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Dykes and structures of the NE rift of Tenerife, Canary Islands: a record of stabilisation and destabilisation of ocean island rift zones

Many oceanic island rift zones are associated with lateral sector collapses, and several models have been proposed to explain this link. The North–East Rift Zone (NERZ) of Tenerife Island, Spain offers an opportunity to explore this relationship, as three successive collapses are located on both sid... Full description

Journal Title: Bulletin of volcanology 2012-03-14, Vol.74 (5), p.963-980
Main Author: Delcamp, A
Other Authors: Troll, V. R , van Wyk de Vries, B , Carracedo, J. C , Petronis, M. S , Pérez-Torrado, F. J , Deegan, F. M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag
ID: ISSN: 0258-8900
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recordid: cdi_swepub_primary_oai_DiVA_org_uu_188384
title: Dykes and structures of the NE rift of Tenerife, Canary Islands: a record of stabilisation and destabilisation of ocean island rift zones
format: Article
creator:
  • Delcamp, A
  • Troll, V. R
  • van Wyk de Vries, B
  • Carracedo, J. C
  • Petronis, M. S
  • Pérez-Torrado, F. J
  • Deegan, F. M
subjects:
  • Analysis
  • Crystalline rocks
  • Dykes
  • Earth and Environmental Science
  • Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
  • Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
  • Earth Sciences
  • Earth, ocean, space
  • Education parks
  • Endogen geovetenskap
  • Endogenous earth sciences
  • Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Evolution
  • Exact sciences and technology
  • Geology
  • Geophysics/Geodesy
  • Geovetenskap
  • Geovetenskap med inriktning mot mineralogi, petrologi och tektonik
  • Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
  • Global Changes
  • Igneous and metamorphic rocks petrology, volcanic processes, magmas
  • Intrusive complex
  • Lateral collapses
  • Lateral flank spreading
  • Mineralogy
  • Museums
  • Natural hazards: prediction, damages, etc
  • Natural Sciences
  • Naturvetenskap
  • Oceanic isl
  • Oceanic island rift zones
  • Research Article
  • rift zones
  • School facilities
  • Sciences of the Universe
  • Sedimentology
  • Tectonics (Geology)
  • Tenerife
  • Volcanoes
  • Volcanology
ispartof: Bulletin of volcanology, 2012-03-14, Vol.74 (5), p.963-980
description: Many oceanic island rift zones are associated with lateral sector collapses, and several models have been proposed to explain this link. The North–East Rift Zone (NERZ) of Tenerife Island, Spain offers an opportunity to explore this relationship, as three successive collapses are located on both sides of the rift. We have carried out a systematic and detailed mapping campaign on the rift zone, including analysis of about 400 dykes. We recorded dyke morphology, thickness, composition, internal textural features and orientation to provide a catalogue of the characteristics of rift zone dykes. Dykes were intruded along the rift, but also radiate from several nodes along the rift and form en échelon sets along the walls of collapse scars. A striking characteristic of the dykes along the collapse scars is that they dip away from rift or embayment axes and are oblique to the collapse walls. This dyke pattern is consistent with the lateral spreading of the sectors long before the collapse events. The slump sides would create the necessary strike-slip movement to promote en échelon dyke patterns. The spreading flank would probably involve a basal decollement. Lateral flank spreading could have been generated by the intense intrusive activity along the rift but sectorial spreading in turn focused intrusive activity and allowed the development of deep intra-volcanic intrusive complexes. With continued magma supply, spreading caused temporary stabilisation of the rift by reducing slopes and relaxing stress. However, as magmatic intrusion persisted, a critical point was reached, beyond which further intrusion led to large-scale flank failure and sector collapse. During the early stages of growth, the rift could have been influenced by regional stress/strain fields and by pre-existing oceanic structures, but its later and mature development probably depended largely on the local volcanic and magmatic stress/strain fields that are effectively controlled by the rift zone growth, the intrusive complex development, the flank creep, the speed of flank deformation and the associated changes in topography. Using different approaches, a similar rift evolution has been proposed in volcanic oceanic islands elsewhere, showing that this model likely reflects a general and widespread process. This study, however, shows that the idea that dykes orient simply parallel to the rift or to the collapse scar walls is too simple; instead, a dynamic interplay between external factors (e.g.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0258-8900
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0258-8900
  • 1432-0819
  • 1432-0819
url: Link


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titleDykes and structures of the NE rift of Tenerife, Canary Islands: a record of stabilisation and destabilisation of ocean island rift zones
creatorDelcamp, A ; Troll, V. R ; van Wyk de Vries, B ; Carracedo, J. C ; Petronis, M. S ; Pérez-Torrado, F. J ; Deegan, F. M
creatorcontribDelcamp, A ; Troll, V. R ; van Wyk de Vries, B ; Carracedo, J. C ; Petronis, M. S ; Pérez-Torrado, F. J ; Deegan, F. M
descriptionMany oceanic island rift zones are associated with lateral sector collapses, and several models have been proposed to explain this link. The North–East Rift Zone (NERZ) of Tenerife Island, Spain offers an opportunity to explore this relationship, as three successive collapses are located on both sides of the rift. We have carried out a systematic and detailed mapping campaign on the rift zone, including analysis of about 400 dykes. We recorded dyke morphology, thickness, composition, internal textural features and orientation to provide a catalogue of the characteristics of rift zone dykes. Dykes were intruded along the rift, but also radiate from several nodes along the rift and form en échelon sets along the walls of collapse scars. A striking characteristic of the dykes along the collapse scars is that they dip away from rift or embayment axes and are oblique to the collapse walls. This dyke pattern is consistent with the lateral spreading of the sectors long before the collapse events. The slump sides would create the necessary strike-slip movement to promote en échelon dyke patterns. The spreading flank would probably involve a basal decollement. Lateral flank spreading could have been generated by the intense intrusive activity along the rift but sectorial spreading in turn focused intrusive activity and allowed the development of deep intra-volcanic intrusive complexes. With continued magma supply, spreading caused temporary stabilisation of the rift by reducing slopes and relaxing stress. However, as magmatic intrusion persisted, a critical point was reached, beyond which further intrusion led to large-scale flank failure and sector collapse. During the early stages of growth, the rift could have been influenced by regional stress/strain fields and by pre-existing oceanic structures, but its later and mature development probably depended largely on the local volcanic and magmatic stress/strain fields that are effectively controlled by the rift zone growth, the intrusive complex development, the flank creep, the speed of flank deformation and the associated changes in topography. Using different approaches, a similar rift evolution has been proposed in volcanic oceanic islands elsewhere, showing that this model likely reflects a general and widespread process. This study, however, shows that the idea that dykes orient simply parallel to the rift or to the collapse scar walls is too simple; instead, a dynamic interplay between external factors (e.g. collapse, erosion) and internal forces (e.g. intrusions) is envisaged. This model thus provides a geological framework to understand the evolution of the NERZ and may help to predict developments in similar oceanic volcanoes elsewhere.
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languageeng
publisherBerlin/Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag
subjectAnalysis ; Crystalline rocks ; Dykes ; Earth and Environmental Science ; Earth and Related Environmental Sciences ; Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics ; Earth Sciences ; Earth, ocean, space ; Education parks ; Endogen geovetenskap ; Endogenous earth sciences ; Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics ; Environmental Sciences ; Evolution ; Exact sciences and technology ; Geology ; Geophysics/Geodesy ; Geovetenskap ; Geovetenskap med inriktning mot mineralogi, petrologi och tektonik ; Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap ; Global Changes ; Igneous and metamorphic rocks petrology, volcanic processes, magmas ; Intrusive complex ; Lateral collapses ; Lateral flank spreading ; Mineralogy ; Museums ; Natural hazards: prediction, damages, etc ; Natural Sciences ; Naturvetenskap ; Oceanic isl ; Oceanic island rift zones ; Research Article ; rift zones ; School facilities ; Sciences of the Universe ; Sedimentology ; Tectonics (Geology) ; Tenerife ; Volcanoes ; Volcanology
ispartofBulletin of volcanology, 2012-03-14, Vol.74 (5), p.963-980
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0Delcamp, A
1Troll, V. R
2van Wyk de Vries, B
3Carracedo, J. C
4Petronis, M. S
5Pérez-Torrado, F. J
6Deegan, F. M
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0Dykes and structures of the NE rift of Tenerife, Canary Islands: a record of stabilisation and destabilisation of ocean island rift zones
1Bulletin of volcanology
addtitleBull Volcanol
descriptionMany oceanic island rift zones are associated with lateral sector collapses, and several models have been proposed to explain this link. The North–East Rift Zone (NERZ) of Tenerife Island, Spain offers an opportunity to explore this relationship, as three successive collapses are located on both sides of the rift. We have carried out a systematic and detailed mapping campaign on the rift zone, including analysis of about 400 dykes. We recorded dyke morphology, thickness, composition, internal textural features and orientation to provide a catalogue of the characteristics of rift zone dykes. Dykes were intruded along the rift, but also radiate from several nodes along the rift and form en échelon sets along the walls of collapse scars. A striking characteristic of the dykes along the collapse scars is that they dip away from rift or embayment axes and are oblique to the collapse walls. This dyke pattern is consistent with the lateral spreading of the sectors long before the collapse events. The slump sides would create the necessary strike-slip movement to promote en échelon dyke patterns. The spreading flank would probably involve a basal decollement. Lateral flank spreading could have been generated by the intense intrusive activity along the rift but sectorial spreading in turn focused intrusive activity and allowed the development of deep intra-volcanic intrusive complexes. With continued magma supply, spreading caused temporary stabilisation of the rift by reducing slopes and relaxing stress. However, as magmatic intrusion persisted, a critical point was reached, beyond which further intrusion led to large-scale flank failure and sector collapse. During the early stages of growth, the rift could have been influenced by regional stress/strain fields and by pre-existing oceanic structures, but its later and mature development probably depended largely on the local volcanic and magmatic stress/strain fields that are effectively controlled by the rift zone growth, the intrusive complex development, the flank creep, the speed of flank deformation and the associated changes in topography. Using different approaches, a similar rift evolution has been proposed in volcanic oceanic islands elsewhere, showing that this model likely reflects a general and widespread process. This study, however, shows that the idea that dykes orient simply parallel to the rift or to the collapse scar walls is too simple; instead, a dynamic interplay between external factors (e.g. collapse, erosion) and internal forces (e.g. intrusions) is envisaged. This model thus provides a geological framework to understand the evolution of the NERZ and may help to predict developments in similar oceanic volcanoes elsewhere.
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2Dykes
3Earth and Environmental Science
4Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
5Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
6Earth Sciences
7Earth, ocean, space
8Education parks
9Endogen geovetenskap
10Endogenous earth sciences
11Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics
12Environmental Sciences
13Evolution
14Exact sciences and technology
15Geology
16Geophysics/Geodesy
17Geovetenskap
18Geovetenskap med inriktning mot mineralogi, petrologi och tektonik
19Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
20Global Changes
21Igneous and metamorphic rocks petrology, volcanic processes, magmas
22Intrusive complex
23Lateral collapses
24Lateral flank spreading
25Mineralogy
26Museums
27Natural hazards: prediction, damages, etc
28Natural Sciences
29Naturvetenskap
30Oceanic isl
31Oceanic island rift zones
32Research Article
33rift zones
34School facilities
35Sciences of the Universe
36Sedimentology
37Tectonics (Geology)
38Tenerife
39Volcanoes
40Volcanology
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titleDykes and structures of the NE rift of Tenerife, Canary Islands: a record of stabilisation and destabilisation of ocean island rift zones
authorDelcamp, A ; Troll, V. R ; van Wyk de Vries, B ; Carracedo, J. C ; Petronis, M. S ; Pérez-Torrado, F. J ; Deegan, F. M
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7Earth, ocean, space
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9Endogen geovetenskap
10Endogenous earth sciences
11Engineering and environment geology. Geothermics
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13Evolution
14Exact sciences and technology
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19Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
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26Museums
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30Oceanic isl
31Oceanic island rift zones
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34School facilities
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39Volcanoes
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abstractMany oceanic island rift zones are associated with lateral sector collapses, and several models have been proposed to explain this link. The North–East Rift Zone (NERZ) of Tenerife Island, Spain offers an opportunity to explore this relationship, as three successive collapses are located on both sides of the rift. We have carried out a systematic and detailed mapping campaign on the rift zone, including analysis of about 400 dykes. We recorded dyke morphology, thickness, composition, internal textural features and orientation to provide a catalogue of the characteristics of rift zone dykes. Dykes were intruded along the rift, but also radiate from several nodes along the rift and form en échelon sets along the walls of collapse scars. A striking characteristic of the dykes along the collapse scars is that they dip away from rift or embayment axes and are oblique to the collapse walls. This dyke pattern is consistent with the lateral spreading of the sectors long before the collapse events. The slump sides would create the necessary strike-slip movement to promote en échelon dyke patterns. The spreading flank would probably involve a basal decollement. Lateral flank spreading could have been generated by the intense intrusive activity along the rift but sectorial spreading in turn focused intrusive activity and allowed the development of deep intra-volcanic intrusive complexes. With continued magma supply, spreading caused temporary stabilisation of the rift by reducing slopes and relaxing stress. However, as magmatic intrusion persisted, a critical point was reached, beyond which further intrusion led to large-scale flank failure and sector collapse. During the early stages of growth, the rift could have been influenced by regional stress/strain fields and by pre-existing oceanic structures, but its later and mature development probably depended largely on the local volcanic and magmatic stress/strain fields that are effectively controlled by the rift zone growth, the intrusive complex development, the flank creep, the speed of flank deformation and the associated changes in topography. Using different approaches, a similar rift evolution has been proposed in volcanic oceanic islands elsewhere, showing that this model likely reflects a general and widespread process. This study, however, shows that the idea that dykes orient simply parallel to the rift or to the collapse scar walls is too simple; instead, a dynamic interplay between external factors (e.g. collapse, erosion) and internal forces (e.g. intrusions) is envisaged. This model thus provides a geological framework to understand the evolution of the NERZ and may help to predict developments in similar oceanic volcanoes elsewhere.
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