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Look at That! Video Chat and Joint Visual Attention Development among Babies and Toddlers

Although many relatives use video chat to keep in touch with toddlers, key features of adult-toddler interaction like joint visual attention (JVA) may be compromised in this context. In this study, 25 families with a child between 6 and 24 months were observed using video chat at home with geographi... Full description

Journal Title: Child Development 2018, Vol.89(1), p.27
Main Author: Mcclure, Elisabeth R
Other Authors: Chentsova-Dutton, Yulia E , Holochwost, Steven J , Parrott, W. G , Barr, Rachel
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0009-3920 ; E-ISSN: 1467-8624 ; DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12833
Link: http://eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=EJ1166198
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recordid: eric_sEJ1166198
title: Look at That! Video Chat and Joint Visual Attention Development among Babies and Toddlers
format: Article
creator:
  • Mcclure, Elisabeth R
  • Chentsova-Dutton, Yulia E
  • Holochwost, Steven J
  • Parrott, W. G
  • Barr, Rachel
subjects:
  • Infants
  • Toddlers
  • Child Development
  • Social Development
  • Adolescent Development
  • Videoconferencing
  • Grandparents
  • Correlation
  • Attention Control
  • Computer Mediated Communication
  • Age Differences
  • Medicine
  • Social Welfare & Social Work
  • Sociology & Social History
  • Psychology
ispartof: Child Development, 2018, Vol.89(1), p.27
description: Although many relatives use video chat to keep in touch with toddlers, key features of adult-toddler interaction like joint visual attention (JVA) may be compromised in this context. In this study, 25 families with a child between 6 and 24 months were observed using video chat at home with geographically separated grandparents. We define two types of screen-mediated JVA (across- and within-screen) and report age-related increases in the babies' across-screen JVA initiations, and that family JVA usage was positively related to babies' overall attention during video calls. Babies today are immersed in a digital world where formative relationships are often mediated by a screen. Implications for both infant social development and developmental research are discussed.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0009-3920 ; E-ISSN: 1467-8624 ; DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12833
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0009-3920
  • 00093920
  • 1467-8624
  • 14678624
url: Link


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titleLook at That! Video Chat and Joint Visual Attention Development among Babies and Toddlers
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subjectInfants ; Toddlers ; Child Development ; Social Development ; Adolescent Development ; Videoconferencing ; Grandparents ; Correlation ; Attention Control ; Computer Mediated Communication ; Age Differences ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work ; Sociology & Social History ; Psychology
descriptionAlthough many relatives use video chat to keep in touch with toddlers, key features of adult-toddler interaction like joint visual attention (JVA) may be compromised in this context. In this study, 25 families with a child between 6 and 24 months were observed using video chat at home with geographically separated grandparents. We define two types of screen-mediated JVA (across- and within-screen) and report age-related increases in the babies' across-screen JVA initiations, and that family JVA usage was positively related to babies' overall attention during video calls. Babies today are immersed in a digital world where formative relationships are often mediated by a screen. Implications for both infant social development and developmental research are discussed.
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Although many relatives use video chat to keep in touch with toddlers, key features of adult-toddler interaction like joint visual attention (JVA) may be compromised in this context. In this study, 25 families with a child between 6 and 24 months were observed using video chat at home with geographically separated grandparents. We define two types of screen-mediated JVA (across- and within-screen) and report age-related increases in the babies' across-screen JVA initiations, and that family JVA usage was positively related to babies' overall attention during video calls. Babies today are immersed in a digital world where formative relationships are often mediated by a screen. Implications for both infant social development and developmental research are discussed.

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Although many relatives use video chat to keep in touch with toddlers, key features of adult-toddler interaction like joint visual attention (JVA) may be compromised in this context. In this study, 25 families with a child between 6 and 24 months were observed using video chat at home with geographically separated grandparents. We define two types of screen-mediated JVA (across- and within-screen) and report age-related increases in the babies' across-screen JVA initiations, and that family JVA usage was positively related to babies' overall attention during video calls. Babies today are immersed in a digital world where formative relationships are often mediated by a screen. Implications for both infant social development and developmental research are discussed.

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