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The ecotoxicology and chemistry of manufactured nanoparticles

The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also... Full description

Journal Title: Ecotoxicology (London) 2008, Vol.17 (4), p.287-314
Main Author: Handy, Richard D
Other Authors: von der Kammer, Frank , Lead, Jamie R , Hassellöv, Martin , Owen, Richard , Crane, Mark
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston: Springer US
ID: ISSN: 0963-9292
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_swepub_primary_oai_gup_ub_gu_se_88512
title: The ecotoxicology and chemistry of manufactured nanoparticles
format: Article
creator:
  • Handy, Richard D
  • von der Kammer, Frank
  • Lead, Jamie R
  • Hassellöv, Martin
  • Owen, Richard
  • Crane, Mark
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Article
  • Biological Sciences
  • Biologiska vetenskaper
  • Chemical properties
  • Chemical Sciences
  • Earth and Environmental Science
  • Ecology
  • Ecotoxicology
  • Environment
  • Environmental Management
  • Environmental Pollutants - chemistry
  • Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
  • general
  • Kemi
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanostructures - chemistry
  • Nanostructures - toxicity
  • Nanotechnology
  • Risk Assessment
ispartof: Ecotoxicology (London), 2008, Vol.17 (4), p.287-314
description: The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l −1 concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0963-9292
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0963-9292
  • 1573-3017
url: Link


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descriptionThe emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l −1 concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles.
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subjectAnimals ; Article ; Biological Sciences ; Biologiska vetenskaper ; Chemical properties ; Chemical Sciences ; Earth and Environmental Science ; Ecology ; Ecotoxicology ; Environment ; Environmental Management ; Environmental Pollutants - chemistry ; Environmental Pollutants - toxicity ; general ; Kemi ; Nanoparticles ; Nanostructures - chemistry ; Nanostructures - toxicity ; Nanotechnology ; Risk Assessment
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abstractThe emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l −1 concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles.
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