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Selection of Fruit by Gibbons (Hylobates muelleri × agilis) in the Rain Forests of Central Borneo

Gibbons (Hylobates spp.) are among the main frugivorous primates in Southeast Asia, yet little is known about the criteria by which they select fruit for consumption. We studied two gibbon groups for 14 mo in the lowland dipterocarp forests of Central Borneo to determine their selectivity for differ... Full description

Journal Title: International journal of primatology 2002-02, Vol.23 (1), p.123-145
Main Author: McConkey, Kim R
Other Authors: Aldy, Firman , Ario, Anton , Chivers, David J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
ID: ISSN: 0164-0291
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=13449010
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recordid: cdi_springer_primary_2002_10764_23_1_360874
title: Selection of Fruit by Gibbons (Hylobates muelleri × agilis) in the Rain Forests of Central Borneo
format: Article
creator:
  • McConkey, Kim R
  • Aldy, Firman
  • Ario, Anton
  • Chivers, David J
subjects:
  • Anthropology/Archaeometry
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Borneo
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • fruit selectivity
  • Human Genetics
  • Hylobates
  • Life Sciences
  • lowland dipterocarp forest
ispartof: International journal of primatology, 2002-02, Vol.23 (1), p.123-145
description: Gibbons (Hylobates spp.) are among the main frugivorous primates in Southeast Asia, yet little is known about the criteria by which they select fruit for consumption. We studied two gibbon groups for 14 mo in the lowland dipterocarp forests of Central Borneo to determine their selectivity for different fruit species and traits. Ideal gibbon fruit were yellow, large, with a juicy-soft pulp, thin skin and available in large crops. Gibbons ultimately sought seedless fruit, but when seeds were present they selected fruit with a single, well-protected seed. Given that few fruit exhibited all the desired traits, we also carried out a multiple regression using the selection ratios of the various fruit species and their associated fruit traits to determine which traits ultimately determined gibbon choice. The analysis was stratified to account for differences in fruit availability. Selection was strongest when fruit were abundant in the forest and was based on seed width (
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0164-0291
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0164-0291
  • 1573-8604
url: Link


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titleSelection of Fruit by Gibbons (Hylobates muelleri × agilis) in the Rain Forests of Central Borneo
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descriptionGibbons (Hylobates spp.) are among the main frugivorous primates in Southeast Asia, yet little is known about the criteria by which they select fruit for consumption. We studied two gibbon groups for 14 mo in the lowland dipterocarp forests of Central Borneo to determine their selectivity for different fruit species and traits. Ideal gibbon fruit were yellow, large, with a juicy-soft pulp, thin skin and available in large crops. Gibbons ultimately sought seedless fruit, but when seeds were present they selected fruit with a single, well-protected seed. Given that few fruit exhibited all the desired traits, we also carried out a multiple regression using the selection ratios of the various fruit species and their associated fruit traits to determine which traits ultimately determined gibbon choice. The analysis was stratified to account for differences in fruit availability. Selection was strongest when fruit were abundant in the forest and was based on seed width (<21 mm), color (yellow-orange), and fruit weight (1–5 g). No selection is apparent when food abundance was intermediate, but when fruit were scarce they preferentially ate larger fruit (6–30 g).
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subjectAnthropology/Archaeometry ; Biological and medical sciences ; Borneo ; Evolutionary Biology ; fruit selectivity ; Human Genetics ; Hylobates ; Life Sciences ; lowland dipterocarp forest
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abstractGibbons (Hylobates spp.) are among the main frugivorous primates in Southeast Asia, yet little is known about the criteria by which they select fruit for consumption. We studied two gibbon groups for 14 mo in the lowland dipterocarp forests of Central Borneo to determine their selectivity for different fruit species and traits. Ideal gibbon fruit were yellow, large, with a juicy-soft pulp, thin skin and available in large crops. Gibbons ultimately sought seedless fruit, but when seeds were present they selected fruit with a single, well-protected seed. Given that few fruit exhibited all the desired traits, we also carried out a multiple regression using the selection ratios of the various fruit species and their associated fruit traits to determine which traits ultimately determined gibbon choice. The analysis was stratified to account for differences in fruit availability. Selection was strongest when fruit were abundant in the forest and was based on seed width (<21 mm), color (yellow-orange), and fruit weight (1–5 g). No selection is apparent when food abundance was intermediate, but when fruit were scarce they preferentially ate larger fruit (6–30 g).
copNew York
pubKluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
doi10.1023/A:1013253909046