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Bachelors, Divorcees, and Widowers: Does Marriage Protect Men from Type 2 Diabetes?

While research has suggested that being married may confer a health advantage, few studies to date have investigated the role of marital status in the development of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether men who are not married have increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in the Health Professiona... Full description

Journal Title: Cornelis Marilyn C., Stephanie E. Chiuve, M. Maria Glymour, Shun-Chiao Chang, Eric J. Tchetgen Tchetgen, Liming Liang, Karestan C. Koenen, Eric B. Rimm, Ichiro Kawachi, and Laura D. Kubzansky. 2014. “Bachelors, Divorcees, and Widowers: Does Marriage Protect Men from Type 2 Diabetes?” PLoS ONE 9 (9): e106720. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106720. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0106720.
Main Author: Cornelis, Marilyn C.
Other Authors: Chiuve, Stephanie E. , Glymour, M. Maria , Chang, Shun-Chiao , Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J. , Liang, Liming , Koenen, Karestan C. , Rimm, Eric B. , Kawachi, Ichiro , Kubzansky, Laura D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0106720
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recordid: dash1/12987251
title: Bachelors, Divorcees, and Widowers: Does Marriage Protect Men from Type 2 Diabetes?
format: Article
creator:
  • Cornelis, Marilyn C.
  • Chiuve, Stephanie E.
  • Glymour, M. Maria
  • Chang, Shun-Chiao
  • Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.
  • Liang, Liming
  • Koenen, Karestan C.
  • Rimm, Eric B.
  • Kawachi, Ichiro
  • Kubzansky, Laura D.
subjects:
  • Biology And Life Sciences
  • Physiology
  • Physiological Parameters
  • Body Weight
  • Obesity
  • Psychology
  • Human Relations
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Medicine And Health Sciences
  • Epidemiology
  • Social Epidemiology
  • Metabolic Disorders
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Type 2 Diabetes Risk
  • Social Sciences
ispartof: Cornelis, Marilyn C., Stephanie E. Chiuve, M. Maria Glymour, Shun-Chiao Chang, Eric J. Tchetgen Tchetgen, Liming Liang, Karestan C. Koenen, Eric B. Rimm, Ichiro Kawachi, and Laura D. Kubzansky. 2014. “Bachelors, Divorcees, and Widowers: Does Marriage Protect Men from Type 2 Diabetes?” PLoS ONE 9 (9): e106720. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106720. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0106720.
description: While research has suggested that being married may confer a health advantage, few studies to date have investigated the role of marital status in the development of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether men who are not married have increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men (n = 41,378) who were free of T2D in 1986, were followed for ≤22 years with biennial reports of T2D, marital status and covariates. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare risk of incident T2D by marital status (married vs unmarried and married vs never married, divorced/separated, or widowed). There were 2,952 cases of incident T2D. Compared to married men, unmarried men had a 16% higher risk of developing T2D (95%CI:1.04,1.30), adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, ethnicity, lifestyle and body mass index (BMI). Relative risks (RR) for developing T2D differed for divorced/separated (1.09 [95%CI: 0.94,1.27]), widowed (1.29 [95%CI:1.06,1.57]), and never married (1.17 [95%CI:0.91,1.52]) after adjusting for age, family history of diabetes and ethnicity. Adjusting for lifestyle and BMI, the RR for T2D associated with widowhood was no longer significant (RR:1.16 [95%CI:0.95,1.41]). When allowing for a 2-year lag period between marital status and disease, RRs of T2D for widowers were augmented and borderline significant (RR:1.24 [95%CI:1.00,1.54]) after full adjustment. In conclusion, not being married, and more specifically, widowhood was more consistently associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men and this may be mediated, in part, through unfavorable changes in lifestyle, diet and adiposity.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0106720
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1932-6203
  • 19326203
url: Link


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titleBachelors, Divorcees, and Widowers: Does Marriage Protect Men from Type 2 Diabetes?
creatorCornelis, Marilyn C. ; Chiuve, Stephanie E. ; Glymour, M. Maria ; Chang, Shun-Chiao ; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J. ; Liang, Liming ; Koenen, Karestan C. ; Rimm, Eric B. ; Kawachi, Ichiro ; Kubzansky, Laura D.
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identifierISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0106720
subjectBiology And Life Sciences ; Physiology ; Physiological Parameters ; Body Weight ; Obesity ; Psychology ; Human Relations ; Interpersonal Relationships ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Epidemiology ; Social Epidemiology ; Metabolic Disorders ; Diabetes Mellitus ; Type 2 Diabetes ; Type 2 Diabetes Risk ; Social Sciences
descriptionWhile research has suggested that being married may confer a health advantage, few studies to date have investigated the role of marital status in the development of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether men who are not married have increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men (n = 41,378) who were free of T2D in 1986, were followed for ≤22 years with biennial reports of T2D, marital status and covariates. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare risk of incident T2D by marital status (married vs unmarried and married vs never married, divorced/separated, or widowed). There were 2,952 cases of incident T2D. Compared to married men, unmarried men had a 16% higher risk of developing T2D (95%CI:1.04,1.30), adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, ethnicity, lifestyle and body mass index (BMI). Relative risks (RR) for developing T2D differed for divorced/separated (1.09 [95%CI: 0.94,1.27]), widowed (1.29 [95%CI:1.06,1.57]), and never married (1.17 [95%CI:0.91,1.52]) after adjusting for age, family history of diabetes and ethnicity. Adjusting for lifestyle and BMI, the RR for T2D associated with widowhood was no longer significant (RR:1.16 [95%CI:0.95,1.41]). When allowing for a 2-year lag period between marital status and disease, RRs of T2D for widowers were augmented and borderline significant (RR:1.24 [95%CI:1.00,1.54]) after full adjustment. In conclusion, not being married, and more specifically, widowhood was more consistently associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men and this may be mediated, in part, through unfavorable changes in lifestyle, diet and adiposity.
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titleBachelors, Divorcees, and Widowers: Does Marriage Protect Men from Type 2 Diabetes?
descriptionWhile research has suggested that being married may confer a health advantage, few studies to date have investigated the role of marital status in the development of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether men who are not married have increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men (n = 41,378) who were free of T2D in 1986, were followed for ≤22 years with biennial reports of T2D, marital status and covariates. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare risk of incident T2D by marital status (married vs unmarried and married vs never married, divorced/separated, or widowed). There were 2,952 cases of incident T2D. Compared to married men, unmarried men had a 16% higher risk of developing T2D (95%CI:1.04,1.30), adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, ethnicity, lifestyle and body mass index (BMI). Relative risks (RR) for developing T2D differed for divorced/separated (1.09 [95%CI: 0.94,1.27]), widowed (1.29 [95%CI:1.06,1.57]), and never married (1.17 [95%CI:0.91,1.52]) after adjusting for age, family history of diabetes and ethnicity. Adjusting for lifestyle and BMI, the RR for T2D associated with widowhood was no longer significant (RR:1.16 [95%CI:0.95,1.41]). When allowing for a 2-year lag period between marital status and disease, RRs of T2D for widowers were augmented and borderline significant (RR:1.24 [95%CI:1.00,1.54]) after full adjustment. In conclusion, not being married, and more specifically, widowhood was more consistently associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men and this may be mediated, in part, through unfavorable changes in lifestyle, diet and adiposity.
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authorCornelis, Marilyn C. ; Chiuve, Stephanie E. ; Glymour, M. Maria ; Chang, Shun-Chiao ; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J. ; Liang, Liming ; Koenen, Karestan C. ; Rimm, Eric B. ; Kawachi, Ichiro ; Kubzansky, Laura D.
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abstractWhile research has suggested that being married may confer a health advantage, few studies to date have investigated the role of marital status in the development of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether men who are not married have increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men (n = 41,378) who were free of T2D in 1986, were followed for ≤22 years with biennial reports of T2D, marital status and covariates. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare risk of incident T2D by marital status (married vs unmarried and married vs never married, divorced/separated, or widowed). There were 2,952 cases of incident T2D. Compared to married men, unmarried men had a 16% higher risk of developing T2D (95%CI:1.04,1.30), adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, ethnicity, lifestyle and body mass index (BMI). Relative risks (RR) for developing T2D differed for divorced/separated (1.09 [95%CI: 0.94,1.27]), widowed (1.29 [95%CI:1.06,1.57]), and never married (1.17 [95%CI:0.91,1.52]) after adjusting for age, family history of diabetes and ethnicity. Adjusting for lifestyle and BMI, the RR for T2D associated with widowhood was no longer significant (RR:1.16 [95%CI:0.95,1.41]). When allowing for a 2-year lag period between marital status and disease, RRs of T2D for widowers were augmented and borderline significant (RR:1.24 [95%CI:1.00,1.54]) after full adjustment. In conclusion, not being married, and more specifically, widowhood was more consistently associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men and this may be mediated, in part, through unfavorable changes in lifestyle, diet and adiposity.
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doi10.1371/journal.pone.0106720
urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4167705/pdf/
volume9
issue9
pages259-267
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