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Paper-based piezoresistive MEMS sensors

This paper describes the development of piezoresistive MEMS force sensors constructed using paper as the structural material. The sensing principle of the paper-based sensor is based on the piezoresistive effect of conductive materials patterned on a paper substrate. The device is inexpensive (~$0.0... Full description

Journal Title: Liu Xinyu, Martin Mwangi, XiuJun Li, Michael O’Brien, and George M. Whitesides. 2011. “Paper-Based Piezoresistive MEMS Sensors.” Lab on a Chip 11, no. 13: 2189-2196.
Main Author: Liu, Xinyu
Other Authors: Mwangi, Martin , Li, Xiujun , O'Brien, Michael David , Whitesides, George Mcclelland
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1473-0197 ; DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20161A
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1lc20161a
Zum Text:
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recordid: dash1/12967808
title: Paper-based piezoresistive MEMS sensors
format: Article
creator:
  • Liu, Xinyu
  • Mwangi, Martin
  • Li, Xiujun
  • O'Brien, Michael David
  • Whitesides, George Mcclelland
subjects:
  • Force Sensors
  • Microfabrication
  • Microsensors
  • Piezoresistive Devices
  • Conductive Material
  • Materials
  • Micromechanical Devices
  • Resistance
  • Resistors
  • Resistors
  • Structural Beams
ispartof: Liu, Xinyu, Martin Mwangi, XiuJun Li, Michael O’Brien, and George M. Whitesides. 2011. “Paper-Based Piezoresistive MEMS Sensors.” Lab on a Chip 11, no. 13: 2189-2196.
description: This paper describes the development of piezoresistive MEMS force sensors constructed using paper as the structural material. The sensing principle of the paper-based sensor is based on the piezoresistive effect of conductive materials patterned on a paper substrate. The device is inexpensive (~$0.04/device for materials), simple to fabricate, lightweight, and disposable. The entire fabrication process can be completed within one hour in common laboratories with simple tools (e.g., a paper cutter and a painting knife), without requiring cleanroom facilities. The paper substrate allows easy integration of electrical signal processing circuits onto the paper-based MEMS devices. We demonstrated that the paper-based sensor can measure forces with moderate performance (i.e., detection limit: 120 μN, measurement range: ±16 mN, and sensitivity: 0.84 mV/mN), and applied the sensor to characterizing mechanical properties of soft materials. We also developed a paper-based weighting balance with a measurement range of 15 g and a resolution of 25 mg.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1473-0197 ; DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20161A
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1473-0197
  • 14730197
url: Link


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titlePaper-based piezoresistive MEMS sensors
creatorLiu, Xinyu ; Mwangi, Martin ; Li, Xiujun ; O'Brien, Michael David ; Whitesides, George Mcclelland
ispartofLiu, Xinyu, Martin Mwangi, XiuJun Li, Michael O’Brien, and George M. Whitesides. 2011. “Paper-Based Piezoresistive MEMS Sensors.” Lab on a Chip 11, no. 13: 2189-2196.
identifierISSN: 1473-0197 ; DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20161A
subjectForce Sensors ; Microfabrication ; Microsensors ; Piezoresistive Devices ; Conductive Material ; Materials ; Micromechanical Devices ; Resistance ; Resistors ; Resistors ; Structural Beams
descriptionThis paper describes the development of piezoresistive MEMS force sensors constructed using paper as the structural material. The sensing principle of the paper-based sensor is based on the piezoresistive effect of conductive materials patterned on a paper substrate. The device is inexpensive (~$0.04/device for materials), simple to fabricate, lightweight, and disposable. The entire fabrication process can be completed within one hour in common laboratories with simple tools (e.g., a paper cutter and a painting knife), without requiring cleanroom facilities. The paper substrate allows easy integration of electrical signal processing circuits onto the paper-based MEMS devices. We demonstrated that the paper-based sensor can measure forces with moderate performance (i.e., detection limit: 120 μN, measurement range: ±16 mN, and sensitivity: 0.84 mV/mN), and applied the sensor to characterizing mechanical properties of soft materials. We also developed a paper-based weighting balance with a measurement range of 15 g and a resolution of 25 mg.
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titlePaper-based piezoresistive MEMS sensors
descriptionThis paper describes the development of piezoresistive MEMS force sensors constructed using paper as the structural material. The sensing principle of the paper-based sensor is based on the piezoresistive effect of conductive materials patterned on a paper substrate. The device is inexpensive (~$0.04/device for materials), simple to fabricate, lightweight, and disposable. The entire fabrication process can be completed within one hour in common laboratories with simple tools (e.g., a paper cutter and a painting knife), without requiring cleanroom facilities. The paper substrate allows easy integration of electrical signal processing circuits onto the paper-based MEMS devices. We demonstrated that the paper-based sensor can measure forces with moderate performance (i.e., detection limit: 120 μN, measurement range: ±16 mN, and sensitivity: 0.84 mV/mN), and applied the sensor to characterizing mechanical properties of soft materials. We also developed a paper-based weighting balance with a measurement range of 15 g and a resolution of 25 mg., Chemistry and Chemical Biology
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abstractThis paper describes the development of piezoresistive MEMS force sensors constructed using paper as the structural material. The sensing principle of the paper-based sensor is based on the piezoresistive effect of conductive materials patterned on a paper substrate. The device is inexpensive (~$0.04/device for materials), simple to fabricate, lightweight, and disposable. The entire fabrication process can be completed within one hour in common laboratories with simple tools (e.g., a paper cutter and a painting knife), without requiring cleanroom facilities. The paper substrate allows easy integration of electrical signal processing circuits onto the paper-based MEMS devices. We demonstrated that the paper-based sensor can measure forces with moderate performance (i.e., detection limit: 120 μN, measurement range: ±16 mN, and sensitivity: 0.84 mV/mN), and applied the sensor to characterizing mechanical properties of soft materials. We also developed a paper-based weighting balance with a measurement range of 15 g and a resolution of 25 mg.
pubRoyal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
doi10.1039/c1lc20161a
pages2189-2196
volume11
issue13
eissn14730189
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