schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Proportionate universalism in practice? A quasi-experimental study (GoWell) of a UK neighbourhood renewal programme's impact on health inequalities

Recommendations to reduce health inequalities frequently emphasise improvements to socio-environmental determinants of health. Proponents of ‘proportionate universalism’ argue that such improvements should be allocated proportionally to population need. We tested whether city-wide investment in urba... Full description

Journal Title: Social Science & Medicine March 2016, Vol.152, pp.41-49
Main Author: Egan, Matt
Other Authors: Kearns, Ade , Katikireddi, Srinivasa V , Curl, Angela , Lawson, Kenny , Tannahill, Carol
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; E-ISSN: 1873-5347 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.026
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: elsevier_sdoi_10_1016_j_socscimed_2016_01_026
title: Proportionate universalism in practice? A quasi-experimental study (GoWell) of a UK neighbourhood renewal programme's impact on health inequalities
format: Article
creator:
  • Egan, Matt
  • Kearns, Ade
  • Katikireddi, Srinivasa V
  • Curl, Angela
  • Lawson, Kenny
  • Tannahill, Carol
subjects:
  • Neighbourhood Renewal
  • Health Inequalities
  • Proportionate Universalism
  • Natural Experiment
  • Medicine
  • Social Sciences (General)
  • Public Health
ispartof: Social Science & Medicine, March 2016, Vol.152, pp.41-49
description: Recommendations to reduce health inequalities frequently emphasise improvements to socio-environmental determinants of health. Proponents of ‘proportionate universalism’ argue that such improvements should be allocated proportionally to population need. We tested whether city-wide investment in urban renewal in Glasgow (UK) was allocated to ‘need’ and whether this reduced health inequalities. We identified a longitudinal cohort (n = 1006) through data linkage across surveys conducted in 2006 and 2011 in 14 differentially disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Each neighbourhood received renewal investment during that time, allocated on the basis of housing need. We grouped neighbourhoods into those receiving ‘higher’, ‘medium’ or ‘lower’ levels of investment. We compared residents' self-reported physical and mental health between these three groups over time using the SF-12 version 2 instrument. Multiple linear regression adjusted for baseline gender, age, education, household structure,...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; E-ISSN: 1873-5347 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.026
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0277-9536
  • 02779536
  • 1873-5347
  • 18735347
url: Link


@attributes
ID1523563536
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordiddoi_10_1016_j_socscimed_2016_01_026
sourceidelsevier_s
recordidTN_elsevier_sdoi_10_1016_j_socscimed_2016_01_026
sourcesystemPC
dbid
0--K
1--M
2.~1
31B1
41RT
51~.
6457
74G.
87-5
98P~
109JM
119JO
12AABNK
13AAEDT
14AAFJI
15AAFTH
16AAGJA
17AAGUQ
18AAKOC
19AAOAW
20AAQFI
21ABBQC
22ABFNM
23ABMMH
24ABMZM
25ABYKQ
26ACDAQ
27ACRLP
28ACXNI
29AEKER
30AFKWA
31AFTJW
32AFXIZ
33AGHFR
34AGUBO
35AGYEJ
36AHHHB
37AIKHN
38AITUG
39AJBFU
40AJOXV
41AJRQY
42AMFUW
43ANZVX
44AOMHK
45AVARZ
46BLXMC
47BNPGV
48EO8
49EO9
50EP2
51EP3
52FDB
53FGOYB
54FIRID
55FNPLU
56G-Q
57GBLVA
58HEH
59HMK
60HMO
61HMY
62J1W
63KOM
64LCYCR
65OAUVE
66OKEIE
67P-8
68P-9
69PC.
70PRBVW
71Q38
72R2-
73RPZ
74SAE
75SCC
76SDF
77SDG
78SDP
79SES
80SEW
81SSB
82SSH
83SSO
84SSS
85SSY
86SSZ
87T5K
88~G-
pqid1767069640
galeid456924139
display
typearticle
titleProportionate universalism in practice? A quasi-experimental study (GoWell) of a UK neighbourhood renewal programme's impact on health inequalities
creatorEgan, Matt ; Kearns, Ade ; Katikireddi, Srinivasa V ; Curl, Angela ; Lawson, Kenny ; Tannahill, Carol
ispartofSocial Science & Medicine, March 2016, Vol.152, pp.41-49
identifier
subjectNeighbourhood Renewal ; Health Inequalities ; Proportionate Universalism ; Natural Experiment ; Medicine ; Social Sciences (General) ; Public Health
descriptionRecommendations to reduce health inequalities frequently emphasise improvements to socio-environmental determinants of health. Proponents of ‘proportionate universalism’ argue that such improvements should be allocated proportionally to population need. We tested whether city-wide investment in urban renewal in Glasgow (UK) was allocated to ‘need’ and whether this reduced health inequalities. We identified a longitudinal cohort (n = 1006) through data linkage across surveys conducted in 2006 and 2011 in 14 differentially disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Each neighbourhood received renewal investment during that time, allocated on the basis of housing need. We grouped neighbourhoods into those receiving ‘higher’, ‘medium’ or ‘lower’ levels of investment. We compared residents' self-reported physical and mental health between these three groups over time using the SF-12 version 2 instrument. Multiple linear regression adjusted for baseline gender, age, education, household structure,...
languageeng
oafree_for_read
source
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953616300260$$EView_full_text_in_ScienceDirect
search
creatorcontrib
0Egan, Matt
1Kearns, Ade
2Katikireddi, Srinivasa V
3Curl, Angela
4Lawson, Kenny
5Tannahill, Carol
titleProportionate universalism in practice? A quasi-experimental study (GoWell) of a UK neighbourhood renewal programme's impact on health inequalities
description

Recommendations to reduce health inequalities frequently emphasise improvements to socio-environmental determinants of health. Proponents of ‘proportionate universalism’ argue that such improvements should be allocated proportionally to population need. We tested whether city-wide investment in urban renewal in Glasgow (UK) was allocated to ‘need’ and whether this reduced health inequalities. We identified a longitudinal cohort (n = 1006) through data linkage across surveys conducted in 2006 and 2011 in 14 differentially disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Each neighbourhood received renewal investment during that time, allocated on the basis of housing need. We grouped neighbourhoods into those receiving ‘higher’, ‘medium’ or ‘lower’ levels of investment. We compared residents' self-reported physical and mental health between these three groups over time using the SF-12 version 2 instrument. Multiple linear regression adjusted for baseline gender, age, education, household structure,...

subject
0Neighbourhood Renewal
1Health Inequalities
2Proportionate Universalism
3Natural Experiment
4Medicine
5Social Sciences (General)
6Public Health
general
0English
1Elsevier Ltd
210.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.026
3ScienceDirect (Elsevier)
4ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
sourceidelsevier_s
recordidelsevier_sdoi_10_1016_j_socscimed_2016_01_026
issn
00277-9536
102779536
21873-5347
318735347
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2016
addtitleSocial Science & Medicine
searchscope
0elsevier_full
1elsevier4
2elsevier2
scope
0elsevier_full
1elsevier4
2elsevier2
lsr45$$EView_full_text_in_ScienceDirect
tmp01ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
tmp02
0--K
1--M
2.~1
31B1
41RT
51~.
6457
74G.
87-5
98P~
109JM
119JO
12AABNK
13AAEDT
14AAFJI
15AAFTH
16AAGJA
17AAGUQ
18AAKOC
19AAOAW
20AAQFI
21ABBQC
22ABFNM
23ABMMH
24ABMZM
25ABYKQ
26ACDAQ
27ACRLP
28ACXNI
29AEKER
30AFKWA
31AFTJW
32AFXIZ
33AGHFR
34AGUBO
35AGYEJ
36AHHHB
37AIKHN
38AITUG
39AJBFU
40AJOXV
41AJRQY
42AMFUW
43ANZVX
44AOMHK
45AVARZ
46BLXMC
47BNPGV
48EO8
49EO9
50EP2
51EP3
52FDB
53FGOYB
54FIRID
55FNPLU
56G-Q
57GBLVA
58HEH
59HMK
60HMO
61HMY
62J1W
63KOM
64LCYCR
65OAUVE
66OKEIE
67P-8
68P-9
69PC.
70PRBVW
71Q38
72R2-
73RPZ
74SAE
75SCC
76SDF
77SDG
78SDP
79SES
80SEW
81SSB
82SSH
83SSO
84SSS
85SSY
86SSZ
87T5K
88~G-
startdate20160301
enddate20160331
lsr40Social Science & Medicine, March 2016, Vol.152, pp.41-49
doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.026
citationpf 41 pt 49 vol 152
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, galeid, orcidid]
sort
titleProportionate universalism in practice? A quasi-experimental study (GoWell) of a UK neighbourhood renewal programme's impact on health inequalities
authorEgan, Matt ; Kearns, Ade ; Katikireddi, Srinivasa V ; Curl, Angela ; Lawson, Kenny ; Tannahill, Carol
creationdate20160300
lso0120160300
facets
frbrgroupid-520451965537860721
frbrtype5
newrecords20190904
languageeng
topic
0Neighbourhood Renewal
1Health Inequalities
2Proportionate Universalism
3Natural Experiment
4Medicine
5Social Sciences (General)
6Public Health
collectionScienceDirect (Elsevier)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Egan, Matt
1Kearns, Ade
2Katikireddi, Srinivasa V
3Curl, Angela
4Lawson, Kenny
5Tannahill, Carol
jtitleSocial Science & Medicine
creationdate2016
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Egan
1Kearns
2Katikireddi
3Curl
4Lawson
5Tannahill
aufirst
0Matt
1Ade
2Srinivasa V
3Angela
4Kenny
5Carol
auinitM
auinit1M
au
0Egan, Matt
1Kearns, Ade
2Katikireddi, Srinivasa V
3Curl, Angela
4Lawson, Kenny
5Tannahill, Carol
atitleProportionate universalism in practice? A quasi-experimental study (GoWell) of a UK neighbourhood renewal programme's impact on health inequalities
jtitleSocial Science & Medicine
risdate201603
volume152
spage41
epage49
pages41-49
issn0277-9536
eissn1873-5347
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstract

Recommendations to reduce health inequalities frequently emphasise improvements to socio-environmental determinants of health. Proponents of ‘proportionate universalism’ argue that such improvements should be allocated proportionally to population need. We tested whether city-wide investment in urban renewal in Glasgow (UK) was allocated to ‘need’ and whether this reduced health inequalities. We identified a longitudinal cohort (n = 1006) through data linkage across surveys conducted in 2006 and 2011 in 14 differentially disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Each neighbourhood received renewal investment during that time, allocated on the basis of housing need. We grouped neighbourhoods into those receiving ‘higher’, ‘medium’ or ‘lower’ levels of investment. We compared residents' self-reported physical and mental health between these three groups over time using the SF-12 version 2 instrument. Multiple linear regression adjusted for baseline gender, age, education, household structure,...

pubElsevier Ltd
doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.026
lad01Social Science & Medicine
oafree_for_read
orcidid0000-0002-4040-200X
date2016-03