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Direct Imaging of Atomic-Scale Ripples in Few-Layer Graphene

Graphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened dif... Full description

Journal Title: Wang Wei Li, Sagar Bhandari, Wei Yi, David C. Bell, Robert M. Westervelt, and Efthimios Kaxiras. 2012. Direct imaging of atomic-scale ripples in few-layer graphene. Nano Letters 12(5): 2278–2282.
Main Author: Wang, Wei Li
Other Authors: Bhandari, Sagar , Yi, Wei , Bell, David C. , Westervelt, Robert M. , Kaxiras, Efthimios
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Dft
Iam
ID: ISSN: 1530-6984 ; DOI: 10.1021/nl300071y
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recordid: dash1/10504655
title: Direct Imaging of Atomic-Scale Ripples in Few-Layer Graphene
format: Article
creator:
  • Wang, Wei Li
  • Bhandari, Sagar
  • Yi, Wei
  • Bell, David C.
  • Westervelt, Robert M.
  • Kaxiras, Efthimios
subjects:
  • Graphene Ripples
  • Aberration-Corrected Tem
  • Dft
  • Iam
ispartof: Wang, Wei Li, Sagar Bhandari, Wei Yi, David C. Bell, Robert M. Westervelt, and Efthimios Kaxiras. 2012. Direct imaging of atomic-scale ripples in few-layer graphene. Nano Letters 12(5): 2278–2282.
description: Graphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened diffraction spots in reciprocal space, in which all spatial information is lost. Here we show direct real-space images of the ripples in a few-layer graphene (FLG) membrane resolved at the atomic scale using monochromated aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thickness of FLG amplifies the weak local effects of the ripples, resulting in spatially varying TEM contrast that is unique up to inversion symmetry. We compare the characteristic TEM contrast with simulated images based on accurate first-principles calculations of the scattering potential. Our results characterize the ripples in real space and suggest that such features are likely common in ultrathin materials, even in the nanometer-thickness range.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1530-6984 ; DOI: 10.1021/nl300071y
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1530-6984
  • 1530-6992
  • 15306984
  • 15306992
url: Link


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titleDirect Imaging of Atomic-Scale Ripples in Few-Layer Graphene
creatorWang, Wei Li ; Bhandari, Sagar ; Yi, Wei ; Bell, David C. ; Westervelt, Robert M. ; Kaxiras, Efthimios
ispartofWang, Wei Li, Sagar Bhandari, Wei Yi, David C. Bell, Robert M. Westervelt, and Efthimios Kaxiras. 2012. Direct imaging of atomic-scale ripples in few-layer graphene. Nano Letters 12(5): 2278–2282.
identifierISSN: 1530-6984 ; DOI: 10.1021/nl300071y
subjectGraphene Ripples ; Aberration-Corrected Tem ; Dft ; Iam
descriptionGraphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened diffraction spots in reciprocal space, in which all spatial information is lost. Here we show direct real-space images of the ripples in a few-layer graphene (FLG) membrane resolved at the atomic scale using monochromated aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thickness of FLG amplifies the weak local effects of the ripples, resulting in spatially varying TEM contrast that is unique up to inversion symmetry. We compare the characteristic TEM contrast with simulated images based on accurate first-principles calculations of the scattering potential. Our results characterize the ripples in real space and suggest that such features are likely common in ultrathin materials, even in the nanometer-thickness range.
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titleDirect Imaging of Atomic-Scale Ripples in Few-Layer Graphene
descriptionGraphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened diffraction spots in reciprocal space, in which all spatial information is lost. Here we show direct real-space images of the ripples in a few-layer graphene (FLG) membrane resolved at the atomic scale using monochromated aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thickness of FLG amplifies the weak local effects of the ripples, resulting in spatially varying TEM contrast that is unique up to inversion symmetry. We compare the characteristic TEM contrast with simulated images based on accurate first-principles calculations of the scattering potential. Our results characterize the ripples in real space and suggest that such features are likely common in ultrathin materials, even in the nanometer-thickness range., Engineering and Applied Sciences, Physics
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abstractGraphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened diffraction spots in reciprocal space, in which all spatial information is lost. Here we show direct real-space images of the ripples in a few-layer graphene (FLG) membrane resolved at the atomic scale using monochromated aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thickness of FLG amplifies the weak local effects of the ripples, resulting in spatially varying TEM contrast that is unique up to inversion symmetry. We compare the characteristic TEM contrast with simulated images based on accurate first-principles calculations of the scattering potential. Our results characterize the ripples in real space and suggest that such features are likely common in ultrathin materials, even in the nanometer-thickness range.
pubAmerican Chemical Society
doi10.1021/nl300071y
issue5
volume12
pages2278-2282
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