6Blood Glucose - drug effects
7Blotting, Western
8Cardiovascular disease
9Diabetes
10Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
11Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
12Diabetes therapy
13Female
14Glycation End Products, Advanced - therapeutic use
15Glycotoxins
16Human Physiology
17Humans
18Inflammation
19Inflammation - blood
20Inflammation - drug therapy
21Innate defence
22Insulin - blood
23Insulin resistance
24Insulin Resistance - genetics
25Insulin Resistance - physiology
26Internal Medicine
27Male
28Medicine
29Medicine & Public Health
30Metabolic Diseases
31Metabolic Syndrome - blood
32Metabolic Syndrome - drug therapy
33Mice
34Middle Aged
35Obesity
36Obesity - genetics
37Obesity - metabolism
38Oxidative Stress - drug effects
39Oxidative Stress - genetics
40RAGE
41Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
42Risk Factors
43SIRT1
44Waist Circumference - drug effects
45Waist Circumference - genetics
issn
00012-186X
11432-0428
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2016
recordtypearticle
recordideNqNUk1v1DAUjBCILoUfwAVF4sIlxXb8EXNAWlWlRarUC0jcLMd-2XXl2Iud7ceZP46jlKqtBEI5xPKbmbyZTFW9xegIIyQ-ZoQwYQ3CvKGItc3Ns2qFaUsaREn3vFrN4wZ3_MdB9SrnS4RQyyh_WR0QQXknULeqfl0k7ev16UmdIE_JmcnFUOsRvItJT5BrF_LeuzDPXZ50MFCu6thDng_WXTm71z7X127a1tMW6hEm3UfvTJ1vg01xhE-1rpMONo4ug61NDFOK3pdj-aL2r6sXQ1GAN3fvw-r7l5Nvx2fN-cXp1-P1eYM5JlMjme5BQkuNZlL0VlDayoFxQkzbmZ7KQUtJrCwuW80sBwSmRxS3fW91Zwk6rD4vurt9P4I1UNbQXu2SG3W6VVE79XgS3FZt4pVimEgsWBE4WwTiDoJ2CR5xbYBJRasIF4owzHvDLWeIdu3AKbUSGLeYCmQI0kXqw90uKf7cl-hVycaA9zpA3GeFOyIkbrlA_wNFJRCKcIG-fwK9jPsUSqgFhYVghMg5h6MFtdEelAtDLG5NeSyMrvwcGFy5X1NOJJIdn33jhWBSzDnBcO8bIzU3US1NVKWJam6iuimcdw_Dvmf8qV4BiCeixk16rl_Zxvl_SpOFmYto2EB64PKvpN_1B_wz
startdate20160729
enddate20160729
creator
0Vlassara, Helen
1Cai, Weijing
2Tripp, Elizabeth
3Pyzik, Renata
4Yee, Kalle
5Goldberg, Laurie
6Tansman, Laurie
7Chen, Xue
8Mani, Venkatesh
9Fayad, Zahi A
10Nadkarni, Girish N
11Striker, Gary E
12He, John C
13Uribarri, Jaime
general
0Springer Berlin Heidelberg
1Springer
2Springer Nature B.V
scope
0CGR
1CUY
2CVF
3ECM
4EIF
5NPM
6AAYXX
7CITATION
8BSHEE
93V.
107T5
117X7
127XB
1388E
148AO
158C1
168FI
178FJ
188FK
19ABUWG
20BENPR
21FYUFA
22GHDGH
23H94
24K9.
25M0S
26M1P
27PQEST
28PQQKQ
29PQUKI
30PRINS
317X8
32BOBZL
33CLFQK
345PM
sort
creationdate20160729
titleOral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial
authorVlassara, Helen ; Cai, Weijing ; Tripp, Elizabeth ; Pyzik, Renata ; Yee, Kalle ; Goldberg, Laurie ; Tansman, Laurie ; Chen, Xue ; Mani, Venkatesh ; Fayad, Zahi A ; Nadkarni, Girish N ; Striker, Gary E ; He, John C ; Uribarri, Jaime
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1612t-95abe9e34ca597bd74439f5622c38cb49fa992d90033a5d6e0ecb0413bbda8d20
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2016
topic
03T3-L1 Cells
1Aged
2Aged, 80 and over
3AGER1
4Animals
5Article
6Blood Glucose - drug effects
7Blotting, Western
8Cardiovascular disease
9Diabetes
10Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
11Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
12Diabetes therapy
13Female
14Glycation End Products, Advanced - therapeutic use
15Glycotoxins
16Human Physiology
17Humans
18Inflammation
19Inflammation - blood
20Inflammation - drug therapy
21Innate defence
22Insulin - blood
23Insulin resistance
24Insulin Resistance - genetics
25Insulin Resistance - physiology
26Internal Medicine
27Male
28Medicine
29Medicine & Public Health
30Metabolic Diseases
31Metabolic Syndrome - blood
32Metabolic Syndrome - drug therapy
33Mice
34Middle Aged
35Obesity
36Obesity - genetics
37Obesity - metabolism
38Oxidative Stress - drug effects
39Oxidative Stress - genetics
40RAGE
41Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
42Risk Factors
43SIRT1
44Waist Circumference - drug effects
45Waist Circumference - genetics
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Vlassara, Helen
1Cai, Weijing
2Tripp, Elizabeth
3Pyzik, Renata
4Yee, Kalle
5Goldberg, Laurie
6Tansman, Laurie
7Chen, Xue
8Mani, Venkatesh
9Fayad, Zahi A
10Nadkarni, Girish N
11Striker, Gary E
12He, John C
13Uribarri, Jaime
collection
0Medline
1MEDLINE
2MEDLINE (Ovid)
3MEDLINE
4MEDLINE
5PubMed
6CrossRef
7Academic OneFile (A&I only)
8ProQuest Central (Corporate)
9Immunology Abstracts
10Health & Medical Collection
11ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
12Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
13ProQuest Pharma Collection
14Public Health Database
15Hospital Premium Collection
16Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
17ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
18ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
19ProQuest Central
20Health Research Premium Collection
21Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
22AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts
23ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
24Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
25Medical Database
26ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
27ProQuest One Academic
28ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
29ProQuest Central China
30MEDLINE - Academic
31OpenAIRE (Open Access)
32OpenAIRE
33PubMed Central (Full Participant titles)
jtitleDiabetologia
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Vlassara, Helen
1Cai, Weijing
2Tripp, Elizabeth
3Pyzik, Renata
4Yee, Kalle
5Goldberg, Laurie
6Tansman, Laurie
7Chen, Xue
8Mani, Venkatesh
9Fayad, Zahi A
10Nadkarni, Girish N
11Striker, Gary E
12He, John C
13Uribarri, Jaime
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleOral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial
jtitleDiabetologia
stitleDiabetologia
addtitleDiabetologia
date2016-07-29
risdate2016
volume59
issue10
spage2181
epage2192
pages2181-2192
issn0012-186X
eissn1432-0428
abstractAims/hypothesis We previously reported that obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome (at risk), compared with obese individuals without the metabolic syndrome (healthy obese), have elevated serum AGEs that strongly correlate with insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. We hypothesised that a diet low in AGEs (L-AGE) would improve components of the metabolic syndrome in obese individuals, confirming high AGEs as a new risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. Methods A randomised 1 year trial was conducted in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome in two parallel groups: L-AGE diet vs a regular diet, habitually high in AGEs (Reg-AGE). Participants were allocated to each group by randomisation using random permuted blocks. At baseline and at the end of the trial, we obtained anthropometric variables, blood and urine samples, and performed OGTTs and MRI measurements of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal tissue and carotid artery. Only investigators involved in laboratory determinations were blinded to dietary assignment. Effects on insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were the primary outcome. Results Sixty-one individuals were randomised to a Reg-AGE diet and 77 to an L-AGE diet; the data of 49 and 51, respectively, were analysed at the study end in 2014. The L-AGE diet markedly improved insulin resistance; modestly decreased body weight; lowered AGEs, oxidative stress and inflammation; and enhanced the protective factors sirtuin 1, AGE receptor 1 and glyoxalase I. The Reg-AGE diet raised AGEs and markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and inflammation. There were no effects on MRI-assessed measurements. No side effects from the intervention were identified. HOMA-IR came down from 3.1 ± 1.8 to 1.9 ± 1.3 ( p  < 0.001) in the L-AGE group, while it increased from 2.9 ± 1.2 to 3.6 ± 1.7 ( p  < 0.002) in the Reg-AGE group. Conclusions / interpretation L-AGE ameliorates insulin resistance in obese people with the metabolic syndrome, and may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, without necessitating a major reduction in adiposity. Elevated serum AGEs may be used to diagnose and treat ‘at-risk’ obesity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01363141 Funding The study was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (DK091231)
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
pmid27468708
doi10.1007/s00125-016-4053-x
oafree_for_read