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Meat Quality, Blood Profile, and Fecal Ammonia Concentration of Broiler Supplemented with Liquid Smoke

Liquid smoke is one of the feed additive that can be given to animals. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of liquid smoke given through drinking water on meat quality and production of fecal ammonia in broiler. Variables observed were meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, t... Full description

Journal Title: Media Peternakan 01 December 2014, Vol.37(3), pp.169-174
Main Author: F. Yosi
Other Authors: S. Sandi
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0126-0472 ; E-ISSN: 2087-4634 ; DOI: 10.5398/medpet.2014.37.3.169
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recordid: doaj_soai_doaj_org_article_dafd9d3ec70c41ec9207723cd685b51a
title: Meat Quality, Blood Profile, and Fecal Ammonia Concentration of Broiler Supplemented with Liquid Smoke
format: Article
creator:
  • F. Yosi
  • S. Sandi
subjects:
  • Liquid Smoke
  • Broiler
  • Meat Quality
  • Fecal Ammonia
  • Agriculture
ispartof: Media Peternakan, 01 December 2014, Vol.37(3), pp.169-174
description: Liquid smoke is one of the feed additive that can be given to animals. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of liquid smoke given through drinking water on meat quality and production of fecal ammonia in broiler. Variables observed were meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, cut off strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, and fecal ammonia. The experiment was assigned in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments, and 4 equal replicates. The treatments tested were symbolized as R0, R1, R2, R3, and R4, based on the level of liquid smoke added into drinking water (v/v) namely, 0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, and 1.00%, respectively. The data were subjected to analysis of variance, and continued to Duncan’s multiple range test to determine the difference between treatment mean values at 5% probability. The results indicated that addition of liquid smoke up to 1% did not affect the meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine content, but it decreased the cut off strength of meat and fecal ammonia. It was concluded that an optimal dose of granting liquid smoke through drinking water was 1%.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0126-0472 ; E-ISSN: 2087-4634 ; DOI: 10.5398/medpet.2014.37.3.169
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 0126-0472
  • 01260472
  • 2087-4634
  • 20874634
url: Link


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titleMeat Quality, Blood Profile, and Fecal Ammonia Concentration of Broiler Supplemented with Liquid Smoke
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subjectLiquid Smoke ; Broiler ; Meat Quality ; Fecal Ammonia ; Agriculture
descriptionLiquid smoke is one of the feed additive that can be given to animals. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of liquid smoke given through drinking water on meat quality and production of fecal ammonia in broiler. Variables observed were meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, cut off strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, and fecal ammonia. The experiment was assigned in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments, and 4 equal replicates. The treatments tested were symbolized as R0, R1, R2, R3, and R4, based on the level of liquid smoke added into drinking water (v/v) namely, 0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, and 1.00%, respectively. The data were subjected to analysis of variance, and continued to Duncan’s multiple range test to determine the difference between treatment mean values at 5% probability. The results indicated that addition of liquid smoke up to 1% did not affect the meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine content, but it decreased the cut off strength of meat and fecal ammonia. It was concluded that an optimal dose of granting liquid smoke through drinking water was 1%.
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Liquid smoke is one of the feed additive that can be given to animals. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of liquid smoke given through drinking water on meat quality and production of fecal ammonia in broiler. Variables observed were meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, cut off strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, and fecal ammonia. The experiment was assigned in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments, and 4 equal replicates. The treatments tested were symbolized as R0, R1, R2, R3, and R4, based on the level of liquid smoke added into drinking water (v/v) namely, 0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, and 1.00%, respectively. The data were subjected to analysis of variance, and continued to Duncan’s multiple range test to determine the difference between treatment mean values at 5% probability. The results indicated that addition of liquid smoke up to 1% did not affect the meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine content, but it decreased the cut off strength of meat and fecal ammonia. It was concluded that an optimal dose of granting liquid smoke through drinking water was 1%.

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Liquid smoke is one of the feed additive that can be given to animals. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of liquid smoke given through drinking water on meat quality and production of fecal ammonia in broiler. Variables observed were meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, cut off strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, and fecal ammonia. The experiment was assigned in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments, and 4 equal replicates. The treatments tested were symbolized as R0, R1, R2, R3, and R4, based on the level of liquid smoke added into drinking water (v/v) namely, 0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, and 1.00%, respectively. The data were subjected to analysis of variance, and continued to Duncan’s multiple range test to determine the difference between treatment mean values at 5% probability. The results indicated that addition of liquid smoke up to 1% did not affect the meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, the tensile strength of meat, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine content, but it decreased the cut off strength of meat and fecal ammonia. It was concluded that an optimal dose of granting liquid smoke through drinking water was 1%.

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