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Patterns and drivers of riverine nitrogen (N) across alpine, subarctic, and boreal Sweden

Concentrations of nitrogen (N) in surface waters reflect the export of different organic and inorganic forms from terrestrial environments and the modification of these resources within aquatic habitats. We evaluated the relative influence of terrestrial ecosystem state factors, anthropogenic gradie... Full description

Journal Title: Biogeochemistry 2014-01-01, Vol.120 (1-3), p.105-120
Main Author: Sponseller, Ryan A
Other Authors: Temnerud, Johan , Bishop, Kevin , Laudon, Hjalmar
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cham: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0168-2563
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recordid: cdi_swepub_primary_oai_DiVA_org_uu_231229
title: Patterns and drivers of riverine nitrogen (N) across alpine, subarctic, and boreal Sweden
format: Article
creator:
  • Sponseller, Ryan A
  • Temnerud, Johan
  • Bishop, Kevin
  • Laudon, Hjalmar
subjects:
  • Agriculture
  • Analysis
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Article
  • Automobile drivers
  • Biogeosciences
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological Sciences
  • Biologiska vetenskaper
  • Catchment
  • Earth and Environmental Science
  • Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
  • Earth Science with specialization in Environmental Analysis
  • Earth Sciences
  • Earth, ocean, space
  • Ecology
  • Ecosystems
  • Ekologi
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Exact sciences and technology
  • Forest Science
  • Forest soils
  • Fresh water ecosystems
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • general
  • Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
  • Geovetenskap med inriktning mot miljöanalys
  • Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
  • Hydrology
  • Hydrology. Hydrogeology
  • Industrial productivity
  • Inorganic nitrogen
  • Life Sciences
  • Multidisciplinär geovetenskap
  • Natural Sciences
  • Naturvetenskap
  • Nitrogen
  • Organic farming
  • Organic foods
  • Organic nitrogen
  • Organic soils
  • Rivers
  • Skogsvetenskap
  • Streams
  • Surface water
  • Synecology
  • Terrestrial ecosystems
  • Watershed
  • Watersheds
ispartof: Biogeochemistry, 2014-01-01, Vol.120 (1-3), p.105-120
description: Concentrations of nitrogen (N) in surface waters reflect the export of different organic and inorganic forms from terrestrial environments and the modification of these resources within aquatic habitats. We evaluated the relative influence of terrestrial ecosystem state factors, anthropogenic gradients, and aquatic habitat variables on patterns of N concentration in streams and rivers across Sweden. We analyzed data from 115 national monitoring stations distributed along a 1,300 km latitudinal gradient, draining catchments that differed by more than 10 °C in mean annual temperature (MAT), and more than five orders of magnitude in area. Regional trends in total organic nitrogen (TON) and carbon:nitrogen (C:N) were closely linked to broad-scale gradients in state factors (e.g., MAT), reflecting the importance of long-term ecosystem development on terrestrial organic matter accrual and export. In contrast, trends in nitrate (NO₃⁻), the dominant form of inorganic N, were largely unrelated to state factors, but instead were closely connected to gradients related to anthropogenic inputs (e.g., agricultural cover). Despite large differences in drainage size and cover by lakes and wetlands among sites, these descriptors of the aquatic environment had little influence on spatial patterns of N chemistry. The temporal variability in N concentrations also differed between forms: inorganic N was strongly seasonal, with peaks during dormant periods that underscore biotic control over terrestrial losses of limiting resources. Organic N showed comparatively weaker seasonality, but summertime increases suggest temperature-driven patterns of soil TON production and export—temporal signals which were modified by variables that govern water residence time within catchments. Unique combinations of regional predictors reflect basic differences in the cycling of organic versus inorganic N and highlight variation in the sensitivity of these different N forms to environmental changes that directly alter inputs of resources, or indirectly modify terrestrial ecosystems through shifts in species composition, rates of forest productivity, soil development, and hydrologic routing.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0168-2563
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0168-2563
  • 1573-515X
  • 1573-515X
url: Link


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titlePatterns and drivers of riverine nitrogen (N) across alpine, subarctic, and boreal Sweden
creatorSponseller, Ryan A ; Temnerud, Johan ; Bishop, Kevin ; Laudon, Hjalmar
creatorcontribSponseller, Ryan A ; Temnerud, Johan ; Bishop, Kevin ; Laudon, Hjalmar ; Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet
descriptionConcentrations of nitrogen (N) in surface waters reflect the export of different organic and inorganic forms from terrestrial environments and the modification of these resources within aquatic habitats. We evaluated the relative influence of terrestrial ecosystem state factors, anthropogenic gradients, and aquatic habitat variables on patterns of N concentration in streams and rivers across Sweden. We analyzed data from 115 national monitoring stations distributed along a 1,300 km latitudinal gradient, draining catchments that differed by more than 10 °C in mean annual temperature (MAT), and more than five orders of magnitude in area. Regional trends in total organic nitrogen (TON) and carbon:nitrogen (C:N) were closely linked to broad-scale gradients in state factors (e.g., MAT), reflecting the importance of long-term ecosystem development on terrestrial organic matter accrual and export. In contrast, trends in nitrate (NO₃⁻), the dominant form of inorganic N, were largely unrelated to state factors, but instead were closely connected to gradients related to anthropogenic inputs (e.g., agricultural cover). Despite large differences in drainage size and cover by lakes and wetlands among sites, these descriptors of the aquatic environment had little influence on spatial patterns of N chemistry. The temporal variability in N concentrations also differed between forms: inorganic N was strongly seasonal, with peaks during dormant periods that underscore biotic control over terrestrial losses of limiting resources. Organic N showed comparatively weaker seasonality, but summertime increases suggest temperature-driven patterns of soil TON production and export—temporal signals which were modified by variables that govern water residence time within catchments. Unique combinations of regional predictors reflect basic differences in the cycling of organic versus inorganic N and highlight variation in the sensitivity of these different N forms to environmental changes that directly alter inputs of resources, or indirectly modify terrestrial ecosystems through shifts in species composition, rates of forest productivity, soil development, and hydrologic routing.
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subjectAgriculture ; Analysis ; Animal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Article ; Automobile drivers ; Biogeosciences ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological Sciences ; Biologiska vetenskaper ; Catchment ; Earth and Environmental Science ; Earth and Related Environmental Sciences ; Earth Science with specialization in Environmental Analysis ; Earth Sciences ; Earth, ocean, space ; Ecology ; Ecosystems ; Ekologi ; Environmental Chemistry ; Exact sciences and technology ; Forest Science ; Forest soils ; Fresh water ecosystems ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; general ; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary ; Geovetenskap med inriktning mot miljöanalys ; Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap ; Hydrology ; Hydrology. Hydrogeology ; Industrial productivity ; Inorganic nitrogen ; Life Sciences ; Multidisciplinär geovetenskap ; Natural Sciences ; Naturvetenskap ; Nitrogen ; Organic farming ; Organic foods ; Organic nitrogen ; Organic soils ; Rivers ; Skogsvetenskap ; Streams ; Surface water ; Synecology ; Terrestrial ecosystems ; Watershed ; Watersheds
ispartofBiogeochemistry, 2014-01-01, Vol.120 (1-3), p.105-120
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descriptionConcentrations of nitrogen (N) in surface waters reflect the export of different organic and inorganic forms from terrestrial environments and the modification of these resources within aquatic habitats. We evaluated the relative influence of terrestrial ecosystem state factors, anthropogenic gradients, and aquatic habitat variables on patterns of N concentration in streams and rivers across Sweden. We analyzed data from 115 national monitoring stations distributed along a 1,300 km latitudinal gradient, draining catchments that differed by more than 10 °C in mean annual temperature (MAT), and more than five orders of magnitude in area. Regional trends in total organic nitrogen (TON) and carbon:nitrogen (C:N) were closely linked to broad-scale gradients in state factors (e.g., MAT), reflecting the importance of long-term ecosystem development on terrestrial organic matter accrual and export. In contrast, trends in nitrate (NO₃⁻), the dominant form of inorganic N, were largely unrelated to state factors, but instead were closely connected to gradients related to anthropogenic inputs (e.g., agricultural cover). Despite large differences in drainage size and cover by lakes and wetlands among sites, these descriptors of the aquatic environment had little influence on spatial patterns of N chemistry. The temporal variability in N concentrations also differed between forms: inorganic N was strongly seasonal, with peaks during dormant periods that underscore biotic control over terrestrial losses of limiting resources. Organic N showed comparatively weaker seasonality, but summertime increases suggest temperature-driven patterns of soil TON production and export—temporal signals which were modified by variables that govern water residence time within catchments. Unique combinations of regional predictors reflect basic differences in the cycling of organic versus inorganic N and highlight variation in the sensitivity of these different N forms to environmental changes that directly alter inputs of resources, or indirectly modify terrestrial ecosystems through shifts in species composition, rates of forest productivity, soil development, and hydrologic routing.
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0Agriculture
1Analysis
2Animal and plant ecology
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5Automobile drivers
6Biogeosciences
7Biological and medical sciences
8Biological Sciences
9Biologiska vetenskaper
10Catchment
11Earth and Environmental Science
12Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
13Earth Science with specialization in Environmental Analysis
14Earth Sciences
15Earth, ocean, space
16Ecology
17Ecosystems
18Ekologi
19Environmental Chemistry
20Exact sciences and technology
21Forest Science
22Forest soils
23Fresh water ecosystems
24Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
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26Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
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28Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
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30Hydrology. Hydrogeology
31Industrial productivity
32Inorganic nitrogen
33Life Sciences
34Multidisciplinär geovetenskap
35Natural Sciences
36Naturvetenskap
37Nitrogen
38Organic farming
39Organic foods
40Organic nitrogen
41Organic soils
42Rivers
43Skogsvetenskap
44Streams
45Surface water
46Synecology
47Terrestrial ecosystems
48Watershed
49Watersheds
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authorSponseller, Ryan A ; Temnerud, Johan ; Bishop, Kevin ; Laudon, Hjalmar
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23Fresh water ecosystems
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abstractConcentrations of nitrogen (N) in surface waters reflect the export of different organic and inorganic forms from terrestrial environments and the modification of these resources within aquatic habitats. We evaluated the relative influence of terrestrial ecosystem state factors, anthropogenic gradients, and aquatic habitat variables on patterns of N concentration in streams and rivers across Sweden. We analyzed data from 115 national monitoring stations distributed along a 1,300 km latitudinal gradient, draining catchments that differed by more than 10 °C in mean annual temperature (MAT), and more than five orders of magnitude in area. Regional trends in total organic nitrogen (TON) and carbon:nitrogen (C:N) were closely linked to broad-scale gradients in state factors (e.g., MAT), reflecting the importance of long-term ecosystem development on terrestrial organic matter accrual and export. In contrast, trends in nitrate (NO₃⁻), the dominant form of inorganic N, were largely unrelated to state factors, but instead were closely connected to gradients related to anthropogenic inputs (e.g., agricultural cover). Despite large differences in drainage size and cover by lakes and wetlands among sites, these descriptors of the aquatic environment had little influence on spatial patterns of N chemistry. The temporal variability in N concentrations also differed between forms: inorganic N was strongly seasonal, with peaks during dormant periods that underscore biotic control over terrestrial losses of limiting resources. Organic N showed comparatively weaker seasonality, but summertime increases suggest temperature-driven patterns of soil TON production and export—temporal signals which were modified by variables that govern water residence time within catchments. Unique combinations of regional predictors reflect basic differences in the cycling of organic versus inorganic N and highlight variation in the sensitivity of these different N forms to environmental changes that directly alter inputs of resources, or indirectly modify terrestrial ecosystems through shifts in species composition, rates of forest productivity, soil development, and hydrologic routing.
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doi10.1007/s10533-014-9984-z