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Subjective cognitive concerns are associated with objective memory performance in Caucasian but not African-American persons

subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) have been proposed as a means of identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of SCCs has not been well-explored for African-Americans, who are twice as likely to develop AD dementia as Caucasians. We investigated whether race... Full description

Journal Title: Age and ageing 2017, Vol.46 (6), p.988-993
Main Author: Jackson, Jonathan D
Other Authors: Rentz, Dorene M , Aghjayan, Sarah L , Buckley, Rachel F , Meneide, Tamy-Fee , Sperling, Reisa A , Amariglio, Rebecca E
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: England: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 0002-0729
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29088363
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title: Subjective cognitive concerns are associated with objective memory performance in Caucasian but not African-American persons
format: Article
creator:
  • Jackson, Jonathan D
  • Rentz, Dorene M
  • Aghjayan, Sarah L
  • Buckley, Rachel F
  • Meneide, Tamy-Fee
  • Sperling, Reisa A
  • Amariglio, Rebecca E
subjects:
  • African Americans
  • African Americans - psychology
  • African-American
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Cognition
  • Cognition Disorders - diagnosis
  • Cognition Disorders - ethnology
  • Cognition Disorders - psychology
  • Cognitive Aging - psychology
  • Educational Status
  • Elderly
  • European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
  • Female
  • Health aspects
  • Humans
  • Linear Models
  • Male
  • Memory
  • Memory Disorders - diagnosis
  • Memory Disorders - ethnology
  • Memory Disorders - psychology
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • older adult
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • race
  • Research Paper
  • Risk Factors
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • subjective cognitive concern
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • White people
  • Whites
ispartof: Age and ageing, 2017, Vol.46 (6), p.988-993
description: subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) have been proposed as a means of identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of SCCs has not been well-explored for African-Americans, who are twice as likely to develop AD dementia as Caucasians. We investigated whether race affects the association between SCCs and objective memory performance. we used a composite of three SCC questionnaires, and three challenging episodic memory tests. We studied 289 (61% female; African-American n = 47) clinically normal older individuals. Two hierarchical linear regressions assessed the modifying role of race on the association between SCC and objective memory performance. The first regression was conducted on the full sample, while the second matched the racial groups on age, estimated verbal IQ and socioeconomic status. in the full sample, both groups reported similar levels of SCCs, P = 0.10, although African-Americans performed worse on the memory tasks, P
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-0729
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-0729
  • 1468-2834
url: Link


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titleSubjective cognitive concerns are associated with objective memory performance in Caucasian but not African-American persons
creatorJackson, Jonathan D ; Rentz, Dorene M ; Aghjayan, Sarah L ; Buckley, Rachel F ; Meneide, Tamy-Fee ; Sperling, Reisa A ; Amariglio, Rebecca E
creatorcontribJackson, Jonathan D ; Rentz, Dorene M ; Aghjayan, Sarah L ; Buckley, Rachel F ; Meneide, Tamy-Fee ; Sperling, Reisa A ; Amariglio, Rebecca E
descriptionsubjective cognitive concerns (SCC) have been proposed as a means of identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of SCCs has not been well-explored for African-Americans, who are twice as likely to develop AD dementia as Caucasians. We investigated whether race affects the association between SCCs and objective memory performance. we used a composite of three SCC questionnaires, and three challenging episodic memory tests. We studied 289 (61% female; African-American n = 47) clinically normal older individuals. Two hierarchical linear regressions assessed the modifying role of race on the association between SCC and objective memory performance. The first regression was conducted on the full sample, while the second matched the racial groups on age, estimated verbal IQ and socioeconomic status. in the full sample, both groups reported similar levels of SCCs, P = 0.10, although African-Americans performed worse on the memory tasks, P < 0.001. No group differences were observed in the matched sample. The SCC × race interaction term was nonsignificant in the full sample, β = 0.109, P = 0.09, but was significant in the matched sample, β = 0.422, P = 0.037. While a significant correlation was observed between SCCs and memory among Caucasians, r = -0.401, the correlation was not found among African-Americans, r = -0.052. results suggest that the dissociation between SCCs and memory performance in African-Americans may indicate qualitative differences in how diverse groups endorse cognitive concerns, even after considering socioeconomic and educational factors.
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languageeng
publisherEngland: Oxford University Press
subjectAfrican Americans ; African Americans - psychology ; African-American ; Age Factors ; Aged ; Cognition ; Cognition Disorders - diagnosis ; Cognition Disorders - ethnology ; Cognition Disorders - psychology ; Cognitive Aging - psychology ; Educational Status ; Elderly ; European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology ; Female ; Health aspects ; Humans ; Linear Models ; Male ; Memory ; Memory Disorders - diagnosis ; Memory Disorders - ethnology ; Memory Disorders - psychology ; Neuropsychological Tests ; older adult ; Predictive Value of Tests ; race ; Research Paper ; Risk Factors ; Socioeconomic Factors ; subjective cognitive concern ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; White people ; Whites
ispartofAge and ageing, 2017, Vol.46 (6), p.988-993
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0The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
1COPYRIGHT 2017 Oxford University Press
2The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com 2017
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descriptionsubjective cognitive concerns (SCC) have been proposed as a means of identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of SCCs has not been well-explored for African-Americans, who are twice as likely to develop AD dementia as Caucasians. We investigated whether race affects the association between SCCs and objective memory performance. we used a composite of three SCC questionnaires, and three challenging episodic memory tests. We studied 289 (61% female; African-American n = 47) clinically normal older individuals. Two hierarchical linear regressions assessed the modifying role of race on the association between SCC and objective memory performance. The first regression was conducted on the full sample, while the second matched the racial groups on age, estimated verbal IQ and socioeconomic status. in the full sample, both groups reported similar levels of SCCs, P = 0.10, although African-Americans performed worse on the memory tasks, P < 0.001. No group differences were observed in the matched sample. The SCC × race interaction term was nonsignificant in the full sample, β = 0.109, P = 0.09, but was significant in the matched sample, β = 0.422, P = 0.037. While a significant correlation was observed between SCCs and memory among Caucasians, r = -0.401, the correlation was not found among African-Americans, r = -0.052. results suggest that the dissociation between SCCs and memory performance in African-Americans may indicate qualitative differences in how diverse groups endorse cognitive concerns, even after considering socioeconomic and educational factors.
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titleSubjective cognitive concerns are associated with objective memory performance in Caucasian but not African-American persons
authorJackson, Jonathan D ; Rentz, Dorene M ; Aghjayan, Sarah L ; Buckley, Rachel F ; Meneide, Tamy-Fee ; Sperling, Reisa A ; Amariglio, Rebecca E
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abstractsubjective cognitive concerns (SCC) have been proposed as a means of identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of SCCs has not been well-explored for African-Americans, who are twice as likely to develop AD dementia as Caucasians. We investigated whether race affects the association between SCCs and objective memory performance. we used a composite of three SCC questionnaires, and three challenging episodic memory tests. We studied 289 (61% female; African-American n = 47) clinically normal older individuals. Two hierarchical linear regressions assessed the modifying role of race on the association between SCC and objective memory performance. The first regression was conducted on the full sample, while the second matched the racial groups on age, estimated verbal IQ and socioeconomic status. in the full sample, both groups reported similar levels of SCCs, P = 0.10, although African-Americans performed worse on the memory tasks, P < 0.001. No group differences were observed in the matched sample. The SCC × race interaction term was nonsignificant in the full sample, β = 0.109, P = 0.09, but was significant in the matched sample, β = 0.422, P = 0.037. While a significant correlation was observed between SCCs and memory among Caucasians, r = -0.401, the correlation was not found among African-Americans, r = -0.052. results suggest that the dissociation between SCCs and memory performance in African-Americans may indicate qualitative differences in how diverse groups endorse cognitive concerns, even after considering socioeconomic and educational factors.
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