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The Rhesus Monkey Connectome Predicts Disrupted Functional Networks Resulting from Pharmacogenetic Inactivation of the Amygdala

Contemporary research suggests that the mammalian brain is a complex system, implying that damage to even a single functional area could have widespread consequences across the system. To test this hypothesis, we pharmacogenetically inactivated the rhesus monkey amygdala, a subcortical region with d... Full description

Journal Title: Neuron (Cambridge Mass.), 2016-07-20, Vol.91 (2), p.453-466
Main Author: Grayson, David S
Other Authors: Bliss-Moreau, Eliza , Machado, Christopher J , Bennett, Jeffrey , Shen, Kelly , Grant, Kathleen A , Fair, Damien A , Amaral, David G
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0896-6273
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477019
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5233431
title: The Rhesus Monkey Connectome Predicts Disrupted Functional Networks Resulting from Pharmacogenetic Inactivation of the Amygdala
format: Article
creator:
  • Grayson, David S
  • Bliss-Moreau, Eliza
  • Machado, Christopher J
  • Bennett, Jeffrey
  • Shen, Kelly
  • Grant, Kathleen A
  • Fair, Damien A
  • Amaral, David G
subjects:
  • Amygdala - physiopathology
  • Analysis
  • Animal behavior
  • Animals
  • Article
  • Brain research
  • Communication
  • Connectome - methods
  • Macaca mulatta
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
  • Male
  • Medical imaging
  • Methyltransferases
  • Models, Neurological
  • Nerve Net - physiology
  • Nerve Net - physiopathology
  • Neural Pathways - physiopathology
  • Neurons
  • Neurophysiology
  • Pharmacogenetics - methods
  • Primates
  • Psychophysiology
  • Research institutes
  • Rodents
ispartof: Neuron (Cambridge, Mass.), 2016-07-20, Vol.91 (2), p.453-466
description: Contemporary research suggests that the mammalian brain is a complex system, implying that damage to even a single functional area could have widespread consequences across the system. To test this hypothesis, we pharmacogenetically inactivated the rhesus monkey amygdala, a subcortical region with distributed and well-defined cortical connectivity. We then examined the impact of that perturbation on global network organization using resting-state functional connectivity MRI. Amygdala inactivation disrupted amygdalocortical communication and distributed corticocortical coupling across multiple functional brain systems. Altered coupling was explained using a graph-based analysis of experimentally established structural connectivity to simulate disconnection of the amygdala. Communication capacity via monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways, in aggregate, largely accounted for the correlational structure of endogenous brain activity and many of the non-local changes that resulted from amygdala inactivation. These results highlight the structural basis of distributed neural activity and suggest a strategy for linking focal neuropathology to remote neurophysiological changes. •The amygdala was remotely inactivated using the DREADDs technique•Coupled activity was disrupted throughout cortical networks involving the amygdala•Altered global dynamics increased coupling between other topologically distant areas•Simulated anatomical lesions are correlated with diverse network effects Grayson et al. (2016) show that inactivating a single region, the amygdala, disrupts communication throughout the cortex and alters global brain network behavior. Simulated amygdala lesions produced similar network effects, suggesting that focal neuropathology can be inferred from distributed brain activity.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0896-6273
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0896-6273
  • 1097-4199
url: Link


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descriptionContemporary research suggests that the mammalian brain is a complex system, implying that damage to even a single functional area could have widespread consequences across the system. To test this hypothesis, we pharmacogenetically inactivated the rhesus monkey amygdala, a subcortical region with distributed and well-defined cortical connectivity. We then examined the impact of that perturbation on global network organization using resting-state functional connectivity MRI. Amygdala inactivation disrupted amygdalocortical communication and distributed corticocortical coupling across multiple functional brain systems. Altered coupling was explained using a graph-based analysis of experimentally established structural connectivity to simulate disconnection of the amygdala. Communication capacity via monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways, in aggregate, largely accounted for the correlational structure of endogenous brain activity and many of the non-local changes that resulted from amygdala inactivation. These results highlight the structural basis of distributed neural activity and suggest a strategy for linking focal neuropathology to remote neurophysiological changes. •The amygdala was remotely inactivated using the DREADDs technique•Coupled activity was disrupted throughout cortical networks involving the amygdala•Altered global dynamics increased coupling between other topologically distant areas•Simulated anatomical lesions are correlated with diverse network effects Grayson et al. (2016) show that inactivating a single region, the amygdala, disrupts communication throughout the cortex and alters global brain network behavior. Simulated amygdala lesions produced similar network effects, suggesting that focal neuropathology can be inferred from distributed brain activity.
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subjectAmygdala - physiopathology ; Analysis ; Animal behavior ; Animals ; Article ; Brain research ; Communication ; Connectome - methods ; Macaca mulatta ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods ; Male ; Medical imaging ; Methyltransferases ; Models, Neurological ; Nerve Net - physiology ; Nerve Net - physiopathology ; Neural Pathways - physiopathology ; Neurons ; Neurophysiology ; Pharmacogenetics - methods ; Primates ; Psychophysiology ; Research institutes ; Rodents
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titleThe Rhesus Monkey Connectome Predicts Disrupted Functional Networks Resulting from Pharmacogenetic Inactivation of the Amygdala
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abstractContemporary research suggests that the mammalian brain is a complex system, implying that damage to even a single functional area could have widespread consequences across the system. To test this hypothesis, we pharmacogenetically inactivated the rhesus monkey amygdala, a subcortical region with distributed and well-defined cortical connectivity. We then examined the impact of that perturbation on global network organization using resting-state functional connectivity MRI. Amygdala inactivation disrupted amygdalocortical communication and distributed corticocortical coupling across multiple functional brain systems. Altered coupling was explained using a graph-based analysis of experimentally established structural connectivity to simulate disconnection of the amygdala. Communication capacity via monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways, in aggregate, largely accounted for the correlational structure of endogenous brain activity and many of the non-local changes that resulted from amygdala inactivation. These results highlight the structural basis of distributed neural activity and suggest a strategy for linking focal neuropathology to remote neurophysiological changes. •The amygdala was remotely inactivated using the DREADDs technique•Coupled activity was disrupted throughout cortical networks involving the amygdala•Altered global dynamics increased coupling between other topologically distant areas•Simulated anatomical lesions are correlated with diverse network effects Grayson et al. (2016) show that inactivating a single region, the amygdala, disrupts communication throughout the cortex and alters global brain network behavior. Simulated amygdala lesions produced similar network effects, suggesting that focal neuropathology can be inferred from distributed brain activity.
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