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Social Engagement and Amyloid-β-Related Cognitive Decline in Cognitively Normal Older Adults

•What is the primary question addressed by this study? Do cognitive decline and social disengagement co-occur in cognitively normal older adults and are these changes related to brain amyloid-β, a pathologic marker of Alzheimer's disease?•What is the main finding of this study? In a longitudinal stu... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry 2019-11, Vol.27 (11), p.1247-1256
Main Author: Biddle, Kelsey D
Other Authors: d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico , Jacobs, Heidi I.L , Zide, Benjamin , Kirn, Dylan R , Rentz, Dorene M , Johnson, Keith A , Sperling, Reisa A , Donovan, Nancy J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
TAU
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 1064-7481
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31248770
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_6778491
title: Social Engagement and Amyloid-β-Related Cognitive Decline in Cognitively Normal Older Adults
format: Article
creator:
  • Biddle, Kelsey D
  • d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico
  • Jacobs, Heidi I.L
  • Zide, Benjamin
  • Kirn, Dylan R
  • Rentz, Dorene M
  • Johnson, Keith A
  • Sperling, Reisa A
  • Donovan, Nancy J
subjects:
  • ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE PATHOLOGY
  • ASSOCIATION
  • Beta-amyloid
  • BURDEN
  • Cognition
  • Cognitive ability
  • DEFINITION
  • DEMENTIA
  • INDIVIDUALS
  • LONELINESS
  • NETWORKS
  • Older people
  • preclinical Alzheimer's disease
  • social engagement
  • Social interaction
  • TAU
  • TRAJECTORIES
ispartof: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, 2019-11, Vol.27 (11), p.1247-1256
description: •What is the primary question addressed by this study? Do cognitive decline and social disengagement co-occur in cognitively normal older adults and are these changes related to brain amyloid-β, a pathologic marker of Alzheimer's disease?•What is the main finding of this study? In a longitudinal study of 217 community-dwelling, cognitively normal older adults, lower baseline social engagement was associated with steeper cognitive decline in those with higher amyloid-β levels. Lower-range but normal baseline cognitive performance was associated with decline in social engagement independent of amyloid-β level.•What is the meaning of the finding? Cognitive abilities and social function are related processes in older adults. Level of social engagement contributes to cognitive change in the high-risk group of older adults who are unimpaired but have evidence of Alzheimer's pathologic change. Public health recommendations promote social engagement to reduce risk of cognitive decline and dementia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal associations of social engagement and cognition in cognitively normal older adults with varying levels of neocortical amyloid-β, the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathologic marker. Two hundred seventeen men and women, age 63–89 underwent assessments for social engagement and cognitive performance at baseline and 3 years later using the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire and the Preclinical Alzheimer Cognitive Composite (PACC). Amyloid-β was measured using Pittsburgh compound B-PET. Multivariable regression models estimated main and interactive effects of baseline social engagement and amyloid-β on cognitive change. Reciprocal models estimated main and interactive effects of baseline cognitive performance and amyloid-β on change in social engagement. Baseline social engagement was associated with PACC change as a modifier but not as a main effect. Lower baseline social engagement was associated with greater amyloid-β-related PACC decline, while higher baseline social engagement was associated with relative preservation of PACC scores (β = 0.05, p = 0.03). Reciprocally, lower baseline PACC score was associated with decline in social engagement score (β = 1.1, p = 0.02). This association was not modified by amyloid-β, and there was no direct association of amyloid-β with change in social engagement. Low social engagement may be a marker of neurocognitive vulnerability in older adults
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1064-7481
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1064-7481
  • 1545-7214
url: Link


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creatorBiddle, Kelsey D ; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico ; Jacobs, Heidi I.L ; Zide, Benjamin ; Kirn, Dylan R ; Rentz, Dorene M ; Johnson, Keith A ; Sperling, Reisa A ; Donovan, Nancy J
creatorcontribBiddle, Kelsey D ; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico ; Jacobs, Heidi I.L ; Zide, Benjamin ; Kirn, Dylan R ; Rentz, Dorene M ; Johnson, Keith A ; Sperling, Reisa A ; Donovan, Nancy J
description•What is the primary question addressed by this study? Do cognitive decline and social disengagement co-occur in cognitively normal older adults and are these changes related to brain amyloid-β, a pathologic marker of Alzheimer's disease?•What is the main finding of this study? In a longitudinal study of 217 community-dwelling, cognitively normal older adults, lower baseline social engagement was associated with steeper cognitive decline in those with higher amyloid-β levels. Lower-range but normal baseline cognitive performance was associated with decline in social engagement independent of amyloid-β level.•What is the meaning of the finding? Cognitive abilities and social function are related processes in older adults. Level of social engagement contributes to cognitive change in the high-risk group of older adults who are unimpaired but have evidence of Alzheimer's pathologic change. Public health recommendations promote social engagement to reduce risk of cognitive decline and dementia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal associations of social engagement and cognition in cognitively normal older adults with varying levels of neocortical amyloid-β, the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathologic marker. Two hundred seventeen men and women, age 63–89 underwent assessments for social engagement and cognitive performance at baseline and 3 years later using the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire and the Preclinical Alzheimer Cognitive Composite (PACC). Amyloid-β was measured using Pittsburgh compound B-PET. Multivariable regression models estimated main and interactive effects of baseline social engagement and amyloid-β on cognitive change. Reciprocal models estimated main and interactive effects of baseline cognitive performance and amyloid-β on change in social engagement. Baseline social engagement was associated with PACC change as a modifier but not as a main effect. Lower baseline social engagement was associated with greater amyloid-β-related PACC decline, while higher baseline social engagement was associated with relative preservation of PACC scores (β = 0.05, p = 0.03). Reciprocally, lower baseline PACC score was associated with decline in social engagement score (β = 1.1, p = 0.02). This association was not modified by amyloid-β, and there was no direct association of amyloid-β with change in social engagement. Low social engagement may be a marker of neurocognitive vulnerability in older adults who are cognitively normal but have evidence of AD pathophysiologic change. Understanding changes in social engagement in older adults may lead to earlier diagnosis of AD and advances in evidence-based prevention and treatment.
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subjectALZHEIMERS-DISEASE PATHOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; Beta-amyloid ; BURDEN ; Cognition ; Cognitive ability ; DEFINITION ; DEMENTIA ; INDIVIDUALS ; LONELINESS ; NETWORKS ; Older people ; preclinical Alzheimer's disease ; social engagement ; Social interaction ; TAU ; TRAJECTORIES
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abstract•What is the primary question addressed by this study? Do cognitive decline and social disengagement co-occur in cognitively normal older adults and are these changes related to brain amyloid-β, a pathologic marker of Alzheimer's disease?•What is the main finding of this study? In a longitudinal study of 217 community-dwelling, cognitively normal older adults, lower baseline social engagement was associated with steeper cognitive decline in those with higher amyloid-β levels. Lower-range but normal baseline cognitive performance was associated with decline in social engagement independent of amyloid-β level.•What is the meaning of the finding? Cognitive abilities and social function are related processes in older adults. Level of social engagement contributes to cognitive change in the high-risk group of older adults who are unimpaired but have evidence of Alzheimer's pathologic change. Public health recommendations promote social engagement to reduce risk of cognitive decline and dementia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal associations of social engagement and cognition in cognitively normal older adults with varying levels of neocortical amyloid-β, the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathologic marker. Two hundred seventeen men and women, age 63–89 underwent assessments for social engagement and cognitive performance at baseline and 3 years later using the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire and the Preclinical Alzheimer Cognitive Composite (PACC). Amyloid-β was measured using Pittsburgh compound B-PET. Multivariable regression models estimated main and interactive effects of baseline social engagement and amyloid-β on cognitive change. Reciprocal models estimated main and interactive effects of baseline cognitive performance and amyloid-β on change in social engagement. Baseline social engagement was associated with PACC change as a modifier but not as a main effect. Lower baseline social engagement was associated with greater amyloid-β-related PACC decline, while higher baseline social engagement was associated with relative preservation of PACC scores (β = 0.05, p = 0.03). Reciprocally, lower baseline PACC score was associated with decline in social engagement score (β = 1.1, p = 0.02). This association was not modified by amyloid-β, and there was no direct association of amyloid-β with change in social engagement. Low social engagement may be a marker of neurocognitive vulnerability in older adults who are cognitively normal but have evidence of AD pathophysiologic change. Understanding changes in social engagement in older adults may lead to earlier diagnosis of AD and advances in evidence-based prevention and treatment.
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