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Vivid birds respond more to acoustic signals of predators

Because conspicuous morphology such as colorful plumage may increase predation risk, we aimed to see if variation in plumage coloration could explain variation in avian anti-predator behavior. We included several measures of plumage coloration: human perception of vividness from images in field guid... Full description

Journal Title: Behavioral ecology and sociobiology 2013-08-01, Vol.67 (8), p.1285-1293
Main Author: Journey, Lexi
Other Authors: Drury, Jonathan P , Haymer, Michael , Rose, Kate , Blumstein, Daniel T
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0340-5443
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_springer_primary_2013_265_67_8_1556
title: Vivid birds respond more to acoustic signals of predators
format: Article
creator:
  • Journey, Lexi
  • Drury, Jonathan P
  • Haymer, Michael
  • Rose, Kate
  • Blumstein, Daniel T
subjects:
  • Analysis
  • Animal Ecology
  • Anti-predator behavior
  • Behavioral plasticity
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Behavioural Sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Bird songs
  • Birds
  • Birds of prey
  • Coloration
  • Colors
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Humans
  • Invisibility
  • Life Sciences
  • Locomotion
  • Male animals
  • Museums
  • Original Paper
  • Playback
  • Plumage
  • Plumage vividness
  • Predators
  • Spectral reflectance
  • Spectrophotometry
  • Zoology
ispartof: Behavioral ecology and sociobiology, 2013-08-01, Vol.67 (8), p.1285-1293
description: Because conspicuous morphology such as colorful plumage may increase predation risk, we aimed to see if variation in plumage coloration could explain variation in avian anti-predator behavior. We included several measures of plumage coloration: human perception of vividness from images in field guides, total intensity from reflectance spectra of museum skins, contrasts calculated from physiological models of these spectra parameterized for both raptors and humans, chroma, and spectral saturation. We investigated how well these measurements predicted risk assessment in ten species of birds in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. We quantified how each species responded to playbacks of a predator’s calls and compared this response to that elicited by songs from a non-predatory, sympatric bird. We found that human-determined measures of vividness best predicted anti-predator responses of birds—more vividly colored species responded more to predators than duller species. No spectrophotometric variable explained variation in species reactions to a predator call. Our results suggest that vivid birds may compensate for their conspicuousness by being more responsive to the sound of predators and that more work is needed to better evaluate how animal coloration is quantified in comparative studies.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0340-5443
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0340-5443
  • 1432-0762
url: Link


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descriptionBecause conspicuous morphology such as colorful plumage may increase predation risk, we aimed to see if variation in plumage coloration could explain variation in avian anti-predator behavior. We included several measures of plumage coloration: human perception of vividness from images in field guides, total intensity from reflectance spectra of museum skins, contrasts calculated from physiological models of these spectra parameterized for both raptors and humans, chroma, and spectral saturation. We investigated how well these measurements predicted risk assessment in ten species of birds in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. We quantified how each species responded to playbacks of a predator’s calls and compared this response to that elicited by songs from a non-predatory, sympatric bird. We found that human-determined measures of vividness best predicted anti-predator responses of birds—more vividly colored species responded more to predators than duller species. No spectrophotometric variable explained variation in species reactions to a predator call. Our results suggest that vivid birds may compensate for their conspicuousness by being more responsive to the sound of predators and that more work is needed to better evaluate how animal coloration is quantified in comparative studies.
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subjectAnalysis ; Animal Ecology ; Anti-predator behavior ; Behavioral plasticity ; Behavioral Sciences ; Behavioural Sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Bird songs ; Birds ; Birds of prey ; Coloration ; Colors ; Evolutionary Biology ; Humans ; Invisibility ; Life Sciences ; Locomotion ; Male animals ; Museums ; Original Paper ; Playback ; Plumage ; Plumage vividness ; Predators ; Spectral reflectance ; Spectrophotometry ; Zoology
ispartofBehavioral ecology and sociobiology, 2013-08-01, Vol.67 (8), p.1285-1293
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descriptionBecause conspicuous morphology such as colorful plumage may increase predation risk, we aimed to see if variation in plumage coloration could explain variation in avian anti-predator behavior. We included several measures of plumage coloration: human perception of vividness from images in field guides, total intensity from reflectance spectra of museum skins, contrasts calculated from physiological models of these spectra parameterized for both raptors and humans, chroma, and spectral saturation. We investigated how well these measurements predicted risk assessment in ten species of birds in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. We quantified how each species responded to playbacks of a predator’s calls and compared this response to that elicited by songs from a non-predatory, sympatric bird. We found that human-determined measures of vividness best predicted anti-predator responses of birds—more vividly colored species responded more to predators than duller species. No spectrophotometric variable explained variation in species reactions to a predator call. Our results suggest that vivid birds may compensate for their conspicuousness by being more responsive to the sound of predators and that more work is needed to better evaluate how animal coloration is quantified in comparative studies.
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abstractBecause conspicuous morphology such as colorful plumage may increase predation risk, we aimed to see if variation in plumage coloration could explain variation in avian anti-predator behavior. We included several measures of plumage coloration: human perception of vividness from images in field guides, total intensity from reflectance spectra of museum skins, contrasts calculated from physiological models of these spectra parameterized for both raptors and humans, chroma, and spectral saturation. We investigated how well these measurements predicted risk assessment in ten species of birds in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. We quantified how each species responded to playbacks of a predator’s calls and compared this response to that elicited by songs from a non-predatory, sympatric bird. We found that human-determined measures of vividness best predicted anti-predator responses of birds—more vividly colored species responded more to predators than duller species. No spectrophotometric variable explained variation in species reactions to a predator call. Our results suggest that vivid birds may compensate for their conspicuousness by being more responsive to the sound of predators and that more work is needed to better evaluate how animal coloration is quantified in comparative studies.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
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doi10.1007/s00265-013-1556-z