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Eradication of HIV from Tissue Reservoirs: Challenges for the Cure

The persistence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, even after lengthy and successful combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART), has precluded an effective cure. The anatomical locations in which and biological mechanisms through which the viral population is maintained remain unknown. Mu... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS research and human retroviruses 2017, Vol.34 (ja), p.3-8
Main Author: Rose, Rebecca R
Other Authors: Nolan, David J. , Maidji, Ekaterina , Stoddart, Cheryl , Singer, Elyse J. , Lamers, Susanna , McGrath, Michael
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
HIV
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0889-2229
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28691499
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title: Eradication of HIV from Tissue Reservoirs: Challenges for the Cure
format: Article
creator:
  • Rose, Rebecca R
  • Nolan, David J.
  • Maidji, Ekaterina
  • Stoddart, Cheryl
  • Singer, Elyse J.
  • Lamers, Susanna
  • McGrath, Michael
subjects:
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Antiretroviral agents
  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Biological effects
  • Blood
  • cART
  • Central nervous system
  • Commentaries
  • compartment
  • cure
  • evolution
  • HIV
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Immune system
  • Infections
  • Lymph nodes
  • Lymphocytes
  • Lymphocytes T
  • Macrophages
  • persistence
  • replication
  • Sanctuaries
  • Tissues
  • Viruses
ispartof: AIDS research and human retroviruses, 2017, Vol.34 (ja), p.3-8
description: The persistence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, even after lengthy and successful combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART), has precluded an effective cure. The anatomical locations in which and biological mechanisms through which the viral population is maintained remain unknown. Much research has focused nearly exclusively on circulating resting T-cells as the predominant source of persistent HIV, a strategy with limited success in developing an effective cure strategy. Here, we review research supporting the importance of tissues and other immune cells for HIV maintenance and expansion, including the central nervous system, lymph nodes, and macrophages. We present accumulated research that clearly demonstrates the limitations of using blood-derived cells as a proxy for tissue reservoirs and sanctuaries throughout the body. We cite recent studies that have successfully used deep-sequencing strategies to uncover the complexity of HIV infection and the ability of the virus to evolve despite undetectable plasma viral loads. Finally, we suggest new strategies and highlight the importance of tissue banks for future research.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0889-2229
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0889-2229
  • 1931-8405
url: Link


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descriptionThe persistence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, even after lengthy and successful combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART), has precluded an effective cure. The anatomical locations in which and biological mechanisms through which the viral population is maintained remain unknown. Much research has focused nearly exclusively on circulating resting T-cells as the predominant source of persistent HIV, a strategy with limited success in developing an effective cure strategy. Here, we review research supporting the importance of tissues and other immune cells for HIV maintenance and expansion, including the central nervous system, lymph nodes, and macrophages. We present accumulated research that clearly demonstrates the limitations of using blood-derived cells as a proxy for tissue reservoirs and sanctuaries throughout the body. We cite recent studies that have successfully used deep-sequencing strategies to uncover the complexity of HIV infection and the ability of the virus to evolve despite undetectable plasma viral loads. Finally, we suggest new strategies and highlight the importance of tissue banks for future research.
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subjectAIDS/HIV ; Antiretroviral agents ; Antiretroviral therapy ; Biological effects ; Blood ; cART ; Central nervous system ; Commentaries ; compartment ; cure ; evolution ; HIV ; Human immunodeficiency virus ; Immune system ; Infections ; Lymph nodes ; Lymphocytes ; Lymphocytes T ; Macrophages ; persistence ; replication ; Sanctuaries ; Tissues ; Viruses
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abstractThe persistence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, even after lengthy and successful combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART), has precluded an effective cure. The anatomical locations in which and biological mechanisms through which the viral population is maintained remain unknown. Much research has focused nearly exclusively on circulating resting T-cells as the predominant source of persistent HIV, a strategy with limited success in developing an effective cure strategy. Here, we review research supporting the importance of tissues and other immune cells for HIV maintenance and expansion, including the central nervous system, lymph nodes, and macrophages. We present accumulated research that clearly demonstrates the limitations of using blood-derived cells as a proxy for tissue reservoirs and sanctuaries throughout the body. We cite recent studies that have successfully used deep-sequencing strategies to uncover the complexity of HIV infection and the ability of the virus to evolve despite undetectable plasma viral loads. Finally, we suggest new strategies and highlight the importance of tissue banks for future research.
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doi10.1089/AID.2017.0072
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