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Mini-mental state examination as a predictor of mortality among older people referred to secondary mental healthcare

BACKGROUND: Lower levels of cognitive function have been found to be associated with higher mortality in older people, particularly in dementia, but the association in people with other mental disorders is still inconclusive.METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data were analysed from a large mental health case re... Full description

Journal Title: PLoS ONE 01 January 2014, Vol.9(9), p.e105312
Main Author: Yu-Ping Su
Other Authors: Chin-Kuo Chang , Richard D Hayes , Gayan Perera , Matthew Broadbent , David To , Matthew Hotopf , Robert Stewart
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105312
Zum Text:
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title: Mini-mental state examination as a predictor of mortality among older people referred to secondary mental healthcare
format: Article
creator:
  • Yu-Ping Su
  • Chin-Kuo Chang
  • Richard D Hayes
  • Gayan Perera
  • Matthew Broadbent
  • David To
  • Matthew Hotopf
  • Robert Stewart
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2014, Vol.9(9), p.e105312
description: BACKGROUND: Lower levels of cognitive function have been found to be associated with higher mortality in older people, particularly in dementia, but the association in people with other mental disorders is still inconclusive.METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data were analysed from a large mental health case register serving a geographic catchment of 1.23 million residents, and associations were investigated between cognitive function measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and survival in patients aged 65 years old and over. Cox regressions were carried out, adjusting for age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis, ethnicity, marital status, and area-level socioeconomic index. A total of 6,704 subjects were involved, including 3,368 of them having a dementia diagnosis and 3,336 of them with depression or other diagnoses. Descriptive outcomes by Kaplan-Meier curves showed significant differences between those with normal and impaired cognitive function (MMSE score
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105312
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1932-6203
  • 19326203
url: Link


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titleMini-mental state examination as a predictor of mortality among older people referred to secondary mental healthcare
creatorYu-Ping Su ; Chin-Kuo Chang ; Richard D Hayes ; Gayan Perera ; Matthew Broadbent ; David To ; Matthew Hotopf ; Robert Stewart
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descriptionBACKGROUND: Lower levels of cognitive function have been found to be associated with higher mortality in older people, particularly in dementia, but the association in people with other mental disorders is still inconclusive.METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data were analysed from a large mental health case register serving a geographic catchment of 1.23 million residents, and associations were investigated between cognitive function measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and survival in patients aged 65 years old and over. Cox regressions were carried out, adjusting for age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis, ethnicity, marital status, and area-level socioeconomic index. A total of 6,704 subjects were involved, including 3,368 of them having a dementia diagnosis and 3,336 of them with depression or other diagnoses. Descriptive outcomes by Kaplan-Meier curves showed significant differences between those with normal and impaired cognitive function (MMSE score<25), regardless of a dementia diagnosis. As a whole, the group with lower cognitive function had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.42 (95% CI: 1.28, 1.58) regardless of diagnosis. An HR of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.18, 1.28) per quintile increment of MMSE was also estimated after confounding control. A linear trend of MMSE in quintiles was observed for the subgroups of dementia and other non-dementia diagnoses (both p-values<0.001). However, a threshold effect of MMSE score under 20 was found for the specific diagnosis subgroups of depression.CONCLUSION: Current study identified an association between cognitive impairment and increased mortality in older people using secondary mental health services regardless of a dementia diagnosis. Causal pathways between this exposure and outcome (for example, suboptimal healthcare) need further investigation.
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description

Lower levels of cognitive function have been found to be associated with higher mortality in older people, particularly in dementia, but the association in people with other mental disorders is still inconclusive.Data were analysed from a large mental health case register serving a geographic catchment of 1.23 million residents, and associations were investigated between cognitive function measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and survival in patients aged 65 years old and over. Cox regressions were carried out, adjusting for age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis, ethnicity, marital status, and area-level socioeconomic index. A total of 6,704 subjects were involved, including 3,368 of them having a dementia diagnosis and 3,336 of them with depression or other diagnoses. Descriptive outcomes by Kaplan-Meier curves showed significant differences between those with normal and impaired cognitive function (MMSE score<25), regardless of a dementia diagnosis. As a whole,...

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Lower levels of cognitive function have been found to be associated with higher mortality in older people, particularly in dementia, but the association in people with other mental disorders is still inconclusive.Data were analysed from a large mental health case register serving a geographic catchment of 1.23 million residents, and associations were investigated between cognitive function measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and survival in patients aged 65 years old and over. Cox regressions were carried out, adjusting for age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis, ethnicity, marital status, and area-level socioeconomic index. A total of 6,704 subjects were involved, including 3,368 of them having a dementia diagnosis and 3,336 of them with depression or other diagnoses. Descriptive outcomes by Kaplan-Meier curves showed significant differences between those with normal and impaired cognitive function (MMSE score<25), regardless of a dementia diagnosis. As a whole,...

pubPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
doi10.1371/journal.pone.0105312
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date2014-01-01