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Acceptability of Sodium-Reduced Research Diets, Including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, among Adults with Prehypertension and Stage 1 Hypertension

Abstract Objective Examine the acceptability of sodium-reduced research diets. Design Randomized crossover trial of three sodium levels for 30 days each among participants randomly assigned to one of two dietary patterns. Participants/setting Three hundred fifty-four adults with prehypertension or s... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2007, Vol.107 (9), p.1530-1538
Main Author: Karanja, Njeri, PhD
Other Authors: Lancaster, Kristie J., PhD, RD , Vollmer, William M., PhD , Lin, Pao-Hwa, PhD , Most, Marlene M., PhD, RD, FADA , Ard, Jamy D., MD , Swain, Janis F., MS, RD , Sacks, Frank M., MD , Obarzanek, Eva, PhD, RD
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
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Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: New York, NY: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0002-8223
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3219218
title: Acceptability of Sodium-Reduced Research Diets, Including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, among Adults with Prehypertension and Stage 1 Hypertension
format: Article
creator:
  • Karanja, Njeri, PhD
  • Lancaster, Kristie J., PhD, RD
  • Vollmer, William M., PhD
  • Lin, Pao-Hwa, PhD
  • Most, Marlene M., PhD, RD, FADA
  • Ard, Jamy D., MD
  • Swain, Janis F., MS, RD
  • Sacks, Frank M., MD
  • Obarzanek, Eva, PhD, RD
subjects:
  • African Americans - psychology
  • Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension
  • Article
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood and lymphatic vessels
  • Blood Pressure - drug effects
  • Cardiology. Vascular system
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Dairy Products
  • Diet therapy
  • Diet, Sodium-Restricted - methods
  • Diet, Sodium-Restricted - psychology
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
  • Female
  • Fruit
  • Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Health aspects
  • Humans
  • Hypertension
  • Hypertension - diet therapy
  • Internal Medicine
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Metabolic diseases
  • Middle Aged
  • Nutritional aspects
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Salt-free diet
  • Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
  • Sodium, Dietary - adverse effects
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Vegetables
ispartof: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 2007, Vol.107 (9), p.1530-1538
description: Abstract Objective Examine the acceptability of sodium-reduced research diets. Design Randomized crossover trial of three sodium levels for 30 days each among participants randomly assigned to one of two dietary patterns. Participants/setting Three hundred fifty-four adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension who were participants in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH-Sodium) outpatient feeding trial. Intervention Participants received their assigned diet (control or DASH, rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products), each at three levels of sodium (higher, intermediate, and lower) corresponding to 3,500, 2,300, and 1,200 mg/day (150, 100, and 50 mmol/day) per 2,100 kcal. Main outcome measures Nine-item questionnaire on liking and willingness to continue the assigned diet and its level of saltiness using a nine-point scale, ranging from one to nine. Statistical analyses performed Generalized estimating equations to test participant ratings as a function of sodium level and diet while adjusting for site, feeding cohort, carryover effects, and ratings during run-in. Results Overall, participants rated the saltiness of the intermediate level sodium as most acceptable (DASH group: 5.5 for intermediate vs 4.5 and 4.4 for higher and lower sodium; control group: 5.7 for intermediate vs 4.9 and 4.7 for higher and lower sodium) and rated liking and willing to continue the DASH diet more than the control diet by about one point (ratings range from 5.6 to 6.6 for DASH diet and 5.2 to 6.1 for control diet). Small race differences were observed in sodium and diet acceptability. Conclusions Both the intermediate and lower sodium levels of each diet are at least as acceptable as the higher sodium level in persons with or at risk for hypertension.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0002-8223
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-8223
  • 1878-3570
url: Link


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titleAcceptability of Sodium-Reduced Research Diets, Including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, among Adults with Prehypertension and Stage 1 Hypertension
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creatorKaranja, Njeri, PhD ; Lancaster, Kristie J., PhD, RD ; Vollmer, William M., PhD ; Lin, Pao-Hwa, PhD ; Most, Marlene M., PhD, RD, FADA ; Ard, Jamy D., MD ; Swain, Janis F., MS, RD ; Sacks, Frank M., MD ; Obarzanek, Eva, PhD, RD
creatorcontribKaranja, Njeri, PhD ; Lancaster, Kristie J., PhD, RD ; Vollmer, William M., PhD ; Lin, Pao-Hwa, PhD ; Most, Marlene M., PhD, RD, FADA ; Ard, Jamy D., MD ; Swain, Janis F., MS, RD ; Sacks, Frank M., MD ; Obarzanek, Eva, PhD, RD
descriptionAbstract Objective Examine the acceptability of sodium-reduced research diets. Design Randomized crossover trial of three sodium levels for 30 days each among participants randomly assigned to one of two dietary patterns. Participants/setting Three hundred fifty-four adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension who were participants in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH-Sodium) outpatient feeding trial. Intervention Participants received their assigned diet (control or DASH, rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products), each at three levels of sodium (higher, intermediate, and lower) corresponding to 3,500, 2,300, and 1,200 mg/day (150, 100, and 50 mmol/day) per 2,100 kcal. Main outcome measures Nine-item questionnaire on liking and willingness to continue the assigned diet and its level of saltiness using a nine-point scale, ranging from one to nine. Statistical analyses performed Generalized estimating equations to test participant ratings as a function of sodium level and diet while adjusting for site, feeding cohort, carryover effects, and ratings during run-in. Results Overall, participants rated the saltiness of the intermediate level sodium as most acceptable (DASH group: 5.5 for intermediate vs 4.5 and 4.4 for higher and lower sodium; control group: 5.7 for intermediate vs 4.9 and 4.7 for higher and lower sodium) and rated liking and willing to continue the DASH diet more than the control diet by about one point (ratings range from 5.6 to 6.6 for DASH diet and 5.2 to 6.1 for control diet). Small race differences were observed in sodium and diet acceptability. Conclusions Both the intermediate and lower sodium levels of each diet are at least as acceptable as the higher sodium level in persons with or at risk for hypertension.
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subjectAfrican Americans - psychology ; Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension ; Article ; Biological and medical sciences ; Blood and lymphatic vessels ; Blood Pressure - drug effects ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Cross-Over Studies ; Dairy Products ; Diet therapy ; Diet, Sodium-Restricted - methods ; Diet, Sodium-Restricted - psychology ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology ; Female ; Fruit ; Gastroenterology and Hepatology ; Health aspects ; Humans ; Hypertension ; Hypertension - diet therapy ; Internal Medicine ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Metabolic diseases ; Middle Aged ; Nutritional aspects ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care ; Patient Satisfaction ; Salt-free diet ; Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage ; Sodium, Dietary - adverse effects ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Vegetables
ispartofJournal of the American Dietetic Association, 2007, Vol.107 (9), p.1530-1538
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2Vollmer, William M., PhD
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4Most, Marlene M., PhD, RD, FADA
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6Swain, Janis F., MS, RD
7Sacks, Frank M., MD
8Obarzanek, Eva, PhD, RD
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0Acceptability of Sodium-Reduced Research Diets, Including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, among Adults with Prehypertension and Stage 1 Hypertension
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descriptionAbstract Objective Examine the acceptability of sodium-reduced research diets. Design Randomized crossover trial of three sodium levels for 30 days each among participants randomly assigned to one of two dietary patterns. Participants/setting Three hundred fifty-four adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension who were participants in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH-Sodium) outpatient feeding trial. Intervention Participants received their assigned diet (control or DASH, rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products), each at three levels of sodium (higher, intermediate, and lower) corresponding to 3,500, 2,300, and 1,200 mg/day (150, 100, and 50 mmol/day) per 2,100 kcal. Main outcome measures Nine-item questionnaire on liking and willingness to continue the assigned diet and its level of saltiness using a nine-point scale, ranging from one to nine. Statistical analyses performed Generalized estimating equations to test participant ratings as a function of sodium level and diet while adjusting for site, feeding cohort, carryover effects, and ratings during run-in. Results Overall, participants rated the saltiness of the intermediate level sodium as most acceptable (DASH group: 5.5 for intermediate vs 4.5 and 4.4 for higher and lower sodium; control group: 5.7 for intermediate vs 4.9 and 4.7 for higher and lower sodium) and rated liking and willing to continue the DASH diet more than the control diet by about one point (ratings range from 5.6 to 6.6 for DASH diet and 5.2 to 6.1 for control diet). Small race differences were observed in sodium and diet acceptability. Conclusions Both the intermediate and lower sodium levels of each diet are at least as acceptable as the higher sodium level in persons with or at risk for hypertension.
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0African Americans - psychology
1Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension
2Article
3Biological and medical sciences
4Blood and lymphatic vessels
5Blood Pressure - drug effects
6Cardiology. Vascular system
7Cross-Over Studies
8Dairy Products
9Diet therapy
10Diet, Sodium-Restricted - methods
11Diet, Sodium-Restricted - psychology
12Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
13European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
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16Gastroenterology and Hepatology
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21Internal Medicine
22Male
23Medical sciences
24Metabolic diseases
25Middle Aged
26Nutritional aspects
27Patient Acceptance of Health Care
28Patient Satisfaction
29Salt-free diet
30Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
31Sodium, Dietary - adverse effects
32Surveys and Questionnaires
33Vegetables
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titleAcceptability of Sodium-Reduced Research Diets, Including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, among Adults with Prehypertension and Stage 1 Hypertension
authorKaranja, Njeri, PhD ; Lancaster, Kristie J., PhD, RD ; Vollmer, William M., PhD ; Lin, Pao-Hwa, PhD ; Most, Marlene M., PhD, RD, FADA ; Ard, Jamy D., MD ; Swain, Janis F., MS, RD ; Sacks, Frank M., MD ; Obarzanek, Eva, PhD, RD
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7Cross-Over Studies
8Dairy Products
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10Diet, Sodium-Restricted - methods
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12Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
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abstractAbstract Objective Examine the acceptability of sodium-reduced research diets. Design Randomized crossover trial of three sodium levels for 30 days each among participants randomly assigned to one of two dietary patterns. Participants/setting Three hundred fifty-four adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension who were participants in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH-Sodium) outpatient feeding trial. Intervention Participants received their assigned diet (control or DASH, rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products), each at three levels of sodium (higher, intermediate, and lower) corresponding to 3,500, 2,300, and 1,200 mg/day (150, 100, and 50 mmol/day) per 2,100 kcal. Main outcome measures Nine-item questionnaire on liking and willingness to continue the assigned diet and its level of saltiness using a nine-point scale, ranging from one to nine. Statistical analyses performed Generalized estimating equations to test participant ratings as a function of sodium level and diet while adjusting for site, feeding cohort, carryover effects, and ratings during run-in. Results Overall, participants rated the saltiness of the intermediate level sodium as most acceptable (DASH group: 5.5 for intermediate vs 4.5 and 4.4 for higher and lower sodium; control group: 5.7 for intermediate vs 4.9 and 4.7 for higher and lower sodium) and rated liking and willing to continue the DASH diet more than the control diet by about one point (ratings range from 5.6 to 6.6 for DASH diet and 5.2 to 6.1 for control diet). Small race differences were observed in sodium and diet acceptability. Conclusions Both the intermediate and lower sodium levels of each diet are at least as acceptable as the higher sodium level in persons with or at risk for hypertension.
copNew York, NY
pubElsevier Inc
pmid17761230
doi10.1016/j.jada.2007.06.013
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