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Plant-soil interactions in Mediterranean forest and shrublands: impacts of climatic change

Background In the Mediterranean climate, plants have evolved under conditions of low soil-water and nutrient availabilities and have acquired a series of adaptive traits that, in turn exert strong feedback on soil fertility, structure, and protection. As a result, plant-soil systems constitute compl... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2013-04-01, Vol.365 (1/2), p.1-33
Main Author: Sardans, J
Other Authors: Peñuelas, J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
C:N
C:P
N:P
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_6485496
title: Plant-soil interactions in Mediterranean forest and shrublands: impacts of climatic change
format: Article
creator:
  • Sardans, J
  • Peñuelas, J
subjects:
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Article
  • beverages
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • C:N
  • C:P
  • Climate change
  • Climatic changes
  • Desertification
  • Drought
  • Ecology
  • Environmental aspects
  • food
  • Forest soils
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • fungi
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Grassland soils
  • Life Sciences
  • MARSCHNER REVIEW
  • N:P
  • Nitrogen
  • Phosphorus
  • Plant biology
  • Plant growth
  • Plant nutrition
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant populations
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plant-soil relationships
  • Plants
  • Root system
  • Soil biochemistry
  • Soil ecology
  • Soil enzymes
  • Soil erosion
  • Soil erosion, conservation, land management and development
  • Soil microorganisms
  • Soil nutrients
  • Soil research
  • Soil science
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil sciences
  • Soil water
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
  • Terrestrial ecosystems
  • Warming
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2013-04-01, Vol.365 (1/2), p.1-33
description: Background In the Mediterranean climate, plants have evolved under conditions of low soil-water and nutrient availabilities and have acquired a series of adaptive traits that, in turn exert strong feedback on soil fertility, structure, and protection. As a result, plant-soil systems constitute complex interactive webs where these adaptive traits allow plants to maximize the use of scarce resources. Scope It is necessary to review the current bibliography to highlight the most know characteristic mechanisms underlying Mediterranean plant-soil feed-backs and identify the processes that merit further research in order to reach an understanding of the plant-soil feedbacks and its capacity to cope with future global change scenarios. In this review, we characterize the functional and structural plant-soil relationships and feedbacks in Mediterranean regions. We thereafter discuss the effects of global change drivers on these complex interactions between plants and soil. Conclusions The large plant diversity that characterizes Mediterranean ecosystems is associated to the success of coexisting species in avoiding competition for soil resources by differential exploitation in space (soil layers) and time (year and daily). Among plant and soil traits, high foliar nutrient re-translocation and large contents of recalcitrant compounds reduce nutrient cycling. Meanwhile increased allocation of resources to roots and soil enzymes help to protect against soil erosion and to improve soil fertility and capacity to retain water. The long-term evolutionary adaptation to drought of Mediterranean plants allows them to cope with moderate increases of drought without significant losses of production and survival in some species. However, other species have proved to be more sensitive decreasing their growth and increasing their mortality under moderate rising of drought. All these increases contribute to species composition shifts. Moreover, in more xeric sites, the desertification resulting from synergic interactions among some related process such as drought increases, torrential rainfall increases and human driven disturbances is an increasing concern. A research priority now is to discern the effects of long-term increases in atmospheric CO₂ concentrations, warming, and drought on soil fertility and water availability and on the structure of soil communities (e.g., shifts from bacteria to fungi) and on patching vegetation and root-water uplift (from soil to plant and from
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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titlePlant-soil interactions in Mediterranean forest and shrublands: impacts of climatic change
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descriptionBackground In the Mediterranean climate, plants have evolved under conditions of low soil-water and nutrient availabilities and have acquired a series of adaptive traits that, in turn exert strong feedback on soil fertility, structure, and protection. As a result, plant-soil systems constitute complex interactive webs where these adaptive traits allow plants to maximize the use of scarce resources. Scope It is necessary to review the current bibliography to highlight the most know characteristic mechanisms underlying Mediterranean plant-soil feed-backs and identify the processes that merit further research in order to reach an understanding of the plant-soil feedbacks and its capacity to cope with future global change scenarios. In this review, we characterize the functional and structural plant-soil relationships and feedbacks in Mediterranean regions. We thereafter discuss the effects of global change drivers on these complex interactions between plants and soil. Conclusions The large plant diversity that characterizes Mediterranean ecosystems is associated to the success of coexisting species in avoiding competition for soil resources by differential exploitation in space (soil layers) and time (year and daily). Among plant and soil traits, high foliar nutrient re-translocation and large contents of recalcitrant compounds reduce nutrient cycling. Meanwhile increased allocation of resources to roots and soil enzymes help to protect against soil erosion and to improve soil fertility and capacity to retain water. The long-term evolutionary adaptation to drought of Mediterranean plants allows them to cope with moderate increases of drought without significant losses of production and survival in some species. However, other species have proved to be more sensitive decreasing their growth and increasing their mortality under moderate rising of drought. All these increases contribute to species composition shifts. Moreover, in more xeric sites, the desertification resulting from synergic interactions among some related process such as drought increases, torrential rainfall increases and human driven disturbances is an increasing concern. A research priority now is to discern the effects of long-term increases in atmospheric CO₂ concentrations, warming, and drought on soil fertility and water availability and on the structure of soil communities (e.g., shifts from bacteria to fungi) and on patching vegetation and root-water uplift (from soil to plant and from soil deep layers to soil superficial layers) roles in desertification.
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subjectAgronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Article ; beverages ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; C:N ; C:P ; Climate change ; Climatic changes ; Desertification ; Drought ; Ecology ; Environmental aspects ; food ; Forest soils ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; fungi ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Grassland soils ; Life Sciences ; MARSCHNER REVIEW ; N:P ; Nitrogen ; Phosphorus ; Plant biology ; Plant growth ; Plant nutrition ; Plant Physiology ; Plant populations ; Plant Sciences ; Plant-soil relationships ; Plants ; Root system ; Soil biochemistry ; Soil ecology ; Soil enzymes ; Soil erosion ; Soil erosion, conservation, land management and development ; Soil microorganisms ; Soil nutrients ; Soil research ; Soil science ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil sciences ; Soil water ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments ; Terrestrial ecosystems ; Warming
ispartofPlant and soil, 2013-04-01, Vol.365 (1/2), p.1-33
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descriptionBackground In the Mediterranean climate, plants have evolved under conditions of low soil-water and nutrient availabilities and have acquired a series of adaptive traits that, in turn exert strong feedback on soil fertility, structure, and protection. As a result, plant-soil systems constitute complex interactive webs where these adaptive traits allow plants to maximize the use of scarce resources. Scope It is necessary to review the current bibliography to highlight the most know characteristic mechanisms underlying Mediterranean plant-soil feed-backs and identify the processes that merit further research in order to reach an understanding of the plant-soil feedbacks and its capacity to cope with future global change scenarios. In this review, we characterize the functional and structural plant-soil relationships and feedbacks in Mediterranean regions. We thereafter discuss the effects of global change drivers on these complex interactions between plants and soil. Conclusions The large plant diversity that characterizes Mediterranean ecosystems is associated to the success of coexisting species in avoiding competition for soil resources by differential exploitation in space (soil layers) and time (year and daily). Among plant and soil traits, high foliar nutrient re-translocation and large contents of recalcitrant compounds reduce nutrient cycling. Meanwhile increased allocation of resources to roots and soil enzymes help to protect against soil erosion and to improve soil fertility and capacity to retain water. The long-term evolutionary adaptation to drought of Mediterranean plants allows them to cope with moderate increases of drought without significant losses of production and survival in some species. However, other species have proved to be more sensitive decreasing their growth and increasing their mortality under moderate rising of drought. All these increases contribute to species composition shifts. Moreover, in more xeric sites, the desertification resulting from synergic interactions among some related process such as drought increases, torrential rainfall increases and human driven disturbances is an increasing concern. A research priority now is to discern the effects of long-term increases in atmospheric CO₂ concentrations, warming, and drought on soil fertility and water availability and on the structure of soil communities (e.g., shifts from bacteria to fungi) and on patching vegetation and root-water uplift (from soil to plant and from soil deep layers to soil superficial layers) roles in desertification.
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19Grassland soils
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24Phosphorus
25Plant biology
26Plant growth
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29Plant populations
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37Soil erosion
38Soil erosion, conservation, land management and development
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40Soil nutrients
41Soil research
42Soil science
43Soil Science & Conservation
44Soil sciences
45Soil water
46Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
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abstractBackground In the Mediterranean climate, plants have evolved under conditions of low soil-water and nutrient availabilities and have acquired a series of adaptive traits that, in turn exert strong feedback on soil fertility, structure, and protection. As a result, plant-soil systems constitute complex interactive webs where these adaptive traits allow plants to maximize the use of scarce resources. Scope It is necessary to review the current bibliography to highlight the most know characteristic mechanisms underlying Mediterranean plant-soil feed-backs and identify the processes that merit further research in order to reach an understanding of the plant-soil feedbacks and its capacity to cope with future global change scenarios. In this review, we characterize the functional and structural plant-soil relationships and feedbacks in Mediterranean regions. We thereafter discuss the effects of global change drivers on these complex interactions between plants and soil. Conclusions The large plant diversity that characterizes Mediterranean ecosystems is associated to the success of coexisting species in avoiding competition for soil resources by differential exploitation in space (soil layers) and time (year and daily). Among plant and soil traits, high foliar nutrient re-translocation and large contents of recalcitrant compounds reduce nutrient cycling. Meanwhile increased allocation of resources to roots and soil enzymes help to protect against soil erosion and to improve soil fertility and capacity to retain water. The long-term evolutionary adaptation to drought of Mediterranean plants allows them to cope with moderate increases of drought without significant losses of production and survival in some species. However, other species have proved to be more sensitive decreasing their growth and increasing their mortality under moderate rising of drought. All these increases contribute to species composition shifts. Moreover, in more xeric sites, the desertification resulting from synergic interactions among some related process such as drought increases, torrential rainfall increases and human driven disturbances is an increasing concern. A research priority now is to discern the effects of long-term increases in atmospheric CO₂ concentrations, warming, and drought on soil fertility and water availability and on the structure of soil communities (e.g., shifts from bacteria to fungi) and on patching vegetation and root-water uplift (from soil to plant and from soil deep layers to soil superficial layers) roles in desertification.
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