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Hemoglobin A1c Is Associated With Increased Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease Among Apparently Healthy, Nondiabetic Men and Women

Background: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a time‐integrated marker of glycemic control, predicts risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among diabetics. Few studies have examined HbA1c and risk of CHD among women and men without clinically elevated levels or previously diagnosed diabetes. Methods and Result... Full description

Journal Title: Pai Jennifer K., Leah E. Cahill, Frank B. Hu, Kathryn M. Rexrode, JoAnn E. Manson, and Eric B. Rimm. 2013. Hemoglobin a1c is associated with increased risk of incident coronary heart disease among apparently healthy, nondiabetic men and women. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 2(2): e000077.
Main Author: Pai, Jennifer
Other Authors: Cahill, Leah , Hu, Frank B. , Rexrode, Kathryn Marian , Manson, Joann Elisabeth , Rimm, Eric B.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 2047-9980 ; DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.112.000077
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title: Hemoglobin A1c Is Associated With Increased Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease Among Apparently Healthy, Nondiabetic Men and Women
format: Article
creator:
  • Pai, Jennifer
  • Cahill, Leah
  • Hu, Frank B.
  • Rexrode, Kathryn Marian
  • Manson, Joann Elisabeth
  • Rimm, Eric B.
subjects:
  • Epidemiology
  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • C‐Reactive Protein
  • Epidemiology
  • Glycated Hemoglobin
  • Inflammation
ispartof: Pai, Jennifer K., Leah E. Cahill, Frank B. Hu, Kathryn M. Rexrode, JoAnn E. Manson, and Eric B. Rimm. 2013. Hemoglobin a1c is associated with increased risk of incident coronary heart disease among apparently healthy, nondiabetic men and women. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 2(2): e000077.
description: Background: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a time‐integrated marker of glycemic control, predicts risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among diabetics. Few studies have examined HbA1c and risk of CHD among women and men without clinically elevated levels or previously diagnosed diabetes. Methods and Results: We conducted parallel nested case–control studies among women (Nurses' Health Study) and men (Health Professionals Follow‐up Study). During 14 and 10 years of follow‐up, 468 women and 454 men developed incident nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and fatal CHD. Controls were matched 2:1 based on age, smoking, and date of blood draw. For these analyses, participants with a history of diabetes or HbA1c levels ≥6.5% at baseline were excluded. Compared with HbA1c of 5.0% to
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 2047-9980 ; DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.112.000077
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 2047-9980
  • 20479980
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titleHemoglobin A1c Is Associated With Increased Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease Among Apparently Healthy, Nondiabetic Men and Women
creatorPai, Jennifer ; Cahill, Leah ; Hu, Frank B. ; Rexrode, Kathryn Marian ; Manson, Joann Elisabeth ; Rimm, Eric B.
ispartofPai, Jennifer K., Leah E. Cahill, Frank B. Hu, Kathryn M. Rexrode, JoAnn E. Manson, and Eric B. Rimm. 2013. Hemoglobin a1c is associated with increased risk of incident coronary heart disease among apparently healthy, nondiabetic men and women. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 2(2): e000077.
identifierISSN: 2047-9980 ; DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.112.000077
subjectEpidemiology ; Coronary Heart Disease ; C‐Reactive Protein ; Epidemiology ; Glycated Hemoglobin ; Inflammation
descriptionBackground: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a time‐integrated marker of glycemic control, predicts risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among diabetics. Few studies have examined HbA1c and risk of CHD among women and men without clinically elevated levels or previously diagnosed diabetes. Methods and Results: We conducted parallel nested case–control studies among women (Nurses' Health Study) and men (Health Professionals Follow‐up Study). During 14 and 10 years of follow‐up, 468 women and 454 men developed incident nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and fatal CHD. Controls were matched 2:1 based on age, smoking, and date of blood draw. For these analyses, participants with a history of diabetes or HbA1c levels ≥6.5% at baseline were excluded. Compared with HbA1c of 5.0% to <5.5%, those with an HbA1c of 6.0% to <6.5% had a multivariable‐adjusted relative risk (RR) of CHD of 1.90 (95% CI 1.11 to 3.25) in women and 1.81 (95% CI 1.09 to 3.03) in men. The pooled RR of CHD was 1.29 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.50) for every 0.5%‐increment increase in HbA1c levels and 1.67 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.25) for every 1%‐increment increase, with the risk plateauing around 5.0%. Furthermore, participants with HbA1c levels between 6.0% and <6.5% and C‐reactive protein levels >3.0 mg/L had a 2.5‐fold higher risk of CHD compared with participants in the lowest categories of both biomarkers. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HbA1c is associated with CHD risk among apparently healthy, nondiabetic women and men and may be an important early clinical marker of disease risk.
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titleHemoglobin A1c Is Associated With Increased Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease Among Apparently Healthy, Nondiabetic Men and Women
descriptionBackground: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a time‐integrated marker of glycemic control, predicts risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among diabetics. Few studies have examined HbA1c and risk of CHD among women and men without clinically elevated levels or previously diagnosed diabetes. Methods and Results: We conducted parallel nested case–control studies among women (Nurses' Health Study) and men (Health Professionals Follow‐up Study). During 14 and 10 years of follow‐up, 468 women and 454 men developed incident nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and fatal CHD. Controls were matched 2:1 based on age, smoking, and date of blood draw. For these analyses, participants with a history of diabetes or HbA1c levels ≥6.5% at baseline were excluded. Compared with HbA1c of 5.0% to <5.5%, those with an HbA1c of 6.0% to <6.5% had a multivariable‐adjusted relative risk (RR) of CHD of 1.90 (95% CI 1.11 to 3.25) in women and 1.81 (95% CI 1.09 to 3.03) in men. The pooled RR of CHD was 1.29 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.50) for every 0.5%‐increment increase in HbA1c levels and 1.67 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.25) for every 1%‐increment increase, with the risk plateauing around 5.0%. Furthermore, participants with HbA1c levels between 6.0% and <6.5% and C‐reactive protein levels >3.0 mg/L had a 2.5‐fold higher risk of CHD compared with participants in the lowest categories of both biomarkers. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HbA1c is associated with CHD risk among apparently healthy, nondiabetic women and men and may be an important early clinical marker of disease risk.
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titleHemoglobin A1c Is Associated With Increased Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease Among Apparently Healthy, Nondiabetic Men and Women
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abstractBackground: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a time‐integrated marker of glycemic control, predicts risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among diabetics. Few studies have examined HbA1c and risk of CHD among women and men without clinically elevated levels or previously diagnosed diabetes. Methods and Results: We conducted parallel nested case–control studies among women (Nurses' Health Study) and men (Health Professionals Follow‐up Study). During 14 and 10 years of follow‐up, 468 women and 454 men developed incident nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and fatal CHD. Controls were matched 2:1 based on age, smoking, and date of blood draw. For these analyses, participants with a history of diabetes or HbA1c levels ≥6.5% at baseline were excluded. Compared with HbA1c of 5.0% to <5.5%, those with an HbA1c of 6.0% to <6.5% had a multivariable‐adjusted relative risk (RR) of CHD of 1.90 (95% CI 1.11 to 3.25) in women and 1.81 (95% CI 1.09 to 3.03) in men. The pooled RR of CHD was 1.29 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.50) for every 0.5%‐increment increase in HbA1c levels and 1.67 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.25) for every 1%‐increment increase, with the risk plateauing around 5.0%. Furthermore, participants with HbA1c levels between 6.0% and <6.5% and C‐reactive protein levels >3.0 mg/L had a 2.5‐fold higher risk of CHD compared with participants in the lowest categories of both biomarkers. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HbA1c is associated with CHD risk among apparently healthy, nondiabetic women and men and may be an important early clinical marker of disease risk.
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doi10.1161/JAHA.112.000077
urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3647270/pdf/
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