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Plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations after plant sterol and plant stanol consumption: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Purpose Plant sterols and stanols interfere with intestinal cholesterol absorption, and it has been questioned whether absorption and plasma concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids are also affected. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of plant sterol and stanol consump... Full description

Journal Title: European Journal of Nutrition 2017-04, Vol.56 (3), p.909-923
Main Author: Baumgartner, Sabine
Other Authors: Ras, Rouyanne T , Trautwein, Elke A , Mensink, Ronald P , Plat, Jogchum
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Fat
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
ID: ISSN: 1436-6207
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27591863
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title: Plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations after plant sterol and plant stanol consumption: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
format: Article
creator:
  • Baumgartner, Sabine
  • Ras, Rouyanne T
  • Trautwein, Elke A
  • Mensink, Ronald P
  • Plat, Jogchum
subjects:
  • Alfacalcidol
  • ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL
  • Analysis
  • Anticholesteremic agents
  • ANTIOXIDANT CONCENTRATIONS
  • Beta carotene
  • beverages
  • Calcifediol
  • Carotenoids - blood
  • Chemistry
  • Chemistry and Materials Science
  • Cholesterol
  • Cholesterol - blood
  • Databases, Factual
  • DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL
  • Diet
  • Dietetics
  • ESTER-ENRICHED MARGARINES
  • Fat
  • Fat-soluble vitamins
  • Fatsoluble vitamins
  • food
  • Humans
  • Hydrocarbon carotenoids
  • LDL-CHOLESTEROL
  • LIPID PROFILE
  • Lycopene
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • MILDLY HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC SUBJECTS
  • Nutrition
  • Oxygenated carotenoids
  • Phytosterols
  • Phytosterols - administration & dosage
  • PLACEBO-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • Plant stanols
  • Plant sterols
  • PROSTATE-CANCER RISK
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Retinoids
  • Review
  • SERUM-CHOLESTEROL CONCENTRATIONS
  • soluble vitamins
  • Tocopherols
  • Tocopherols - blood
  • Vitamin A - blood
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin D - blood
  • Vitamins - blood
ispartof: European Journal of Nutrition, 2017-04, Vol.56 (3), p.909-923
description: Purpose Plant sterols and stanols interfere with intestinal cholesterol absorption, and it has been questioned whether absorption and plasma concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids are also affected. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of plant sterol and stanol consumption on plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations. Methods Forty-one randomized controlled trials involving 3306 subjects were included. Weighted absolute and relative changes of non-standardized and total cholesterol (TC)-standardized values (expressed as summary estimates and 95 % CIs) were calculated for three fat-soluble vitamins (α- and γ-tocopherol, retinol and vitamin D) and six carotenoids (β-carotene, α-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin) using a random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using predefined subject and treatment characteristics. Results Average plant sterol or stanol intake was 2.5 g/d. Relative non-standardized and TC-standardized concentrations of β-carotene decreased by, respectively, −16.3 % (95 % CI −18.3; −14.3) and −10.1 % (−12.3; −8.0), α-carotene by −14.4 % (−17.5; 11.3) and −7.8 % (−11.3; −4.3), and lycopene by −12.3 % (−14.6; −10.1) and −6.3 % (−8.6; −4.0). Lutein concentrations decreased by −7.4 % (−10.1; −4.8), while TC-standardized concentrations were not changed. For zeaxanthin, these values were −12.9 % (−18.9; −6.8) and −7.7 % (−13.8; −1.7) and for β-cryptoxanthin −10.6 % (−14.3; −6.9) and −4.8 % (−8.7; −0.9). Non-standardized α-tocopherol concentrations decreased by −7.1 % (−8.0; −6.2) and γ-tocopherol by −6.9 % (−9.8; −3.9), while TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations were not changed. Non-standardized retinol and vitamin D concentrations were not affected. Results were not affected by baseline concentrations, dose, duration and type of plant sterols/stanols, except for significant effects of duration (≤4 vs. >4 weeks) on TC-standardized lutein concentrations (1.0 vs. −5.6 %) and type of plant sterol/stanol on TC-standardized β-carotene concentrations (−8.9 vs. −14.2 %). Conclusions Plant sterol and stanol intake lowers TC-standardized hydrocarbon carotenoid concentrations, differently affects TC-standardized oxygenated carotenoid concentrations, but does not affect TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations or absolute retinol and vitamin D concentrations. Observed concentrations remained within normal ranges.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1436-6207
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1436-6207
  • 1436-6215
url: Link


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titlePlasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations after plant sterol and plant stanol consumption: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
creatorBaumgartner, Sabine ; Ras, Rouyanne T ; Trautwein, Elke A ; Mensink, Ronald P ; Plat, Jogchum
creatorcontribBaumgartner, Sabine ; Ras, Rouyanne T ; Trautwein, Elke A ; Mensink, Ronald P ; Plat, Jogchum
descriptionPurpose Plant sterols and stanols interfere with intestinal cholesterol absorption, and it has been questioned whether absorption and plasma concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids are also affected. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of plant sterol and stanol consumption on plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations. Methods Forty-one randomized controlled trials involving 3306 subjects were included. Weighted absolute and relative changes of non-standardized and total cholesterol (TC)-standardized values (expressed as summary estimates and 95 % CIs) were calculated for three fat-soluble vitamins (α- and γ-tocopherol, retinol and vitamin D) and six carotenoids (β-carotene, α-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin) using a random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using predefined subject and treatment characteristics. Results Average plant sterol or stanol intake was 2.5 g/d. Relative non-standardized and TC-standardized concentrations of β-carotene decreased by, respectively, −16.3 % (95 % CI −18.3; −14.3) and −10.1 % (−12.3; −8.0), α-carotene by −14.4 % (−17.5; 11.3) and −7.8 % (−11.3; −4.3), and lycopene by −12.3 % (−14.6; −10.1) and −6.3 % (−8.6; −4.0). Lutein concentrations decreased by −7.4 % (−10.1; −4.8), while TC-standardized concentrations were not changed. For zeaxanthin, these values were −12.9 % (−18.9; −6.8) and −7.7 % (−13.8; −1.7) and for β-cryptoxanthin −10.6 % (−14.3; −6.9) and −4.8 % (−8.7; −0.9). Non-standardized α-tocopherol concentrations decreased by −7.1 % (−8.0; −6.2) and γ-tocopherol by −6.9 % (−9.8; −3.9), while TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations were not changed. Non-standardized retinol and vitamin D concentrations were not affected. Results were not affected by baseline concentrations, dose, duration and type of plant sterols/stanols, except for significant effects of duration (≤4 vs. >4 weeks) on TC-standardized lutein concentrations (1.0 vs. −5.6 %) and type of plant sterol/stanol on TC-standardized β-carotene concentrations (−8.9 vs. −14.2 %). Conclusions Plant sterol and stanol intake lowers TC-standardized hydrocarbon carotenoid concentrations, differently affects TC-standardized oxygenated carotenoid concentrations, but does not affect TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations or absolute retinol and vitamin D concentrations. Observed concentrations remained within normal ranges.
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languageeng
publisherBerlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
subjectAlfacalcidol ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; Analysis ; Anticholesteremic agents ; ANTIOXIDANT CONCENTRATIONS ; Beta carotene ; beverages ; Calcifediol ; Carotenoids - blood ; Chemistry ; Chemistry and Materials Science ; Cholesterol ; Cholesterol - blood ; Databases, Factual ; DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL ; Diet ; Dietetics ; ESTER-ENRICHED MARGARINES ; Fat ; Fat-soluble vitamins ; Fatsoluble vitamins ; food ; Humans ; Hydrocarbon carotenoids ; LDL-CHOLESTEROL ; LIPID PROFILE ; Lycopene ; Medicine (miscellaneous) ; MILDLY HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC SUBJECTS ; Nutrition ; Oxygenated carotenoids ; Phytosterols ; Phytosterols - administration & dosage ; PLACEBO-CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; Plant stanols ; Plant sterols ; PROSTATE-CANCER RISK ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Retinoids ; Review ; SERUM-CHOLESTEROL CONCENTRATIONS ; soluble vitamins ; Tocopherols ; Tocopherols - blood ; Vitamin A - blood ; Vitamin D ; Vitamin D - blood ; Vitamins - blood
ispartofEuropean Journal of Nutrition, 2017-04, Vol.56 (3), p.909-923
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0Baumgartner, Sabine
1Ras, Rouyanne T
2Trautwein, Elke A
3Mensink, Ronald P
4Plat, Jogchum
title
0Plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations after plant sterol and plant stanol consumption: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
1European Journal of Nutrition
addtitle
0Eur J Nutr
1Eur J Nutr
descriptionPurpose Plant sterols and stanols interfere with intestinal cholesterol absorption, and it has been questioned whether absorption and plasma concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids are also affected. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of plant sterol and stanol consumption on plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations. Methods Forty-one randomized controlled trials involving 3306 subjects were included. Weighted absolute and relative changes of non-standardized and total cholesterol (TC)-standardized values (expressed as summary estimates and 95 % CIs) were calculated for three fat-soluble vitamins (α- and γ-tocopherol, retinol and vitamin D) and six carotenoids (β-carotene, α-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin) using a random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using predefined subject and treatment characteristics. Results Average plant sterol or stanol intake was 2.5 g/d. Relative non-standardized and TC-standardized concentrations of β-carotene decreased by, respectively, −16.3 % (95 % CI −18.3; −14.3) and −10.1 % (−12.3; −8.0), α-carotene by −14.4 % (−17.5; 11.3) and −7.8 % (−11.3; −4.3), and lycopene by −12.3 % (−14.6; −10.1) and −6.3 % (−8.6; −4.0). Lutein concentrations decreased by −7.4 % (−10.1; −4.8), while TC-standardized concentrations were not changed. For zeaxanthin, these values were −12.9 % (−18.9; −6.8) and −7.7 % (−13.8; −1.7) and for β-cryptoxanthin −10.6 % (−14.3; −6.9) and −4.8 % (−8.7; −0.9). Non-standardized α-tocopherol concentrations decreased by −7.1 % (−8.0; −6.2) and γ-tocopherol by −6.9 % (−9.8; −3.9), while TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations were not changed. Non-standardized retinol and vitamin D concentrations were not affected. Results were not affected by baseline concentrations, dose, duration and type of plant sterols/stanols, except for significant effects of duration (≤4 vs. >4 weeks) on TC-standardized lutein concentrations (1.0 vs. −5.6 %) and type of plant sterol/stanol on TC-standardized β-carotene concentrations (−8.9 vs. −14.2 %). Conclusions Plant sterol and stanol intake lowers TC-standardized hydrocarbon carotenoid concentrations, differently affects TC-standardized oxygenated carotenoid concentrations, but does not affect TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations or absolute retinol and vitamin D concentrations. Observed concentrations remained within normal ranges.
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0Alfacalcidol
1ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL
2Analysis
3Anticholesteremic agents
4ANTIOXIDANT CONCENTRATIONS
5Beta carotene
6beverages
7Calcifediol
8Carotenoids - blood
9Chemistry
10Chemistry and Materials Science
11Cholesterol
12Cholesterol - blood
13Databases, Factual
14DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL
15Diet
16Dietetics
17ESTER-ENRICHED MARGARINES
18Fat
19Fat-soluble vitamins
20Fatsoluble vitamins
21food
22Humans
23Hydrocarbon carotenoids
24LDL-CHOLESTEROL
25LIPID PROFILE
26Lycopene
27Medicine (miscellaneous)
28MILDLY HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC SUBJECTS
29Nutrition
30Oxygenated carotenoids
31Phytosterols
32Phytosterols - administration & dosage
33PLACEBO-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
34Plant stanols
35Plant sterols
36PROSTATE-CANCER RISK
37Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
38Retinoids
39Review
40SERUM-CHOLESTEROL CONCENTRATIONS
41soluble vitamins
42Tocopherols
43Tocopherols - blood
44Vitamin A - blood
45Vitamin D
46Vitamin D - blood
47Vitamins - blood
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titlePlasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations after plant sterol and plant stanol consumption: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
authorBaumgartner, Sabine ; Ras, Rouyanne T ; Trautwein, Elke A ; Mensink, Ronald P ; Plat, Jogchum
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2Analysis
3Anticholesteremic agents
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5Beta carotene
6beverages
7Calcifediol
8Carotenoids - blood
9Chemistry
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16Dietetics
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23Hydrocarbon carotenoids
24LDL-CHOLESTEROL
25LIPID PROFILE
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43Tocopherols - blood
44Vitamin A - blood
45Vitamin D
46Vitamin D - blood
47Vitamins - blood
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abstractPurpose Plant sterols and stanols interfere with intestinal cholesterol absorption, and it has been questioned whether absorption and plasma concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids are also affected. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of plant sterol and stanol consumption on plasma fat-soluble vitamin and carotenoid concentrations. Methods Forty-one randomized controlled trials involving 3306 subjects were included. Weighted absolute and relative changes of non-standardized and total cholesterol (TC)-standardized values (expressed as summary estimates and 95 % CIs) were calculated for three fat-soluble vitamins (α- and γ-tocopherol, retinol and vitamin D) and six carotenoids (β-carotene, α-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin) using a random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using predefined subject and treatment characteristics. Results Average plant sterol or stanol intake was 2.5 g/d. Relative non-standardized and TC-standardized concentrations of β-carotene decreased by, respectively, −16.3 % (95 % CI −18.3; −14.3) and −10.1 % (−12.3; −8.0), α-carotene by −14.4 % (−17.5; 11.3) and −7.8 % (−11.3; −4.3), and lycopene by −12.3 % (−14.6; −10.1) and −6.3 % (−8.6; −4.0). Lutein concentrations decreased by −7.4 % (−10.1; −4.8), while TC-standardized concentrations were not changed. For zeaxanthin, these values were −12.9 % (−18.9; −6.8) and −7.7 % (−13.8; −1.7) and for β-cryptoxanthin −10.6 % (−14.3; −6.9) and −4.8 % (−8.7; −0.9). Non-standardized α-tocopherol concentrations decreased by −7.1 % (−8.0; −6.2) and γ-tocopherol by −6.9 % (−9.8; −3.9), while TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations were not changed. Non-standardized retinol and vitamin D concentrations were not affected. Results were not affected by baseline concentrations, dose, duration and type of plant sterols/stanols, except for significant effects of duration (≤4 vs. >4 weeks) on TC-standardized lutein concentrations (1.0 vs. −5.6 %) and type of plant sterol/stanol on TC-standardized β-carotene concentrations (−8.9 vs. −14.2 %). Conclusions Plant sterol and stanol intake lowers TC-standardized hydrocarbon carotenoid concentrations, differently affects TC-standardized oxygenated carotenoid concentrations, but does not affect TC-standardized tocopherol concentrations or absolute retinol and vitamin D concentrations. Observed concentrations remained within normal ranges.
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