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Comparison of Asian porcine high fever disease isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to United States isolates for their ability to cause disease and secondary bacterial infection in swine

•Both Asian HP-PRRSV isolates and US PRRSV isolates varied in virulence.•The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the virulence of the PRRSV strains evaluated.•Serum cytokine levels tended to be lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected wit... Full description

Journal Title: Veterinary microbiology 2017-05, Vol.203, p.6-17
Main Author: Brockmeier, Susan L
Other Authors: Loving, Crystal L , Palmer, Mitchel V , Spear, Allyn , Nicholson, Tracy L , Faaberg, Kay S , Lager, Kelly M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Netherlands: Elsevier B.V
ID: ISSN: 0378-1135
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28619168
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title: Comparison of Asian porcine high fever disease isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to United States isolates for their ability to cause disease and secondary bacterial infection in swine
format: Article
creator:
  • Brockmeier, Susan L
  • Loving, Crystal L
  • Palmer, Mitchel V
  • Spear, Allyn
  • Nicholson, Tracy L
  • Faaberg, Kay S
  • Lager, Kelly M
subjects:
  • Actinobacillus suis
  • Animals
  • Bacterial pneumonia
  • Coinfection - veterinary
  • Comorbidity
  • Comparative analysis
  • Development and progression
  • Disease Susceptibility - veterinary
  • Female
  • Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
  • Haemophilus Infections - pathology
  • Haemophilus Infections - veterinary
  • Haemophilus parasuis
  • Haemophilus parasuis - pathogenicity
  • Highly pathogenic PRRSV
  • Lung - microbiology
  • Lung - pathology
  • Pathogenesis
  • Pneumonia
  • Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome
  • Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - pathology
  • Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - virology
  • Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus
  • Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus - pathogenicity
  • Porcine respiratory disease complex
  • PRDC
  • PRRSV
  • Secondary bacterial infection
  • Streptococcal Infections - microbiology
  • Streptococcal Infections - pathology
  • Streptococcal Infections - veterinary
  • Streptococcus suis
  • Streptococcus suis - pathogenicity
  • Swine
  • Swine Diseases - microbiology
  • Swine Diseases - pathology
  • Swine Diseases - virology
  • Viremia - veterinary
  • Virulence
  • Virulence (Microbiology)
ispartof: Veterinary microbiology, 2017-05, Vol.203, p.6-17
description: •Both Asian HP-PRRSV isolates and US PRRSV isolates varied in virulence.•The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the virulence of the PRRSV strains evaluated.•Serum cytokine levels tended to be lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone.•Factors such as bacterial burden, age at the time of exposure, and stress play an important role in the outcome of infection with PRRSV. Epidemiologic data from Asian outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) suggest that disease severity was associated with both the virulence of the PRRSV isolates and secondary bacterial infections. Previous reports have indicated that U.S. isolates of PRRSV predispose to secondary bacterial infections as well, but the severity of disease that occurred in Asia in pigs infected with these HP-PRRSV strains has not been reported in the U.S. The objectives of this research were to compare the pathogenesis of Asian and U.S. PRRSV isolates with regard to their ability to cause disease and predispose to secondary bacterial infections in swine. To address these objectives groups of pigs were infected with 1 of 2 Asian HP-PRRSV strains (rJXwn06 or rSRV07) or 1 of 2 U.S. PRRSV strains (SDSU73 or VR-2332) alone or in combination with Streptococcus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, and Actinobacillus suis. Pigs infected with rJXwn06 exhibited the most severe clinical disease while the pigs infected with rSRV07 and SDSU73 exhibited moderate clinical disease, and pigs infected with VR-2332 exhibited minimal clinical signs. The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the clinical severity induced by the PRRSV strains evaluated. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum were often lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone indicating an alteration in the immune response in coinfected pigs. Combined our results demonstrate that severity of disease appears to be dependent on virulence of the PRRSV strain, and development of secondary bacterial infection.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0378-1135
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0378-1135
  • 1873-2542
url: Link


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titleComparison of Asian porcine high fever disease isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to United States isolates for their ability to cause disease and secondary bacterial infection in swine
creatorBrockmeier, Susan L ; Loving, Crystal L ; Palmer, Mitchel V ; Spear, Allyn ; Nicholson, Tracy L ; Faaberg, Kay S ; Lager, Kelly M
creatorcontribBrockmeier, Susan L ; Loving, Crystal L ; Palmer, Mitchel V ; Spear, Allyn ; Nicholson, Tracy L ; Faaberg, Kay S ; Lager, Kelly M
description•Both Asian HP-PRRSV isolates and US PRRSV isolates varied in virulence.•The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the virulence of the PRRSV strains evaluated.•Serum cytokine levels tended to be lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone.•Factors such as bacterial burden, age at the time of exposure, and stress play an important role in the outcome of infection with PRRSV. Epidemiologic data from Asian outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) suggest that disease severity was associated with both the virulence of the PRRSV isolates and secondary bacterial infections. Previous reports have indicated that U.S. isolates of PRRSV predispose to secondary bacterial infections as well, but the severity of disease that occurred in Asia in pigs infected with these HP-PRRSV strains has not been reported in the U.S. The objectives of this research were to compare the pathogenesis of Asian and U.S. PRRSV isolates with regard to their ability to cause disease and predispose to secondary bacterial infections in swine. To address these objectives groups of pigs were infected with 1 of 2 Asian HP-PRRSV strains (rJXwn06 or rSRV07) or 1 of 2 U.S. PRRSV strains (SDSU73 or VR-2332) alone or in combination with Streptococcus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, and Actinobacillus suis. Pigs infected with rJXwn06 exhibited the most severe clinical disease while the pigs infected with rSRV07 and SDSU73 exhibited moderate clinical disease, and pigs infected with VR-2332 exhibited minimal clinical signs. The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the clinical severity induced by the PRRSV strains evaluated. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum were often lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone indicating an alteration in the immune response in coinfected pigs. Combined our results demonstrate that severity of disease appears to be dependent on virulence of the PRRSV strain, and development of secondary bacterial infection.
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languageeng
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subjectActinobacillus suis ; Animals ; Bacterial pneumonia ; Coinfection - veterinary ; Comorbidity ; Comparative analysis ; Development and progression ; Disease Susceptibility - veterinary ; Female ; Haemophilus Infections - microbiology ; Haemophilus Infections - pathology ; Haemophilus Infections - veterinary ; Haemophilus parasuis ; Haemophilus parasuis - pathogenicity ; Highly pathogenic PRRSV ; Lung - microbiology ; Lung - pathology ; Pathogenesis ; Pneumonia ; Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome ; Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - pathology ; Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - virology ; Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus ; Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus - pathogenicity ; Porcine respiratory disease complex ; PRDC ; PRRSV ; Secondary bacterial infection ; Streptococcal Infections - microbiology ; Streptococcal Infections - pathology ; Streptococcal Infections - veterinary ; Streptococcus suis ; Streptococcus suis - pathogenicity ; Swine ; Swine Diseases - microbiology ; Swine Diseases - pathology ; Swine Diseases - virology ; Viremia - veterinary ; Virulence ; Virulence (Microbiology)
ispartofVeterinary microbiology, 2017-05, Vol.203, p.6-17
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1Loving, Crystal L
2Palmer, Mitchel V
3Spear, Allyn
4Nicholson, Tracy L
5Faaberg, Kay S
6Lager, Kelly M
title
0Comparison of Asian porcine high fever disease isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to United States isolates for their ability to cause disease and secondary bacterial infection in swine
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description•Both Asian HP-PRRSV isolates and US PRRSV isolates varied in virulence.•The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the virulence of the PRRSV strains evaluated.•Serum cytokine levels tended to be lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone.•Factors such as bacterial burden, age at the time of exposure, and stress play an important role in the outcome of infection with PRRSV. Epidemiologic data from Asian outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) suggest that disease severity was associated with both the virulence of the PRRSV isolates and secondary bacterial infections. Previous reports have indicated that U.S. isolates of PRRSV predispose to secondary bacterial infections as well, but the severity of disease that occurred in Asia in pigs infected with these HP-PRRSV strains has not been reported in the U.S. The objectives of this research were to compare the pathogenesis of Asian and U.S. PRRSV isolates with regard to their ability to cause disease and predispose to secondary bacterial infections in swine. To address these objectives groups of pigs were infected with 1 of 2 Asian HP-PRRSV strains (rJXwn06 or rSRV07) or 1 of 2 U.S. PRRSV strains (SDSU73 or VR-2332) alone or in combination with Streptococcus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, and Actinobacillus suis. Pigs infected with rJXwn06 exhibited the most severe clinical disease while the pigs infected with rSRV07 and SDSU73 exhibited moderate clinical disease, and pigs infected with VR-2332 exhibited minimal clinical signs. The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the clinical severity induced by the PRRSV strains evaluated. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum were often lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone indicating an alteration in the immune response in coinfected pigs. Combined our results demonstrate that severity of disease appears to be dependent on virulence of the PRRSV strain, and development of secondary bacterial infection.
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0Actinobacillus suis
1Animals
2Bacterial pneumonia
3Coinfection - veterinary
4Comorbidity
5Comparative analysis
6Development and progression
7Disease Susceptibility - veterinary
8Female
9Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
10Haemophilus Infections - pathology
11Haemophilus Infections - veterinary
12Haemophilus parasuis
13Haemophilus parasuis - pathogenicity
14Highly pathogenic PRRSV
15Lung - microbiology
16Lung - pathology
17Pathogenesis
18Pneumonia
19Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome
20Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - pathology
21Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - virology
22Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus
23Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus - pathogenicity
24Porcine respiratory disease complex
25PRDC
26PRRSV
27Secondary bacterial infection
28Streptococcal Infections - microbiology
29Streptococcal Infections - pathology
30Streptococcal Infections - veterinary
31Streptococcus suis
32Streptococcus suis - pathogenicity
33Swine
34Swine Diseases - microbiology
35Swine Diseases - pathology
36Swine Diseases - virology
37Viremia - veterinary
38Virulence
39Virulence (Microbiology)
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2Palmer, Mitchel V
3Spear, Allyn
4Nicholson, Tracy L
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titleComparison of Asian porcine high fever disease isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to United States isolates for their ability to cause disease and secondary bacterial infection in swine
authorBrockmeier, Susan L ; Loving, Crystal L ; Palmer, Mitchel V ; Spear, Allyn ; Nicholson, Tracy L ; Faaberg, Kay S ; Lager, Kelly M
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0Actinobacillus suis
1Animals
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4Comorbidity
5Comparative analysis
6Development and progression
7Disease Susceptibility - veterinary
8Female
9Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
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18Pneumonia
19Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome
20Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - pathology
21Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - virology
22Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus
23Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus - pathogenicity
24Porcine respiratory disease complex
25PRDC
26PRRSV
27Secondary bacterial infection
28Streptococcal Infections - microbiology
29Streptococcal Infections - pathology
30Streptococcal Infections - veterinary
31Streptococcus suis
32Streptococcus suis - pathogenicity
33Swine
34Swine Diseases - microbiology
35Swine Diseases - pathology
36Swine Diseases - virology
37Viremia - veterinary
38Virulence
39Virulence (Microbiology)
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atitleComparison of Asian porcine high fever disease isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to United States isolates for their ability to cause disease and secondary bacterial infection in swine
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date2017-05
risdate2017
volume203
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issn0378-1135
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abstract•Both Asian HP-PRRSV isolates and US PRRSV isolates varied in virulence.•The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the virulence of the PRRSV strains evaluated.•Serum cytokine levels tended to be lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone.•Factors such as bacterial burden, age at the time of exposure, and stress play an important role in the outcome of infection with PRRSV. Epidemiologic data from Asian outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) suggest that disease severity was associated with both the virulence of the PRRSV isolates and secondary bacterial infections. Previous reports have indicated that U.S. isolates of PRRSV predispose to secondary bacterial infections as well, but the severity of disease that occurred in Asia in pigs infected with these HP-PRRSV strains has not been reported in the U.S. The objectives of this research were to compare the pathogenesis of Asian and U.S. PRRSV isolates with regard to their ability to cause disease and predispose to secondary bacterial infections in swine. To address these objectives groups of pigs were infected with 1 of 2 Asian HP-PRRSV strains (rJXwn06 or rSRV07) or 1 of 2 U.S. PRRSV strains (SDSU73 or VR-2332) alone or in combination with Streptococcus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, and Actinobacillus suis. Pigs infected with rJXwn06 exhibited the most severe clinical disease while the pigs infected with rSRV07 and SDSU73 exhibited moderate clinical disease, and pigs infected with VR-2332 exhibited minimal clinical signs. The frequency of secondary bacterial pneumonia was associated with the clinical severity induced by the PRRSV strains evaluated. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum were often lower for pigs coinfected with virus and bacteria compared to pigs infected with PRRSV alone indicating an alteration in the immune response in coinfected pigs. Combined our results demonstrate that severity of disease appears to be dependent on virulence of the PRRSV strain, and development of secondary bacterial infection.
copNetherlands
pubElsevier B.V
pmid28619168
doi10.1016/j.vetmic.2017.02.003