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Temperature sensitive liposomes combined with thermal ablation: Effects of duration and timing of heating in mathematical models and in vivo

Temperature sensitive liposomes (TSL) are nanoparticles that rapidly release the contained drug at hyperthermic temperatures, typically above ~40°C. TSL have been combined with various heating modalities, but there is no consensus on required hyperthermia duration or ideal timing of heating relative... Full description

Journal Title: PLoS ONE Vol.12(6), p.e0179131
Main Author: Christian Rossmann
Other Authors: M A Mccrackin , Kent E Armeson , Dieter Haemmerich
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0179131
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recordid: doaj_soai_doaj_org_article_d06dbebf1ab84193b9bd9ccd0c5f4f34
title: Temperature sensitive liposomes combined with thermal ablation: Effects of duration and timing of heating in mathematical models and in vivo
format: Article
creator:
  • Christian Rossmann
  • M A Mccrackin
  • Kent E Armeson
  • Dieter Haemmerich
subjects:
  • Sciences (General)
ispartof: PLoS ONE, Vol.12(6), p.e0179131
description: Temperature sensitive liposomes (TSL) are nanoparticles that rapidly release the contained drug at hyperthermic temperatures, typically above ~40°C. TSL have been combined with various heating modalities, but there is no consensus on required hyperthermia duration or ideal timing of heating relative to TSL administration. The goal of this study was to determine changes in drug uptake when heating duration and timing are varied when combining TSL with radiofrequency ablation (RF) heating.We used computer models to simulate both RF tissue heating and TSL drug delivery, to calculate spatial drug concentration maps. We simulated heating for 5, 12 and 30 min for a single RF electrode, as well as three sequential 12 min ablations for 3 electrodes placed in a triangular array. To support simulation results, we performed porcine in vivo studies in normal liver, where TSL filled with doxorubicin (TSL-Dox) at a dose of 30 mg was infused over 30 min. Following infusion, RF heating was performed in separate liver locations for either 5 min (n = 2) or 12 min (n = 2). After ablation, the animal was euthanized, and liver extracted and frozen. Liver samples were cut orthogonal to the electrode axis, and fluorescence imaging was used to visualize tissue doxorubicin distribution.Both in vivo studies and computer models demonstrate a ring-shaped drug deposition within ~1 cm of the visibly coagulated tissue. Drug uptake directly correlated with heating duration. In computer simulations, drug concentration increased by a factor of 2.2x and 4.3x when heating duration was extended from 5 to either 12, or 30 minutes, respectively. In vivo, drug concentration was by a factor of 2.4x higher at 12 vs 5 min heating duration (7.1 μg/g to 3.0 μg/g). The computer models suggest that heating should be timed to maximize area under the curve of systemic plasma concentration of encapsulated drug.Both computer models and in vivo study demonstrate that tissue drug uptake directly correlates with heating duration for TSL based delivery. Computational models were able to predict the spatial drug delivery profile, and may serve as a valuable tool in understanding and optimizing drug delivery systems.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0179131
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1932-6203
  • 19326203
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titleTemperature sensitive liposomes combined with thermal ablation: Effects of duration and timing of heating in mathematical models and in vivo
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descriptionTemperature sensitive liposomes (TSL) are nanoparticles that rapidly release the contained drug at hyperthermic temperatures, typically above ~40°C. TSL have been combined with various heating modalities, but there is no consensus on required hyperthermia duration or ideal timing of heating relative to TSL administration. The goal of this study was to determine changes in drug uptake when heating duration and timing are varied when combining TSL with radiofrequency ablation (RF) heating.We used computer models to simulate both RF tissue heating and TSL drug delivery, to calculate spatial drug concentration maps. We simulated heating for 5, 12 and 30 min for a single RF electrode, as well as three sequential 12 min ablations for 3 electrodes placed in a triangular array. To support simulation results, we performed porcine in vivo studies in normal liver, where TSL filled with doxorubicin (TSL-Dox) at a dose of 30 mg was infused over 30 min. Following infusion, RF heating was performed in separate liver locations for either 5 min (n = 2) or 12 min (n = 2). After ablation, the animal was euthanized, and liver extracted and frozen. Liver samples were cut orthogonal to the electrode axis, and fluorescence imaging was used to visualize tissue doxorubicin distribution.Both in vivo studies and computer models demonstrate a ring-shaped drug deposition within ~1 cm of the visibly coagulated tissue. Drug uptake directly correlated with heating duration. In computer simulations, drug concentration increased by a factor of 2.2x and 4.3x when heating duration was extended from 5 to either 12, or 30 minutes, respectively. In vivo, drug concentration was by a factor of 2.4x higher at 12 vs 5 min heating duration (7.1 μg/g to 3.0 μg/g). The computer models suggest that heating should be timed to maximize area under the curve of systemic plasma concentration of encapsulated drug.Both computer models and in vivo study demonstrate that tissue drug uptake directly correlates with heating duration for TSL based delivery. Computational models were able to predict the spatial drug delivery profile, and may serve as a valuable tool in understanding and optimizing drug delivery systems.
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Temperature sensitive liposomes (TSL) are nanoparticles that rapidly release the contained drug at hyperthermic temperatures, typically above ~40°C. TSL have been combined with various heating modalities, but there is no consensus on required hyperthermia duration or ideal timing of heating relative to TSL administration. The goal of this study was to determine changes in drug uptake when heating duration and timing are varied when combining TSL with radiofrequency ablation (RF) heating.We used computer models to simulate both RF tissue heating and TSL drug delivery, to calculate spatial drug concentration maps. We simulated heating for 5, 12 and 30 min for a single RF electrode, as well as three sequential 12 min ablations for 3 electrodes placed in a triangular array. To support simulation results, we performed porcine in vivo studies in normal liver, where TSL filled with doxorubicin (TSL-Dox) at a dose of 30 mg was infused over 30 min. Following infusion, RF heating was performed in separate liver locations for either 5 min (n = 2) or 12 min (n = 2). After ablation, the animal was euthanized, and liver extracted and frozen. Liver samples were cut orthogonal to the electrode axis, and fluorescence imaging was used to visualize tissue doxorubicin distribution.Both in vivo studies and computer models demonstrate a ring-shaped drug deposition within ~1 cm of the visibly coagulated tissue. Drug uptake directly correlated with heating duration. In computer simulations, drug concentration increased by a factor of 2.2x and 4.3x when heating duration was extended from 5 to either 12, or 30 minutes, respectively. In vivo, drug concentration was by a factor of 2.4x higher at 12 vs 5 min heating duration (7.1 μg/g to 3.0 μg/g). The computer models suggest that heating should be timed to maximize area under the curve of systemic plasma concentration of encapsulated drug.Both computer models and in vivo study demonstrate that tissue drug uptake directly correlates with heating duration for TSL based delivery. Computational models were able to predict the spatial drug delivery profile, and may serve as a valuable tool in understanding and optimizing drug delivery systems.

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Temperature sensitive liposomes (TSL) are nanoparticles that rapidly release the contained drug at hyperthermic temperatures, typically above ~40°C. TSL have been combined with various heating modalities, but there is no consensus on required hyperthermia duration or ideal timing of heating relative to TSL administration. The goal of this study was to determine changes in drug uptake when heating duration and timing are varied when combining TSL with radiofrequency ablation (RF) heating.We used computer models to simulate both RF tissue heating and TSL drug delivery, to calculate spatial drug concentration maps. We simulated heating for 5, 12 and 30 min for a single RF electrode, as well as three sequential 12 min ablations for 3 electrodes placed in a triangular array. To support simulation results, we performed porcine in vivo studies in normal liver, where TSL filled with doxorubicin (TSL-Dox) at a dose of 30 mg was infused over 30 min. Following infusion, RF heating was performed in separate liver locations for either 5 min (n = 2) or 12 min (n = 2). After ablation, the animal was euthanized, and liver extracted and frozen. Liver samples were cut orthogonal to the electrode axis, and fluorescence imaging was used to visualize tissue doxorubicin distribution.Both in vivo studies and computer models demonstrate a ring-shaped drug deposition within ~1 cm of the visibly coagulated tissue. Drug uptake directly correlated with heating duration. In computer simulations, drug concentration increased by a factor of 2.2x and 4.3x when heating duration was extended from 5 to either 12, or 30 minutes, respectively. In vivo, drug concentration was by a factor of 2.4x higher at 12 vs 5 min heating duration (7.1 μg/g to 3.0 μg/g). The computer models suggest that heating should be timed to maximize area under the curve of systemic plasma concentration of encapsulated drug.Both computer models and in vivo study demonstrate that tissue drug uptake directly correlates with heating duration for TSL based delivery. Computational models were able to predict the spatial drug delivery profile, and may serve as a valuable tool in understanding and optimizing drug delivery systems.

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date2017-06-12