schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Determining optimal meeting frequency: a bargaining solution to improve a poorly functioning PPP industry under budget constraints

This study uniquely addresses declining business profitability because of a lack of coordinated meetings between the public and private sectors. We determine optimal meeting frequency (i.e., the highest number of regularly scheduled meetings of the Standing Committee of the inter-agency coordination... Full description

Journal Title: Ekonomska Istraživanja 01 January 2019, Vol.32(1), pp.2568-2583
Main Author: Saisomphorn Larhsoukanh
Other Authors: Chengzhang Wang
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
ID: ISSN: 1331-677X ; E-ISSN: 1848-9664 ; DOI: 10.1080/1331677X.2019.1651666
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: doaj_soai_doaj_org_article_940cc322a6d746ef8ded8ae11bbfeee8
title: Determining optimal meeting frequency: a bargaining solution to improve a poorly functioning PPP industry under budget constraints
format: Article
creator:
  • Saisomphorn Larhsoukanh
  • Chengzhang Wang
subjects:
  • Meeting Frequency (Regularly Scheduled Meetings)
  • Inter-Agency Coordination
  • Public-Private Partnership
  • Nash Bargaining Game
  • Shadow Price
  • Laos
  • Economics
ispartof: Ekonomska Istraživanja, 01 January 2019, Vol.32(1), pp.2568-2583
description: This study uniquely addresses declining business profitability because of a lack of coordinated meetings between the public and private sectors. We determine optimal meeting frequency (i.e., the highest number of regularly scheduled meetings of the Standing Committee of the inter-agency coordination per year at which profit can be maximised) for poorly functioning public–private partnership (PPP) industries (i.e., their average return on assets or ROA < 0). The tourism industry in emerging countries such as Laos provides an example of a PPP. Using two-person Nash bargaining theory and given budget constraints, we find that the government should conduct bimonthly meetings to improve PPP industry competitiveness. We believe that our study makes a significant contribution to the literature because few emerging studies use mathematical models to address the problem of public and private sector meeting frequency and collaboration.
language: eng
source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
identifier: ISSN: 1331-677X ; E-ISSN: 1848-9664 ; DOI: 10.1080/1331677X.2019.1651666
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1331-677X
  • 1331677X
  • 1848-9664
  • 18489664
url: Link


@attributes
ID1691437227
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidoai_doaj_org_article_940cc322a6d746ef8ded8ae11bbfeee8
sourceiddoaj_s
recordidTN_doaj_soai_doaj_org_article_940cc322a6d746ef8ded8ae11bbfeee8
sourcesystemOther
dbidDOA
display
typearticle
titleDetermining optimal meeting frequency: a bargaining solution to improve a poorly functioning PPP industry under budget constraints
creatorSaisomphorn Larhsoukanh ; Chengzhang Wang
ispartofEkonomska Istraživanja, 01 January 2019, Vol.32(1), pp.2568-2583
identifier
subjectMeeting Frequency (Regularly Scheduled Meetings) ; Inter-Agency Coordination ; Public-Private Partnership ; Nash Bargaining Game ; Shadow Price ; Laos ; Economics
descriptionThis study uniquely addresses declining business profitability because of a lack of coordinated meetings between the public and private sectors. We determine optimal meeting frequency (i.e., the highest number of regularly scheduled meetings of the Standing Committee of the inter-agency coordination per year at which profit can be maximised) for poorly functioning public–private partnership (PPP) industries (i.e., their average return on assets or ROA < 0). The tourism industry in emerging countries such as Laos provides an example of a PPP. Using two-person Nash bargaining theory and given budget constraints, we find that the government should conduct bimonthly meetings to improve PPP industry competitiveness. We believe that our study makes a significant contribution to the literature because few emerging studies use mathematical models to address the problem of public and private sector meeting frequency and collaboration.
languageeng
oafree_for_read
sourceDirectory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttps://doaj.org/article/940cc322a6d746ef8ded8ae11bbfeee8$$EView_full_text_in_DOAJ
search
creatorcontrib
0Saisomphorn Larhsoukanh
1Chengzhang Wang
titleDetermining optimal meeting frequency: a bargaining solution to improve a poorly functioning PPP industry under budget constraints
description

This study uniquely addresses declining business profitability because of a lack of coordinated meetings between the public and private sectors. We determine optimal meeting frequency (i.e., the highest number of regularly scheduled meetings of the Standing Committee of the inter-agency coordination per year at which profit can be maximised) for poorly functioning public–private partnership (PPP) industries (i.e., their average return on assets or ROA < 0). The tourism industry in emerging countries such as Laos provides an example of a PPP. Using two-person Nash bargaining theory and given budget constraints, we find that the government should conduct bimonthly meetings to improve PPP industry competitiveness. We believe that our study makes a significant contribution to the literature because few emerging studies use mathematical models to address the problem of public and private sector meeting frequency and collaboration.

subject
0Meeting Frequency (Regularly Scheduled Meetings)
1Inter-Agency Coordination
2Public-Private Partnership
3Nash Bargaining Game
4Shadow Price
5Laos
6Economics
general
0English
1Taylor & Francis Group
210.1080/1331677X.2019.1651666
3Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
sourceiddoaj_s
recordiddoaj_soai_doaj_org_article_940cc322a6d746ef8ded8ae11bbfeee8
issn
01331-677X
11331677X
21848-9664
318489664
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2019
addtitleEkonomska Istraživanja
searchscope
0doaj_full
1doaj1
scope
0doaj_full
1doaj1
lsr45$$EView_full_text_in_DOAJ
tmp01Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
tmp02DOA
startdate20190101
enddate20190101
lsr40Ekonomska Istraživanja, 01 January 2019, Vol.32 (1), pp.2568-2583
doi10.1080/1331677X.2019.1651666
citationpf 2568 pt 2583 vol 32 issue 1
sort
titleDetermining optimal meeting frequency: a bargaining solution to improve a poorly functioning PPP industry under budget constraints
authorSaisomphorn Larhsoukanh ; Chengzhang Wang
creationdate20190101
lso0120190101
facets
frbrgroupid8918238272611839153
frbrtype5
newrecords20190904
languageeng
topic
0Meeting Frequency (Regularly Scheduled Meetings)
1Inter-Agency Coordination
2Public-Private Partnership
3Nash Bargaining Game
4Shadow Price
5Laos
6Economics
collectionDirectory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Saisomphorn Larhsoukanh
1Chengzhang Wang
jtitleEkonomska Istraživanja
creationdate2019
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext_linktorsrc
addata
au
0Saisomphorn Larhsoukanh
1Chengzhang Wang
atitleDetermining optimal meeting frequency: a bargaining solution to improve a poorly functioning PPP industry under budget constraints
jtitleEkonomska Istraživanja
risdate20190101
volume32
issue1
spage2568
epage2583
pages2568-2583
issn1331-677X
eissn1848-9664
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstract

This study uniquely addresses declining business profitability because of a lack of coordinated meetings between the public and private sectors. We determine optimal meeting frequency (i.e., the highest number of regularly scheduled meetings of the Standing Committee of the inter-agency coordination per year at which profit can be maximised) for poorly functioning public–private partnership (PPP) industries (i.e., their average return on assets or ROA < 0). The tourism industry in emerging countries such as Laos provides an example of a PPP. Using two-person Nash bargaining theory and given budget constraints, we find that the government should conduct bimonthly meetings to improve PPP industry competitiveness. We believe that our study makes a significant contribution to the literature because few emerging studies use mathematical models to address the problem of public and private sector meeting frequency and collaboration.

pubTaylor & Francis Group
doi10.1080/1331677X.2019.1651666
urlhttps://doaj.org/article/940cc322a6d746ef8ded8ae11bbfeee8
lad01Ekonomska Istraživanja
oafree_for_read
date2019-01-01