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Diverse Physical Growth Trajectories in Institutionalized Portuguese Children Below Age 3: Relation to Child, Family, and Institutional Factors

Objective  To identify and analyze diverse longitudinal trajectories of physical growth of institutionalized children and their relation to child, family, and institutional factors.  Methods  49 institutionalized children were studied for 9 months after admission. Weight, height, and head circumfere... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Pediatric Psychology 05/01/2013, Vol.38(4), pp.438-448
Main Author: Martins, C.
Other Authors: Belsky, J. , Marques, S. , Baptista, J. , Silva, J. , Mesquita, A. R. , de Castro, F. , Sousa, N. , Soares, I.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0146-8693 ; E-ISSN: 1465-735X ; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jss129
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recordid: crossref10.1093/jpepsy/jss129
title: Diverse Physical Growth Trajectories in Institutionalized Portuguese Children Below Age 3: Relation to Child, Family, and Institutional Factors
format: Article
creator:
  • Martins, C.
  • Belsky, J.
  • Marques, S.
  • Baptista, J.
  • Silva, J.
  • Mesquita, A. R.
  • de Castro, F.
  • Sousa, N.
  • Soares, I.
subjects:
  • Children
  • Longitudinal Research
  • Parenting
ispartof: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 05/01/2013, Vol.38(4), pp.438-448
description: Objective  To identify and analyze diverse longitudinal trajectories of physical growth of institutionalized children and their relation to child, family, and institutional factors.  Methods  49 institutionalized children were studied for 9 months after admission. Weight, height, and head circumference were measured on 4 occasions, beginning at admission. Data were analyzed using latent class analysis, yielding diverse patterns of growth for each feature, and relations with child characteristics, early family risk factors, and institutional relational care were investigated.  Results  For each growth feature, 4 classes emerged: “Persistently Low,” “Improving,” “Deteriorating,” and “Persistently High.” Younger age at admission was a risk factor for impaired physical growth across all domains. Physical characteristics at birth were associated with trajectories across all domains. Lower prenatal risk and better institutional relational care were associated with Improving weight over time.  Conclusions  Discussion highlights the role of children’s physical features at birth, prenatal risk, and caregiver’s cooperation with the child in explaining differential trajectories.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0146-8693 ; E-ISSN: 1465-735X ; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jss129
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 01468693
  • 0146-8693
  • 1465735X
  • 1465-735X
url: Link


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descriptionObjective  To identify and analyze diverse longitudinal trajectories of physical growth of institutionalized children and their relation to child, family, and institutional factors.  Methods  49 institutionalized children were studied for 9 months after admission. Weight, height, and head circumference were measured on 4 occasions, beginning at admission. Data were analyzed using latent class analysis, yielding diverse patterns of growth for each feature, and relations with child characteristics, early family risk factors, and institutional relational care were investigated.  Results  For each growth feature, 4 classes emerged: “Persistently Low,” “Improving,” “Deteriorating,” and “Persistently High.” Younger age at admission was a risk factor for impaired physical growth across all domains. Physical characteristics at birth were associated with trajectories across all domains. Lower prenatal risk and better institutional relational care were associated with Improving weight over time.  Conclusions  Discussion highlights the role of children’s physical features at birth, prenatal risk, and caregiver’s cooperation with the child in explaining differential trajectories.
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