schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Disentangling the Impact of Within-Host Evolution and Transmission Dynamics on the Tempo of HIV-1 Evolution

To determine how HIV-1 risk groups impact transmitted diversity and the tempo of viral evolution at a population scale. We investigated a set of previously described transmission chains (n = 70) using a population genetic approach, and tested whether the expected differences in proportions of multiv... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS (London) 2015-07-31, Vol.29 (12), p.1549-1556
Main Author: Vrancken, Bram
Other Authors: Baele, Guy , Vandamme, Anne-Mieke , van Laethem, Kristel , Suchard, Marc A , Lemey, Philippe
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
HIV
Publisher: England: Gower Academic Journals
ID: ISSN: 0269-9370
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26244394
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5348249
title: Disentangling the Impact of Within-Host Evolution and Transmission Dynamics on the Tempo of HIV-1 Evolution
format: Article
creator:
  • Vrancken, Bram
  • Baele, Guy
  • Vandamme, Anne-Mieke
  • van Laethem, Kristel
  • Suchard, Marc A
  • Lemey, Philippe
subjects:
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Amino Acid Substitution
  • Article
  • env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus - genetics
  • Evolution, Molecular
  • evolutionary rate
  • Female
  • Genetic Drift
  • Genetic Variation
  • HIV
  • HIV Infections - transmission
  • HIV Infections - virology
  • HIV-1 - classification
  • HIV-1 - genetics
  • HIV-1 - isolation & purification
  • Human immunodeficiency virus 1
  • Humans
  • Lentivirus
  • Male
  • Mutation Rate
  • Retroviridae
  • risk group
  • Selection, Genetic
  • Sequence Analysis, DNA
  • Sexual Behavior
  • transmission bottleneck
ispartof: AIDS (London), 2015-07-31, Vol.29 (12), p.1549-1556
description: To determine how HIV-1 risk groups impact transmitted diversity and the tempo of viral evolution at a population scale. We investigated a set of previously described transmission chains (n = 70) using a population genetic approach, and tested whether the expected differences in proportions of multivariant transmissions are reflected by varying proportions of transmitted diversity between men having sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual (HET) subpopulations - the largest contributors to HIV spread. To assess evolutionary rate differences among the different risk groups, we compiled risk group datasets for subtypes A1, B and CRF01_AE, and directly compared the absolute substitution rate and its synonymous and non-synonymous components. There was sufficient demographic signal to inform the transmission model in Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees using env data to compare the transmission bottleneck size between the MSM and HET risk groups. We found no indications for a different proportion of transmitted genetic diversity at the population level between these groups. In the direct rate comparisons between the risk groups, however, we consistently recovered a higher evolutionary rate in the male-dominated risk group compared to the HET datasets. We find that the risk group composition affects the viral evolutionary rate and therefore potentially also the adaptation rate. In particular, risk group-specific sex ratios, and the variation in within-host evolutionary rates between men and women, impose evolutionary rate differences at the epidemic level, but we cannot exclude a role of varying transmission rates.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0269-9370
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0269-9370
  • 1473-5571
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.486344
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest_pubme
recordidTN_cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5348249
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid1702659503
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1514t-a7af790029ce236fe01a300e22571822083539749f5b25a8da06ca8ef2d9a6b50
addsrcrecordideNqFks1u1DAUhS0EokPhDRDKkk3K9V9ss0CqOqUzUgVCGmBpOYkzY0jsEHuK-vZ1NKW0XYA3tuxzPt17fRB6jeEEgxLvvpwuT-D-EhQ_QQvMBC05F_gpWgCpVKmogCP0IsYfWcNByufoiFSEMarYAv1cumh9Mn7bO78t0s4W62E0TSpCV3x3aed8uQoxFedXod8nF3xhfFtsJuPj4GKcL5bX3gyuiUU-z4CNHcYw-1frbyX-63yJnnWmj_bV7X6Mvn4835ytysvPF-uz08sSc8xSaYTphAIgqrGEVp0FbCiAJSR3JQkBSTlVgqmO14Qb2RqoGiNtR1plqprDMfpw4I77erBtk_ubTK_HyQ1mutbBOP3wxbud3oYrzSmThKkM-HQAhNF64yb7wNt6m3Rr2_2of3caAGvoZK0wA6CytayqKa4UsKbK9bRCmioD395WNIVfexuTzrNrbN8bb8M-aixBVopiYP-XivyrXHGgWcoO0mYKMU62uysTg54zonNG9OOMZNub--O5M_0JRRa8f8RtXDLzD-Zpuf7f9BtticfR
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1702659503
display
typearticle
titleDisentangling the Impact of Within-Host Evolution and Transmission Dynamics on the Tempo of HIV-1 Evolution
creatorVrancken, Bram ; Baele, Guy ; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke ; van Laethem, Kristel ; Suchard, Marc A ; Lemey, Philippe
creatorcontribVrancken, Bram ; Baele, Guy ; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke ; van Laethem, Kristel ; Suchard, Marc A ; Lemey, Philippe
descriptionTo determine how HIV-1 risk groups impact transmitted diversity and the tempo of viral evolution at a population scale. We investigated a set of previously described transmission chains (n = 70) using a population genetic approach, and tested whether the expected differences in proportions of multivariant transmissions are reflected by varying proportions of transmitted diversity between men having sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual (HET) subpopulations - the largest contributors to HIV spread. To assess evolutionary rate differences among the different risk groups, we compiled risk group datasets for subtypes A1, B and CRF01_AE, and directly compared the absolute substitution rate and its synonymous and non-synonymous components. There was sufficient demographic signal to inform the transmission model in Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees using env data to compare the transmission bottleneck size between the MSM and HET risk groups. We found no indications for a different proportion of transmitted genetic diversity at the population level between these groups. In the direct rate comparisons between the risk groups, however, we consistently recovered a higher evolutionary rate in the male-dominated risk group compared to the HET datasets. We find that the risk group composition affects the viral evolutionary rate and therefore potentially also the adaptation rate. In particular, risk group-specific sex ratios, and the variation in within-host evolutionary rates between men and women, impose evolutionary rate differences at the epidemic level, but we cannot exclude a role of varying transmission rates.
identifier
0ISSN: 0269-9370
1EISSN: 1473-5571
2DOI: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000731
3PMID: 26244394
languageeng
publisherEngland: Gower Academic Journals
subjectAIDS/HIV ; Amino Acid Substitution ; Article ; env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus - genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; evolutionary rate ; Female ; Genetic Drift ; Genetic Variation ; HIV ; HIV Infections - transmission ; HIV Infections - virology ; HIV-1 - classification ; HIV-1 - genetics ; HIV-1 - isolation & purification ; Human immunodeficiency virus 1 ; Humans ; Lentivirus ; Male ; Mutation Rate ; Retroviridae ; risk group ; Selection, Genetic ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sexual Behavior ; transmission bottleneck
ispartofAIDS (London), 2015-07-31, Vol.29 (12), p.1549-1556
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1514t-a7af790029ce236fe01a300e22571822083539749f5b25a8da06ca8ef2d9a6b50
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1514t-a7af790029ce236fe01a300e22571822083539749f5b25a8da06ca8ef2d9a6b50
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26244394$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Vrancken, Bram
1Baele, Guy
2Vandamme, Anne-Mieke
3van Laethem, Kristel
4Suchard, Marc A
5Lemey, Philippe
title
0Disentangling the Impact of Within-Host Evolution and Transmission Dynamics on the Tempo of HIV-1 Evolution
1AIDS (London)
addtitleAIDS
descriptionTo determine how HIV-1 risk groups impact transmitted diversity and the tempo of viral evolution at a population scale. We investigated a set of previously described transmission chains (n = 70) using a population genetic approach, and tested whether the expected differences in proportions of multivariant transmissions are reflected by varying proportions of transmitted diversity between men having sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual (HET) subpopulations - the largest contributors to HIV spread. To assess evolutionary rate differences among the different risk groups, we compiled risk group datasets for subtypes A1, B and CRF01_AE, and directly compared the absolute substitution rate and its synonymous and non-synonymous components. There was sufficient demographic signal to inform the transmission model in Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees using env data to compare the transmission bottleneck size between the MSM and HET risk groups. We found no indications for a different proportion of transmitted genetic diversity at the population level between these groups. In the direct rate comparisons between the risk groups, however, we consistently recovered a higher evolutionary rate in the male-dominated risk group compared to the HET datasets. We find that the risk group composition affects the viral evolutionary rate and therefore potentially also the adaptation rate. In particular, risk group-specific sex ratios, and the variation in within-host evolutionary rates between men and women, impose evolutionary rate differences at the epidemic level, but we cannot exclude a role of varying transmission rates.
subject
0AIDS/HIV
1Amino Acid Substitution
2Article
3env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus - genetics
4Evolution, Molecular
5evolutionary rate
6Female
7Genetic Drift
8Genetic Variation
9HIV
10HIV Infections - transmission
11HIV Infections - virology
12HIV-1 - classification
13HIV-1 - genetics
14HIV-1 - isolation & purification
15Human immunodeficiency virus 1
16Humans
17Lentivirus
18Male
19Mutation Rate
20Retroviridae
21risk group
22Selection, Genetic
23Sequence Analysis, DNA
24Sexual Behavior
25transmission bottleneck
issn
00269-9370
11473-5571
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2015
recordtypearticle
recordideNqFks1u1DAUhS0EokPhDRDKkk3K9V9ss0CqOqUzUgVCGmBpOYkzY0jsEHuK-vZ1NKW0XYA3tuxzPt17fRB6jeEEgxLvvpwuT-D-EhQ_QQvMBC05F_gpWgCpVKmogCP0IsYfWcNByufoiFSEMarYAv1cumh9Mn7bO78t0s4W62E0TSpCV3x3aed8uQoxFedXod8nF3xhfFtsJuPj4GKcL5bX3gyuiUU-z4CNHcYw-1frbyX-63yJnnWmj_bV7X6Mvn4835ytysvPF-uz08sSc8xSaYTphAIgqrGEVp0FbCiAJSR3JQkBSTlVgqmO14Qb2RqoGiNtR1plqprDMfpw4I77erBtk_ubTK_HyQ1mutbBOP3wxbud3oYrzSmThKkM-HQAhNF64yb7wNt6m3Rr2_2of3caAGvoZK0wA6CytayqKa4UsKbK9bRCmioD395WNIVfexuTzrNrbN8bb8M-aixBVopiYP-XivyrXHGgWcoO0mYKMU62uysTg54zonNG9OOMZNub--O5M_0JRRa8f8RtXDLzD-Zpuf7f9BtticfR
startdate20150731
enddate20150731
creator
0Vrancken, Bram
1Baele, Guy
2Vandamme, Anne-Mieke
3van Laethem, Kristel
4Suchard, Marc A
5Lemey, Philippe
generalGower Academic Journals
scope
0CGR
1CUY
2CVF
3ECM
4EIF
5NPM
6AAYXX
7CITATION
87X8
97T2
107T5
117U2
127U9
13C1K
14H94
15BOBZL
16CLFQK
175PM
sort
creationdate20150731
titleDisentangling the Impact of Within-Host Evolution and Transmission Dynamics on the Tempo of HIV-1 Evolution
authorVrancken, Bram ; Baele, Guy ; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke ; van Laethem, Kristel ; Suchard, Marc A ; Lemey, Philippe
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1514t-a7af790029ce236fe01a300e22571822083539749f5b25a8da06ca8ef2d9a6b50
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2015
topic
0AIDS/HIV
1Amino Acid Substitution
2Article
3env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus - genetics
4Evolution, Molecular
5evolutionary rate
6Female
7Genetic Drift
8Genetic Variation
9HIV
10HIV Infections - transmission
11HIV Infections - virology
12HIV-1 - classification
13HIV-1 - genetics
14HIV-1 - isolation & purification
15Human immunodeficiency virus 1
16Humans
17Lentivirus
18Male
19Mutation Rate
20Retroviridae
21risk group
22Selection, Genetic
23Sequence Analysis, DNA
24Sexual Behavior
25transmission bottleneck
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Vrancken, Bram
1Baele, Guy
2Vandamme, Anne-Mieke
3van Laethem, Kristel
4Suchard, Marc A
5Lemey, Philippe
collection
0Medline
1MEDLINE
2MEDLINE (Ovid)
3MEDLINE
4MEDLINE
5PubMed
6CrossRef
7MEDLINE - Academic
8Health and Safety Science Abstracts (Full archive)
9Immunology Abstracts
10Safety Science and Risk
11Virology and AIDS Abstracts
12Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
13AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts
14OpenAIRE (Open Access)
15OpenAIRE
16PubMed Central (Full Participant titles)
jtitleAIDS (London)
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Vrancken, Bram
1Baele, Guy
2Vandamme, Anne-Mieke
3van Laethem, Kristel
4Suchard, Marc A
5Lemey, Philippe
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleDisentangling the Impact of Within-Host Evolution and Transmission Dynamics on the Tempo of HIV-1 Evolution
jtitleAIDS (London)
addtitleAIDS
date2015-07-31
risdate2015
volume29
issue12
spage1549
epage1556
pages1549-1556
issn0269-9370
eissn1473-5571
abstractTo determine how HIV-1 risk groups impact transmitted diversity and the tempo of viral evolution at a population scale. We investigated a set of previously described transmission chains (n = 70) using a population genetic approach, and tested whether the expected differences in proportions of multivariant transmissions are reflected by varying proportions of transmitted diversity between men having sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual (HET) subpopulations - the largest contributors to HIV spread. To assess evolutionary rate differences among the different risk groups, we compiled risk group datasets for subtypes A1, B and CRF01_AE, and directly compared the absolute substitution rate and its synonymous and non-synonymous components. There was sufficient demographic signal to inform the transmission model in Bayesian evolutionary analysis by sampling trees using env data to compare the transmission bottleneck size between the MSM and HET risk groups. We found no indications for a different proportion of transmitted genetic diversity at the population level between these groups. In the direct rate comparisons between the risk groups, however, we consistently recovered a higher evolutionary rate in the male-dominated risk group compared to the HET datasets. We find that the risk group composition affects the viral evolutionary rate and therefore potentially also the adaptation rate. In particular, risk group-specific sex ratios, and the variation in within-host evolutionary rates between men and women, impose evolutionary rate differences at the epidemic level, but we cannot exclude a role of varying transmission rates.
copEngland
pubGower Academic Journals
pmid26244394
doi10.1097/QAD.0000000000000731
oafree_for_read