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Neural Basis of Cognitive Control over Movement Inhibition: Human fMRI and Primate Electrophysiology Evidence

Executive control involves the ability to flexibly inhibit or change an action when it is contextually inappropriate. Using the complimentary techniques of human fMRI and monkey electrophysiology in a context-dependent stop signal task, we found a functional double dissociation between the right ven... Full description

Journal Title: Neuron (Cambridge Mass.), 2017, Vol.96 (6), p.1447-1458.e6
Main Author: Xu, Kitty Z
Other Authors: Anderson, Brian A , Emeric, Erik E , Sali, Anthony W , Stuphorn, Veit , Yantis, Steven , Courtney, Susan M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0896-6273
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29224723
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_5747365
title: Neural Basis of Cognitive Control over Movement Inhibition: Human fMRI and Primate Electrophysiology Evidence
format: Article
creator:
  • Xu, Kitty Z
  • Anderson, Brian A
  • Emeric, Erik E
  • Sali, Anthony W
  • Stuphorn, Veit
  • Yantis, Steven
  • Courtney, Susan M
subjects:
  • Action Potentials - physiology
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Analysis
  • Animals
  • Article
  • Brain Mapping
  • cognitive control
  • Conditioning, Operant
  • context manipulation
  • countermanding
  • executive control
  • Executive Function - physiology
  • eye movement
  • Female
  • fMRI
  • frontal cortex
  • frontal cortex electrophysiology
  • genetic structures
  • Humans
  • Hypotheses
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Inhibition, Psychological
  • Macaca mulatta
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Male
  • Medical colleges
  • Monkeys & apes
  • Movement - physiology
  • Neurons
  • Neurons - physiology
  • Neurophysiology
  • Oxygen - blood
  • Prefrontal Cortex - cytology
  • Prefrontal Cortex - diagnostic imaging
  • Prefrontal Cortex - physiology
  • primate electrophysiology
  • Primates
  • Psychomotor Performance
  • Reaction Time - physiology
  • response inhibition
  • saccades
  • Visual task performance
  • Young Adult
ispartof: Neuron (Cambridge, Mass.), 2017, Vol.96 (6), p.1447-1458.e6
description: Executive control involves the ability to flexibly inhibit or change an action when it is contextually inappropriate. Using the complimentary techniques of human fMRI and monkey electrophysiology in a context-dependent stop signal task, we found a functional double dissociation between the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) and the bi-lateral frontal eye field (FEF). Different regions of rVLPFC were associated with context-based signal meaning versus intention to inhibit a response, while FEF activity corresponded to success or failure of the response inhibition regardless of the stimulus response mapping or the context. These results were validated by electrophysiological recordings in rVLPFC and FEF from one monkey. Inhibition of a planned behavior is therefore likely not governed by a single brain system as had been previously proposed, but instead depends on two distinct neural processes involving different sub-regions of the rVLPFC and their interactions with other motor-related brain regions. •A context-dependent stop-signal task with human fMRI and primate neurophysiology•Task design, data types, and analysis methods enable dissociation of system components•Multiple distinct parts of rVLPFC and interactions with other brain areas required•Context-based attention, interpretation, monitoring, but not direct response control Xu et al. present a rare combination of complementary evidence from human fMRI and primate neurophysiology, demonstrating that response inhibition is not directly accomplished by the rVLPFC, but instead requires multiple, distinct rVLPFC networks involving attention and contextual stimulus interpretation.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0896-6273
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0896-6273
  • 1097-4199
url: Link


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descriptionExecutive control involves the ability to flexibly inhibit or change an action when it is contextually inappropriate. Using the complimentary techniques of human fMRI and monkey electrophysiology in a context-dependent stop signal task, we found a functional double dissociation between the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) and the bi-lateral frontal eye field (FEF). Different regions of rVLPFC were associated with context-based signal meaning versus intention to inhibit a response, while FEF activity corresponded to success or failure of the response inhibition regardless of the stimulus response mapping or the context. These results were validated by electrophysiological recordings in rVLPFC and FEF from one monkey. Inhibition of a planned behavior is therefore likely not governed by a single brain system as had been previously proposed, but instead depends on two distinct neural processes involving different sub-regions of the rVLPFC and their interactions with other motor-related brain regions. •A context-dependent stop-signal task with human fMRI and primate neurophysiology•Task design, data types, and analysis methods enable dissociation of system components•Multiple distinct parts of rVLPFC and interactions with other brain areas required•Context-based attention, interpretation, monitoring, but not direct response control Xu et al. present a rare combination of complementary evidence from human fMRI and primate neurophysiology, demonstrating that response inhibition is not directly accomplished by the rVLPFC, but instead requires multiple, distinct rVLPFC networks involving attention and contextual stimulus interpretation.
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subjectAction Potentials - physiology ; Adolescent ; Adult ; Analysis ; Animals ; Article ; Brain Mapping ; cognitive control ; Conditioning, Operant ; context manipulation ; countermanding ; executive control ; Executive Function - physiology ; eye movement ; Female ; fMRI ; frontal cortex ; frontal cortex electrophysiology ; genetic structures ; Humans ; Hypotheses ; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted ; Inhibition, Psychological ; Macaca mulatta ; Magnetic resonance imaging ; Male ; Medical colleges ; Monkeys & apes ; Movement - physiology ; Neurons ; Neurons - physiology ; Neurophysiology ; Oxygen - blood ; Prefrontal Cortex - cytology ; Prefrontal Cortex - diagnostic imaging ; Prefrontal Cortex - physiology ; primate electrophysiology ; Primates ; Psychomotor Performance ; Reaction Time - physiology ; response inhibition ; saccades ; Visual task performance ; Young Adult
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descriptionExecutive control involves the ability to flexibly inhibit or change an action when it is contextually inappropriate. Using the complimentary techniques of human fMRI and monkey electrophysiology in a context-dependent stop signal task, we found a functional double dissociation between the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) and the bi-lateral frontal eye field (FEF). Different regions of rVLPFC were associated with context-based signal meaning versus intention to inhibit a response, while FEF activity corresponded to success or failure of the response inhibition regardless of the stimulus response mapping or the context. These results were validated by electrophysiological recordings in rVLPFC and FEF from one monkey. Inhibition of a planned behavior is therefore likely not governed by a single brain system as had been previously proposed, but instead depends on two distinct neural processes involving different sub-regions of the rVLPFC and their interactions with other motor-related brain regions. •A context-dependent stop-signal task with human fMRI and primate neurophysiology•Task design, data types, and analysis methods enable dissociation of system components•Multiple distinct parts of rVLPFC and interactions with other brain areas required•Context-based attention, interpretation, monitoring, but not direct response control Xu et al. present a rare combination of complementary evidence from human fMRI and primate neurophysiology, demonstrating that response inhibition is not directly accomplished by the rVLPFC, but instead requires multiple, distinct rVLPFC networks involving attention and contextual stimulus interpretation.
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abstractExecutive control involves the ability to flexibly inhibit or change an action when it is contextually inappropriate. Using the complimentary techniques of human fMRI and monkey electrophysiology in a context-dependent stop signal task, we found a functional double dissociation between the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) and the bi-lateral frontal eye field (FEF). Different regions of rVLPFC were associated with context-based signal meaning versus intention to inhibit a response, while FEF activity corresponded to success or failure of the response inhibition regardless of the stimulus response mapping or the context. These results were validated by electrophysiological recordings in rVLPFC and FEF from one monkey. Inhibition of a planned behavior is therefore likely not governed by a single brain system as had been previously proposed, but instead depends on two distinct neural processes involving different sub-regions of the rVLPFC and their interactions with other motor-related brain regions. •A context-dependent stop-signal task with human fMRI and primate neurophysiology•Task design, data types, and analysis methods enable dissociation of system components•Multiple distinct parts of rVLPFC and interactions with other brain areas required•Context-based attention, interpretation, monitoring, but not direct response control Xu et al. present a rare combination of complementary evidence from human fMRI and primate neurophysiology, demonstrating that response inhibition is not directly accomplished by the rVLPFC, but instead requires multiple, distinct rVLPFC networks involving attention and contextual stimulus interpretation.
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