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Changes in Alcohol Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association of 4-year changes in alcohol consumption with a subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 38,031 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of diagnosed dia... Full description

Journal Title: Joosten Michel M., Stephanie Elizabeth Chiuve, Kenneth J. Mukamal, Frank B. Hu, Henk F. J. Hendriks, and Eric B. Rimm. 2011. Changes in alcohol consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes in men. Diabetes 60(1): 74-79.
Main Author: Chiuve, Stephanie Elizabeth
Other Authors: Hu, Frank B. , Rimm, Eric B. , Joosten, Michel M. , Mukamal, Kenneth J. , Hendriks, Henk F. J.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0012-1797 ; DOI: 10.2337/db10-1052
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recordid: dash1/8579755
title: Changes in Alcohol Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men
format: Article
creator:
  • Chiuve, Stephanie Elizabeth
  • Hu, Frank B.
  • Rimm, Eric B.
  • Joosten, Michel M.
  • Mukamal, Kenneth J.
  • Hendriks, Henk F. J.
subjects:
  • Drinking of Alcoholic Beverages
  • Management
  • Health Aspects
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Demographic Aspects
  • Risk Factors
  • Medicine
ispartof: Joosten, Michel M., Stephanie Elizabeth Chiuve, Kenneth J. Mukamal, Frank B. Hu, Henk F. J. Hendriks, and Eric B. Rimm. 2011. Changes in alcohol consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes in men. Diabetes 60(1): 74-79.
description: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association of 4-year changes in alcohol consumption with a subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 38,031 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of diagnosed diabetes or cancer in 1990. Alcohol consumption was reported on food frequency questionnaires and updated every 4 years. RESULTS: A total of 1,905 cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 428,497 person-years of follow-up. A 7.5 g/day (approximately half a glass) increase in alcohol consumption over 4 years was associated with lower diabetes risk among initial nondrinkers (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 0.78; 95% CI: 0.60–1.00) and drinkers initially consuming
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-1797 ; DOI: 10.2337/db10-1052
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0012-1797
  • 1939-327X
  • 00121797
  • 1939327X
url: Link


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titleChanges in Alcohol Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men
creatorChiuve, Stephanie Elizabeth ; Hu, Frank B. ; Rimm, Eric B. ; Joosten, Michel M. ; Mukamal, Kenneth J. ; Hendriks, Henk F. J.
ispartofJoosten, Michel M., Stephanie Elizabeth Chiuve, Kenneth J. Mukamal, Frank B. Hu, Henk F. J. Hendriks, and Eric B. Rimm. 2011. Changes in alcohol consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes in men. Diabetes 60(1): 74-79.
identifierISSN: 0012-1797 ; DOI: 10.2337/db10-1052
descriptionOBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association of 4-year changes in alcohol consumption with a subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 38,031 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of diagnosed diabetes or cancer in 1990. Alcohol consumption was reported on food frequency questionnaires and updated every 4 years. RESULTS: A total of 1,905 cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 428,497 person-years of follow-up. A 7.5 g/day (approximately half a glass) increase in alcohol consumption over 4 years was associated with lower diabetes risk among initial nondrinkers (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 0.78; 95% CI: 0.60–1.00) and drinkers initially consuming <15 g/day (HR 0.89; 95% CI: 0.83–0.96), but not among men initially drinking ≥15 g/day (HR 0.99; 95% CI: 0.95–1.02; Pinteraction < 0.01). A similar pattern was observed for levels of total adiponectin and hemoglobin A1c, with a better metabolic profile among abstainers and light drinkers who modestly increased their alcohol intake, compared with men who either drank less or among men who were already moderate drinkers and increased their intake. Likewise, compared with stable light drinkers (0–4.9 g/day), light drinkers who increased their intake to moderate levels (5.0–29.9 g/day) had a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes (HR 0.75; 95% CI: 0.62–0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Increases in alcohol consumption over time were associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes among initially rare and light drinkers. This lower risk was evident within a 4-year period following increased alcohol intake.
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titleChanges in Alcohol Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men
descriptionOBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association of 4-year changes in alcohol consumption with a subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 38,031 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of diagnosed diabetes or cancer in 1990. Alcohol consumption was reported on food frequency questionnaires and updated every 4 years. RESULTS: A total of 1,905 cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 428,497 person-years of follow-up. A 7.5 g/day (approximately half a glass) increase in alcohol consumption over 4 years was associated with lower diabetes risk among initial nondrinkers (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 0.78; 95% CI: 0.60–1.00) and drinkers initially consuming <15 g/day (HR 0.89; 95% CI: 0.83–0.96), but not among men initially drinking ≥15 g/day (HR 0.99; 95% CI: 0.95–1.02; Pinteraction < 0.01). A similar pattern was observed for levels of total adiponectin and hemoglobin A1c, with a better metabolic profile among abstainers and light drinkers who modestly increased their alcohol intake, compared with men who either drank less or among men who were already moderate drinkers and increased their intake. Likewise, compared with stable light drinkers (0–4.9 g/day), light drinkers who increased their intake to moderate levels (5.0–29.9 g/day) had a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes (HR 0.75; 95% CI: 0.62–0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Increases in alcohol consumption over time were associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes among initially rare and light drinkers. This lower risk was evident within a 4-year period following increased alcohol intake.
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abstractOBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association of 4-year changes in alcohol consumption with a subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 38,031 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of diagnosed diabetes or cancer in 1990. Alcohol consumption was reported on food frequency questionnaires and updated every 4 years. RESULTS: A total of 1,905 cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 428,497 person-years of follow-up. A 7.5 g/day (approximately half a glass) increase in alcohol consumption over 4 years was associated with lower diabetes risk among initial nondrinkers (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 0.78; 95% CI: 0.60–1.00) and drinkers initially consuming <15 g/day (HR 0.89; 95% CI: 0.83–0.96), but not among men initially drinking ≥15 g/day (HR 0.99; 95% CI: 0.95–1.02; Pinteraction < 0.01). A similar pattern was observed for levels of total adiponectin and hemoglobin A1c, with a better metabolic profile among abstainers and light drinkers who modestly increased their alcohol intake, compared with men who either drank less or among men who were already moderate drinkers and increased their intake. Likewise, compared with stable light drinkers (0–4.9 g/day), light drinkers who increased their intake to moderate levels (5.0–29.9 g/day) had a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes (HR 0.75; 95% CI: 0.62–0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Increases in alcohol consumption over time were associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes among initially rare and light drinkers. This lower risk was evident within a 4-year period following increased alcohol intake.
pubAmerican Diabetes Association
doi10.2337/db10-1052
pages74-749
volume60
issue1
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