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Quantification of the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal over the motor cortex using concurrent NIRS-fMRI measurements

Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occurring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back... Full description

Journal Title: NeuroImage 15 February 2012, Vol.59(4), pp.3933-3940
Main Author: Gagnon, Louis
Other Authors: Yücel, Meryem A , Dehaes, Mathieu , Cooper, Robert J , Perdue, Katherine L , Selb, Juliette , Huppert, Theodore J , Hoge, Richard D , Boas, David A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1053-8119 ; E-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.10.054
Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811911012183
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recordid: elsevier_sdoi_10_1016_j_neuroimage_2011_10_054
title: Quantification of the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal over the motor cortex using concurrent NIRS-fMRI measurements
format: Article
creator:
  • Gagnon, Louis
  • Yücel, Meryem A
  • Dehaes, Mathieu
  • Cooper, Robert J
  • Perdue, Katherine L
  • Selb, Juliette
  • Huppert, Theodore J
  • Hoge, Richard D
  • Boas, David A
subjects:
  • NIRS-Fmri
  • Pial Vasculature
  • Balloon Model
  • Monte Carlo Simulations
  • Medicine
ispartof: NeuroImage, 15 February 2012, Vol.59(4), pp.3933-3940
description: Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occurring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back-reflection geometry of the NIRS measurement renders the signal very sensitive to these superficial pial veins. As such, the measured NIRS signal contains contributions from both the cortical region as well as the pial vasculature. In this work, the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal was investigated using (1) Monte Carlo simulations over a realistic geometry constructed from anatomical and vascular MRI and (2) multimodal NIRS-BOLD recordings during motor stimulation. A good agreement was found between the simulations and the modeling analysis of measurements. Our results suggest that the cortical contribution to the deoxyhemoglobin signal change (...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119 ; E-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.10.054
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1053-8119
  • 10538119
  • 1095-9572
  • 10959572
url: Link


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titleQuantification of the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal over the motor cortex using concurrent NIRS-fMRI measurements
creatorGagnon, Louis ; Yücel, Meryem A ; Dehaes, Mathieu ; Cooper, Robert J ; Perdue, Katherine L ; Selb, Juliette ; Huppert, Theodore J ; Hoge, Richard D ; Boas, David A
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subjectNIRS-Fmri ; Pial Vasculature ; Balloon Model ; Monte Carlo Simulations ; Medicine
descriptionNear-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occurring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back-reflection geometry of the NIRS measurement renders the signal very sensitive to these superficial pial veins. As such, the measured NIRS signal contains contributions from both the cortical region as well as the pial vasculature. In this work, the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal was investigated using (1) Monte Carlo simulations over a realistic geometry constructed from anatomical and vascular MRI and (2) multimodal NIRS-BOLD recordings during motor stimulation. A good agreement was found between the simulations and the modeling analysis of measurements. Our results suggest that the cortical contribution to the deoxyhemoglobin signal change (...
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titleQuantification of the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal over the motor cortex using concurrent NIRS-fMRI measurements
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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occurring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back-reflection geometry of the NIRS measurement renders the signal very sensitive to these superficial pial veins. As such, the measured NIRS signal contains contributions from both the cortical region as well as the pial vasculature. In this work, the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal was investigated using (1) Monte Carlo simulations over a realistic geometry constructed from anatomical and vascular MRI and (2) multimodal NIRS-BOLD recordings during motor stimulation. A good agreement was found between the simulations and the modeling analysis of

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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occurring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back-reflection geometry of the NIRS measurement renders the signal very sensitive to these superficial pial veins. As such, the measured NIRS signal contains contributions from both the cortical region as well as the pial vasculature. In this work, the cortical contribution to the NIRS signal was investigated using (1) Monte Carlo simulations over a realistic geometry constructed from anatomical and vascular MRI and (2) multimodal NIRS-BOLD recordings during motor stimulation. A good agreement was found between the simulations and the modeling analysis of

measurements. Our results suggest that the cortical contribution to the deoxyhemoglobin signal change (

...
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date2012-02-15