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Developmental Effects of Incentives on Response Inhibition

Inhibitory control and incentive processes underlie decision making, yet few studies have explicitly examined their interaction across development. Here, the effects of potential rewards and losses on inhibitory control in 64 adolescents (13- to 17-year-olds) and 42 young adults (18- to 29-year-olds... Full description

Journal Title: Child Development 2012, Vol.83(4), p.1262
Main Author: Geier, Charles F
Other Authors: Luna, Beatriz
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0009-3920 ; E-ISSN: 1467-8624 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01771.x
Link: http://eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=EJ991703
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recordid: eric_sEJ991703
title: Developmental Effects of Incentives on Response Inhibition
format: Article
creator:
  • Geier, Charles F
  • Luna, Beatriz
subjects:
  • Adolescents
  • Inhibition
  • Rewards
  • Young Adults
  • Metric System
  • Responses
  • Self Control
  • Decision Making
  • Age Differences
  • Motivation
  • Error Patterns
  • Eye Movements
  • Incentives
  • Visual Stimuli
  • Medicine
  • Social Welfare & Social Work
  • Sociology & Social History
  • Psychology
ispartof: Child Development, 2012, Vol.83(4), p.1262
description: Inhibitory control and incentive processes underlie decision making, yet few studies have explicitly examined their interaction across development. Here, the effects of potential rewards and losses on inhibitory control in 64 adolescents (13- to 17-year-olds) and 42 young adults (18- to 29-year-olds) were examined using an incentivized antisaccade task. Notably, measures were implemented to minimize age-related differences in reward valuation and potentially confounding motivation effects. Incentives affected antisaccade metrics differently across the age groups. Younger adolescents generated more errors than adults on reward trials, but all groups performed well on loss trials. Adolescent saccade latencies also differed from adults across the range of reward trials. Overall, results suggest persistent immaturities in the integration of reward and inhibitory control processes across adolescence. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0009-3920 ; E-ISSN: 1467-8624 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01771.x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0009-3920
  • 00093920
  • 1467-8624
  • 14678624
url: Link


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subjectAdolescents ; Inhibition ; Rewards ; Young Adults ; Metric System ; Responses ; Self Control ; Decision Making ; Age Differences ; Motivation ; Error Patterns ; Eye Movements ; Incentives ; Visual Stimuli ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work ; Sociology & Social History ; Psychology
descriptionInhibitory control and incentive processes underlie decision making, yet few studies have explicitly examined their interaction across development. Here, the effects of potential rewards and losses on inhibitory control in 64 adolescents (13- to 17-year-olds) and 42 young adults (18- to 29-year-olds) were examined using an incentivized antisaccade task. Notably, measures were implemented to minimize age-related differences in reward valuation and potentially confounding motivation effects. Incentives affected antisaccade metrics differently across the age groups. Younger adolescents generated more errors than adults on reward trials, but all groups performed well on loss trials. Adolescent saccade latencies also differed from adults across the range of reward trials. Overall, results suggest persistent immaturities in the integration of reward and inhibitory control processes across adolescence. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)
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Inhibitory control and incentive processes underlie decision making, yet few studies have explicitly examined their interaction across development. Here, the effects of potential rewards and losses on inhibitory control in 64 adolescents (13- to 17-year-olds) and 42 young adults (18- to 29-year-olds) were examined using an incentivized antisaccade task. Notably, measures were implemented to minimize age-related differences in reward valuation and potentially confounding motivation effects. Incentives affected antisaccade metrics differently across the age groups. Younger adolescents generated more errors than adults on reward trials, but all groups performed well on loss trials. Adolescent saccade latencies also differed from adults across the range of reward trials. Overall, results suggest persistent immaturities in the integration of reward and inhibitory control processes across adolescence. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)

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