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Perinatal mental distress and infant morbidity in Ethiopia: a cohort study

Objectives (1) To investigate the impact of perinatal common mental disorders (CMD) in Ethiopia on the risk of key illnesses of early infancy: diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and (2) to explore the potential mediating role of maternal health behaviours. Design Population-based... Full description

Journal Title: Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition 2011, Vol.96 (1), p.F59-F64
Main Author: Ross, Joanna
Other Authors: Hanlon, Charlotte , Medhin, Girmay , Alem, Atalay , Tesfaye, Fikru , Worku, Bogale , Dewey, Michael , Patel, Vikram , Prince, Martin
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
dk
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
ID: ISSN: 1359-2998
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recordid: cdi_swepub_primary_oai_DiVA_org_umu_41130
title: Perinatal mental distress and infant morbidity in Ethiopia: a cohort study
format: Article
creator:
  • Ross, Joanna
  • Hanlon, Charlotte
  • Medhin, Girmay
  • Alem, Atalay
  • Tesfaye, Fikru
  • Worku, Bogale
  • Dewey, Michael
  • Patel, Vikram
  • Prince, Martin
subjects:
  • 1506
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • african periurban settlement
  • low-birth-weight
  • maternal depression
  • postnatal-depression
  • postpartum depression
  • developing-countries
  • risk-factors
  • young-children
  • health-care
  • diarrhea
  • asjc
  • atira
  • Birth weight
  • Child Health
  • Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data
  • Clinical Medicine
  • Cohort Studies
  • Confounding Factors, Epidemiologic
  • Demographic aspects
  • Depression, Mental
  • Developing Countries
  • Diarrhea, Infantile - epidemiology
  • Diarrhea, Infantile - etiology
  • Diseases
  • dk
  • Ethiopia - epidemiology
  • Female
  • Fever - epidemiology
  • Fever - etiology
  • Gynaecology
  • Health Behavior
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infants (Newborn)
  • Influence
  • Klinisk medicin
  • Medical and Health Sciences
  • Medicin och hälsovetenskap
  • Mental disorders
  • Mental Disorders - epidemiology
  • Mental Disorders - psychology
  • Middle Aged
  • Mothers - psychology
  • Obstetrics
  • Original
  • Original Articles
  • Pediatrics
  • Pediatrik
  • Perinatology
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
  • Pregnancy Complications - psychology
  • pure
  • Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
  • Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
  • Risk Factors
  • Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
  • Studies
  • subjectarea
  • Womens health
  • Young Adult
ispartof: Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition, 2011, Vol.96 (1), p.F59-F64
description: Objectives (1) To investigate the impact of perinatal common mental disorders (CMD) in Ethiopia on the risk of key illnesses of early infancy: diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and (2) to explore the potential mediating role of maternal health behaviours. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Demographic surveillance site in a predominantly rural area of Ethiopia. Participants 1065 women (86.3% of eligible) in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and 954 (98.6%) of surviving, singleton mother–infant pairs were followed up until 2 months after birth. Main exposure measure High levels of CMD symptoms, as measured by the locally validated Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 ≥6), in pregnancy only, postnatally only and at both time-points (‘persistent’). Main outcome measures Maternal report of infant illness episodes in first 2 months of life. Results The percentages of infants reported to have experienced diarrhoea, ARI and fever were 26.0%, 25.0% and 35.1%, respectively. Persistent perinatal CMD symptoms were associated with 2.15 times (95% CI 1.39 to 3.34) increased risk of infant diarrhoea in a fully adjusted model. The strength of association was not affected by including potential mediators: breast feeding practices, hygiene, the infant's vaccination status or impaired maternal functioning. Persistent perinatal CMD was not associated with infant ARI or fever after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Persistent perinatal CMD was associated with infant diarrhoea in this low-income country setting. The observed relationship was independent of maternal health-promoting practices. Future research should further explore the mechanisms underlying the observed association to inform intervention strategies.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1359-2998
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1359-2998
  • 1468-2052
  • 1468-2052
url: Link


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titlePerinatal mental distress and infant morbidity in Ethiopia: a cohort study
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creatorRoss, Joanna ; Hanlon, Charlotte ; Medhin, Girmay ; Alem, Atalay ; Tesfaye, Fikru ; Worku, Bogale ; Dewey, Michael ; Patel, Vikram ; Prince, Martin
creatorcontribRoss, Joanna ; Hanlon, Charlotte ; Medhin, Girmay ; Alem, Atalay ; Tesfaye, Fikru ; Worku, Bogale ; Dewey, Michael ; Patel, Vikram ; Prince, Martin
descriptionObjectives (1) To investigate the impact of perinatal common mental disorders (CMD) in Ethiopia on the risk of key illnesses of early infancy: diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and (2) to explore the potential mediating role of maternal health behaviours. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Demographic surveillance site in a predominantly rural area of Ethiopia. Participants 1065 women (86.3% of eligible) in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and 954 (98.6%) of surviving, singleton mother–infant pairs were followed up until 2 months after birth. Main exposure measure High levels of CMD symptoms, as measured by the locally validated Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 ≥6), in pregnancy only, postnatally only and at both time-points (‘persistent’). Main outcome measures Maternal report of infant illness episodes in first 2 months of life. Results The percentages of infants reported to have experienced diarrhoea, ARI and fever were 26.0%, 25.0% and 35.1%, respectively. Persistent perinatal CMD symptoms were associated with 2.15 times (95% CI 1.39 to 3.34) increased risk of infant diarrhoea in a fully adjusted model. The strength of association was not affected by including potential mediators: breast feeding practices, hygiene, the infant's vaccination status or impaired maternal functioning. Persistent perinatal CMD was not associated with infant ARI or fever after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Persistent perinatal CMD was associated with infant diarrhoea in this low-income country setting. The observed relationship was independent of maternal health-promoting practices. Future research should further explore the mechanisms underlying the observed association to inform intervention strategies.
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subject1506 ; Abridged Index Medicus ; Adolescent ; Adult ; african periurban settlement; low-birth-weight; maternal depression; postnatal-depression; postpartum depression; developing-countries; risk-factors; young-children; health-care; diarrhea ; asjc ; atira ; Birth weight ; Child Health ; Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data ; Clinical Medicine ; Cohort Studies ; Confounding Factors, Epidemiologic ; Demographic aspects ; Depression, Mental ; Developing Countries ; Diarrhea, Infantile - epidemiology ; Diarrhea, Infantile - etiology ; Diseases ; dk ; Ethiopia - epidemiology ; Female ; Fever - epidemiology ; Fever - etiology ; Gynaecology ; Health Behavior ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; Infants (Newborn) ; Influence ; Klinisk medicin ; Medical and Health Sciences ; Medicin och hälsovetenskap ; Mental disorders ; Mental Disorders - epidemiology ; Mental Disorders - psychology ; Middle Aged ; Mothers - psychology ; Obstetrics ; Original ; Original Articles ; Pediatrics ; Pediatrik ; Perinatology ; Pregnancy ; Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology ; Pregnancy Complications - psychology ; pure ; Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology ; Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology ; Risk Factors ; Rural Health - statistics & numerical data ; Studies ; subjectarea ; Womens health ; Young Adult
ispartofArchives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition, 2011, Vol.96 (1), p.F59-F64
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7Patel, Vikram
8Prince, Martin
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0Perinatal mental distress and infant morbidity in Ethiopia: a cohort study
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descriptionObjectives (1) To investigate the impact of perinatal common mental disorders (CMD) in Ethiopia on the risk of key illnesses of early infancy: diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and (2) to explore the potential mediating role of maternal health behaviours. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Demographic surveillance site in a predominantly rural area of Ethiopia. Participants 1065 women (86.3% of eligible) in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and 954 (98.6%) of surviving, singleton mother–infant pairs were followed up until 2 months after birth. Main exposure measure High levels of CMD symptoms, as measured by the locally validated Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 ≥6), in pregnancy only, postnatally only and at both time-points (‘persistent’). Main outcome measures Maternal report of infant illness episodes in first 2 months of life. Results The percentages of infants reported to have experienced diarrhoea, ARI and fever were 26.0%, 25.0% and 35.1%, respectively. Persistent perinatal CMD symptoms were associated with 2.15 times (95% CI 1.39 to 3.34) increased risk of infant diarrhoea in a fully adjusted model. The strength of association was not affected by including potential mediators: breast feeding practices, hygiene, the infant's vaccination status or impaired maternal functioning. Persistent perinatal CMD was not associated with infant ARI or fever after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Persistent perinatal CMD was associated with infant diarrhoea in this low-income country setting. The observed relationship was independent of maternal health-promoting practices. Future research should further explore the mechanisms underlying the observed association to inform intervention strategies.
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1Abridged Index Medicus
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7Birth weight
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9Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data
10Clinical Medicine
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12Confounding Factors, Epidemiologic
13Demographic aspects
14Depression, Mental
15Developing Countries
16Diarrhea, Infantile - epidemiology
17Diarrhea, Infantile - etiology
18Diseases
19dk
20Ethiopia - epidemiology
21Female
22Fever - epidemiology
23Fever - etiology
24Gynaecology
25Health Behavior
26Humans
27Infant, Newborn
28Infants (Newborn)
29Influence
30Klinisk medicin
31Medical and Health Sciences
32Medicin och hälsovetenskap
33Mental disorders
34Mental Disorders - epidemiology
35Mental Disorders - psychology
36Middle Aged
37Mothers - psychology
38Obstetrics
39Original
40Original Articles
41Pediatrics
42Pediatrik
43Perinatology
44Pregnancy
45Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
46Pregnancy Complications - psychology
47pure
48Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
49Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
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titlePerinatal mental distress and infant morbidity in Ethiopia: a cohort study
authorRoss, Joanna ; Hanlon, Charlotte ; Medhin, Girmay ; Alem, Atalay ; Tesfaye, Fikru ; Worku, Bogale ; Dewey, Michael ; Patel, Vikram ; Prince, Martin
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abstractObjectives (1) To investigate the impact of perinatal common mental disorders (CMD) in Ethiopia on the risk of key illnesses of early infancy: diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and (2) to explore the potential mediating role of maternal health behaviours. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Demographic surveillance site in a predominantly rural area of Ethiopia. Participants 1065 women (86.3% of eligible) in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and 954 (98.6%) of surviving, singleton mother–infant pairs were followed up until 2 months after birth. Main exposure measure High levels of CMD symptoms, as measured by the locally validated Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 ≥6), in pregnancy only, postnatally only and at both time-points (‘persistent’). Main outcome measures Maternal report of infant illness episodes in first 2 months of life. Results The percentages of infants reported to have experienced diarrhoea, ARI and fever were 26.0%, 25.0% and 35.1%, respectively. Persistent perinatal CMD symptoms were associated with 2.15 times (95% CI 1.39 to 3.34) increased risk of infant diarrhoea in a fully adjusted model. The strength of association was not affected by including potential mediators: breast feeding practices, hygiene, the infant's vaccination status or impaired maternal functioning. Persistent perinatal CMD was not associated with infant ARI or fever after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Persistent perinatal CMD was associated with infant diarrhoea in this low-income country setting. The observed relationship was independent of maternal health-promoting practices. Future research should further explore the mechanisms underlying the observed association to inform intervention strategies.
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