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Serum lipid profiles are associated with disability and MRI outcomes in multiple sclerosis

Abstract Background The breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier vascular endothelium is critical for entry of immune cells into the MS brain. Vascular co-morbidities are associated with increased risk of progression. Dyslipidemia, elevated LDL and reduced HDL may increase progression by activating infl... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Neuroinflammation 01 October 2011, Vol.8(1), p.127
Main Author: Weinstock-Guttman Bianca
Other Authors: Zivadinov Robert , Mahfooz Naeem , Carl Ellen , Drake Allison , Schneider Jaclyn , Teter Barbara , Hussein Sara , Mehta Bijal , Weiskopf Marc , Durfee Jacqueline , Bergsland Niels , Ramanathan Murali
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Mri
Quelle: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
ID: ISSN: 1742-2094 ; E-ISSN: 1742-2094 ; DOI: 10.1186/1742-2094-8-127
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recordid: doaj_soai_doaj_org_article_f6653e94c06342b3be77f127683baf40
title: Serum lipid profiles are associated with disability and MRI outcomes in multiple sclerosis
format: Article
creator:
  • Weinstock-Guttman Bianca
  • Zivadinov Robert
  • Mahfooz Naeem
  • Carl Ellen
  • Drake Allison
  • Schneider Jaclyn
  • Teter Barbara
  • Hussein Sara
  • Mehta Bijal
  • Weiskopf Marc
  • Durfee Jacqueline
  • Bergsland Niels
  • Ramanathan Murali
subjects:
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Diet
  • Lipid Profile
  • Mri
  • Environmental Factors
  • Gene-Environment Interactions
  • Lesion Volume
  • Brain Atrophy
  • Medicine
ispartof: Journal of Neuroinflammation, 01 October 2011, Vol.8(1), p.127
description: Abstract Background The breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier vascular endothelium is critical for entry of immune cells into the MS brain. Vascular co-morbidities are associated with increased risk of progression. Dyslipidemia, elevated LDL and reduced HDL may increase progression by activating inflammatory processes at the vascular endothelium. Objective To assess the associations of serum lipid profile variables (triglycerides, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL, LDL) and total cholesterol) with disability and MRI measures in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods This study included 492 MS patients (age: 47.1 ± 10.8 years; disease duration: 12.8 ± 10.1 years) with baseline and follow-up Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) assessments after a mean period of 2.2 ± 1.0 years. The associations of baseline lipid profile variables with disability changes were assessed. Quantitative MRI findings at baseline were available for 210 patients. Results EDSS worsening was associated with higher baseline LDL (p = 0.006) and total cholesterol (p = 0.001, 0.008) levels, with trends for higher triglyceride (p = 0.025); HDL was not associated. A similar pattern was found for MSSS worsening. Higher HDL levels (p < 0.001) were associated with lower contrast-enhancing lesion volume. Higher total cholesterol was associated with a trend for lower brain parenchymal fraction (p = 0.033). Conclusions Serum lipid profile has modest effects on disease progression in MS. Worsening disability is associated with higher levels of LDL, total cholesterol and triglycerides. Higher HDL is associated with lower levels of acute inflammatory activity.
language: eng
source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
identifier: ISSN: 1742-2094 ; E-ISSN: 1742-2094 ; DOI: 10.1186/1742-2094-8-127
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1742-2094
  • 17422094
url: Link


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titleSerum lipid profiles are associated with disability and MRI outcomes in multiple sclerosis
creatorWeinstock-Guttman Bianca ; Zivadinov Robert ; Mahfooz Naeem ; Carl Ellen ; Drake Allison ; Schneider Jaclyn ; Teter Barbara ; Hussein Sara ; Mehta Bijal ; Weiskopf Marc ; Durfee Jacqueline ; Bergsland Niels ; Ramanathan Murali
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subjectMultiple Sclerosis ; Diet ; Lipid Profile ; Mri ; Environmental Factors ; Gene-Environment Interactions ; Lesion Volume ; Brain Atrophy ; Medicine
descriptionAbstract Background The breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier vascular endothelium is critical for entry of immune cells into the MS brain. Vascular co-morbidities are associated with increased risk of progression. Dyslipidemia, elevated LDL and reduced HDL may increase progression by activating inflammatory processes at the vascular endothelium. Objective To assess the associations of serum lipid profile variables (triglycerides, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL, LDL) and total cholesterol) with disability and MRI measures in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods This study included 492 MS patients (age: 47.1 ± 10.8 years; disease duration: 12.8 ± 10.1 years) with baseline and follow-up Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) assessments after a mean period of 2.2 ± 1.0 years. The associations of baseline lipid profile variables with disability changes were assessed. Quantitative MRI findings at baseline were available for 210 patients. Results EDSS worsening was associated with higher baseline LDL (p = 0.006) and total cholesterol (p = 0.001, 0.008) levels, with trends for higher triglyceride (p = 0.025); HDL was not associated. A similar pattern was found for MSSS worsening. Higher HDL levels (p < 0.001) were associated with lower contrast-enhancing lesion volume. Higher total cholesterol was associated with a trend for lower brain parenchymal fraction (p = 0.033). Conclusions Serum lipid profile has modest effects on disease progression in MS. Worsening disability is associated with higher levels of LDL, total cholesterol and triglycerides. Higher HDL is associated with lower levels of acute inflammatory activity.
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titleSerum lipid profiles are associated with disability and MRI outcomes in multiple sclerosis
description

Abstract Background The breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier vascular endothelium is critical for entry of immune cells into the MS brain. Vascular co-morbidities are associated with increased risk of progression. Dyslipidemia, elevated LDL and reduced HDL may increase progression by activating inflammatory processes at the vascular endothelium. Objective To assess the associations of serum lipid profile variables (triglycerides, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL, LDL) and total cholesterol) with disability and MRI measures in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods This study included 492 MS patients (age: 47.1 ± 10.8 years; disease duration: 12.8 ± 10.1 years) with baseline and follow-up Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) assessments after a mean period of 2.2 ± 1.0 years. The associations of baseline lipid profile variables with disability changes were assessed. Quantitative MRI findings at baseline were available for 210 patients. Results EDSS worsening was associated with higher baseline LDL (p = 0.006) and total cholesterol (p = 0.001, 0.008) levels, with trends for higher triglyceride (p = 0.025); HDL was not associated. A similar pattern was found for MSSS worsening. Higher HDL levels (p < 0.001) were associated with lower contrast-enhancing lesion volume. Higher total cholesterol was associated with a trend for lower brain parenchymal fraction (p = 0.033). Conclusions Serum lipid profile has modest effects on disease progression in MS. Worsening disability is associated with higher levels of LDL, total cholesterol and triglycerides. Higher HDL is associated with lower levels of acute inflammatory activity.

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Abstract Background The breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier vascular endothelium is critical for entry of immune cells into the MS brain. Vascular co-morbidities are associated with increased risk of progression. Dyslipidemia, elevated LDL and reduced HDL may increase progression by activating inflammatory processes at the vascular endothelium. Objective To assess the associations of serum lipid profile variables (triglycerides, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL, LDL) and total cholesterol) with disability and MRI measures in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods This study included 492 MS patients (age: 47.1 ± 10.8 years; disease duration: 12.8 ± 10.1 years) with baseline and follow-up Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) assessments after a mean period of 2.2 ± 1.0 years. The associations of baseline lipid profile variables with disability changes were assessed. Quantitative MRI findings at baseline were available for 210 patients. Results EDSS worsening was associated with higher baseline LDL (p = 0.006) and total cholesterol (p = 0.001, 0.008) levels, with trends for higher triglyceride (p = 0.025); HDL was not associated. A similar pattern was found for MSSS worsening. Higher HDL levels (p < 0.001) were associated with lower contrast-enhancing lesion volume. Higher total cholesterol was associated with a trend for lower brain parenchymal fraction (p = 0.033). Conclusions Serum lipid profile has modest effects on disease progression in MS. Worsening disability is associated with higher levels of LDL, total cholesterol and triglycerides. Higher HDL is associated with lower levels of acute inflammatory activity.

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