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Catchment properties predict autochthony in stream filter feeders

Stream ecological theory predicts that the use of allochthonous resources declines with increasing channel width, while at the same time primary production and autochthonous carbon use by consumers increase. Although these expectations have found support in several studies, it is not well known how... Full description

Journal Title: Hydrobiologia 2018, Vol.815 (1), p.83-95
Main Author: Jonsson, Micael
Other Authors: Polvi, Lina E , Sponseller, Ryan A , Stenroth, Karolina
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
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Publisher: Cham: Springer International Publishing
ID: ISSN: 0018-8158
Link: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148625
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recordid: cdi_swepub_primary_oai_DiVA_org_umu_148625
title: Catchment properties predict autochthony in stream filter feeders
format: Article
creator:
  • Jonsson, Micael
  • Polvi, Lina E
  • Sponseller, Ryan A
  • Stenroth, Karolina
subjects:
  • Allochthony
  • Analysis
  • Aquatic insects
  • Autochthony
  • Biological Sciences
  • Biologiska vetenskaper
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • cover
  • Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
  • Ecology
  • Ekologi
  • Forests and forestry
  • Freshwater & Marine Ecology
  • Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
  • hydrologi och vattenresurser
  • Hydrology
  • Land cover
  • Land use
  • Life Sciences
  • Natural Sciences
  • Naturvetenskap
  • Oceanografi
  • Oceanografi, hydrologi och vattenresurser
  • Oceanography
  • Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
  • Primary Research Paper
  • Runoff
  • Stream
  • Usage
  • use
  • Water Resources
  • Zoology
ispartof: Hydrobiologia, 2018, Vol.815 (1), p.83-95
description: Stream ecological theory predicts that the use of allochthonous resources declines with increasing channel width, while at the same time primary production and autochthonous carbon use by consumers increase. Although these expectations have found support in several studies, it is not well known how terrestrial runoff and/or inputs of primary production from lakes alter these longitudinal patterns. To investigate this, we analyzed the diet of filter-feeding black fly and caddisfly larvae from 23 boreal streams, encompassing gradients in drainage area, land cover and land use, and distance to nearest upstream lake outlet. In five of these streams, we also sampled repeatedly during autumn to test if allochthony of filter feeders increases over time as new litter inputs are processed. Across sites, filter-feeder autochthony was 21.1–75.1%, did not differ between black fly and caddisfly larvae, was not positively related to drainage area, and did not decrease with distance from lakes. Instead, lake and wetland cover promoted filter-feeder autochthony independently of stream size, whereas catchment-scale forest cover and forestry reduced autochthony. Further, we found no seasonal increase in allochthony, indicating low assimilation of particles derived from autumn litter fall. Hence, catchment properties, rather than local conditions, can influence levels of autochthony in boreal streams.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0018-8158
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0018-8158
  • 1573-5117
  • 1573-5117
url: Link


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titleCatchment properties predict autochthony in stream filter feeders
creatorJonsson, Micael ; Polvi, Lina E ; Sponseller, Ryan A ; Stenroth, Karolina
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descriptionStream ecological theory predicts that the use of allochthonous resources declines with increasing channel width, while at the same time primary production and autochthonous carbon use by consumers increase. Although these expectations have found support in several studies, it is not well known how terrestrial runoff and/or inputs of primary production from lakes alter these longitudinal patterns. To investigate this, we analyzed the diet of filter-feeding black fly and caddisfly larvae from 23 boreal streams, encompassing gradients in drainage area, land cover and land use, and distance to nearest upstream lake outlet. In five of these streams, we also sampled repeatedly during autumn to test if allochthony of filter feeders increases over time as new litter inputs are processed. Across sites, filter-feeder autochthony was 21.1–75.1%, did not differ between black fly and caddisfly larvae, was not positively related to drainage area, and did not decrease with distance from lakes. Instead, lake and wetland cover promoted filter-feeder autochthony independently of stream size, whereas catchment-scale forest cover and forestry reduced autochthony. Further, we found no seasonal increase in allochthony, indicating low assimilation of particles derived from autumn litter fall. Hence, catchment properties, rather than local conditions, can influence levels of autochthony in boreal streams.
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subjectAllochthony ; Analysis ; Aquatic insects ; Autochthony ; Biological Sciences ; Biologiska vetenskaper ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; cover ; Earth and Related Environmental Sciences ; Ecology ; Ekologi ; Forests and forestry ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology ; Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap ; hydrologi och vattenresurser ; Hydrology ; Land cover ; Land use ; Life Sciences ; Natural Sciences ; Naturvetenskap ; Oceanografi ; Oceanografi, hydrologi och vattenresurser ; Oceanography ; Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources ; Primary Research Paper ; Runoff ; Stream ; Usage ; use ; Water Resources ; Zoology
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descriptionStream ecological theory predicts that the use of allochthonous resources declines with increasing channel width, while at the same time primary production and autochthonous carbon use by consumers increase. Although these expectations have found support in several studies, it is not well known how terrestrial runoff and/or inputs of primary production from lakes alter these longitudinal patterns. To investigate this, we analyzed the diet of filter-feeding black fly and caddisfly larvae from 23 boreal streams, encompassing gradients in drainage area, land cover and land use, and distance to nearest upstream lake outlet. In five of these streams, we also sampled repeatedly during autumn to test if allochthony of filter feeders increases over time as new litter inputs are processed. Across sites, filter-feeder autochthony was 21.1–75.1%, did not differ between black fly and caddisfly larvae, was not positively related to drainage area, and did not decrease with distance from lakes. Instead, lake and wetland cover promoted filter-feeder autochthony independently of stream size, whereas catchment-scale forest cover and forestry reduced autochthony. Further, we found no seasonal increase in allochthony, indicating low assimilation of particles derived from autumn litter fall. Hence, catchment properties, rather than local conditions, can influence levels of autochthony in boreal streams.
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9Ecology
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14hydrologi och vattenresurser
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16Land cover
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abstractStream ecological theory predicts that the use of allochthonous resources declines with increasing channel width, while at the same time primary production and autochthonous carbon use by consumers increase. Although these expectations have found support in several studies, it is not well known how terrestrial runoff and/or inputs of primary production from lakes alter these longitudinal patterns. To investigate this, we analyzed the diet of filter-feeding black fly and caddisfly larvae from 23 boreal streams, encompassing gradients in drainage area, land cover and land use, and distance to nearest upstream lake outlet. In five of these streams, we also sampled repeatedly during autumn to test if allochthony of filter feeders increases over time as new litter inputs are processed. Across sites, filter-feeder autochthony was 21.1–75.1%, did not differ between black fly and caddisfly larvae, was not positively related to drainage area, and did not decrease with distance from lakes. Instead, lake and wetland cover promoted filter-feeder autochthony independently of stream size, whereas catchment-scale forest cover and forestry reduced autochthony. Further, we found no seasonal increase in allochthony, indicating low assimilation of particles derived from autumn litter fall. Hence, catchment properties, rather than local conditions, can influence levels of autochthony in boreal streams.
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