schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Why do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective

Maximal weight loss observed in low-calorie diet (LCD) studies tends to be small, and the mechanisms leading to this low treatment efficacy have not been clarified. Less-than-expected weight loss with LCDs can arise from an increase in fractional energy absorption (FEA), adaptations in energy expend... Full description

Journal Title: American journal of clinical nutrition 2007, Vol.85(2), pp.346-354
Main Author: Heymsfield , Steven B.
Other Authors: Harp , Joyce B. , Reitman , Marc L. , Beetsch , Joel W. , Schoeller , Dale A. , Erondu , Ngozi , Pietrobelli , Angelo
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-9165
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: faoagrisUS201300745363
title: Why do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
format: Article
creator:
  • Heymsfield , Steven B.
  • Harp , Joyce B.
  • Reitman , Marc L.
  • Beetsch , Joel W.
  • Schoeller , Dale A.
  • Erondu , Ngozi
  • Pietrobelli , Angelo
subjects:
  • Patient Compliance
  • Weight Loss
  • Obesity
  • Human Nutrition
  • Humans
  • Energy Expenditure
  • Isotope Labeling
  • Low Calorie Diet
  • Literature Reviews
ispartof: American journal of clinical nutrition, 2007, Vol.85(2), pp.346-354
description: Maximal weight loss observed in low-calorie diet (LCD) studies tends to be small, and the mechanisms leading to this low treatment efficacy have not been clarified. Less-than-expected weight loss with LCDs can arise from an increase in fractional energy absorption (FEA), adaptations in energy expenditure, or incomplete patient diet adherence. We systematically reviewed studies of FEA and total energy expenditure (TEE) in obese patients undergoing weight loss with LCDs and in patients with reduced obesity (RO), respectively. This information was used to support an energy balance model that was then applied to examine patient adherence to prescribed LCD treatment programs. In the limited available literature, FEA was unchanged from baseline in short-term (=26 wk) studies were found. Review of doubly labeled water and respiratory chamber studies identified 10 reports of TEE in RO patients (n = 150) with long-term weight loss. These patients, who were weight stable, had a TEE almost identical to measured or predicted values in never-obese subjects (weighted mean difference: 1.3%; range: -1.7-8.5%). Modeling of energy balance, as supported by reviewed FEA and TEE studies, suggests that obese subjects participating in LCD programs have a weight loss less than half of that predicted. The small maximal weight loss observed with LCD treatments thus is likely not due to gastrointestinal adaptations but may be attributed, by deduction, to difficulties with patient adherence or, to a lesser degree, to metabolic adaptations induced by negative energy balance that are not captured by the current models. ; Includes references ; p. 346-354.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00029165
  • 0002-9165
url: Link


@attributes
ID791887109
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidUS201300745363
sourceidfaoagris
recordidTN_faoagrisUS201300745363
sourcesystemPC
pqid231931658
galeid159920090
display
typearticle
titleWhy do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
creatorHeymsfield , Steven B. ; Harp , Joyce B. ; Reitman , Marc L. ; Beetsch , Joel W. ; Schoeller , Dale A. ; Erondu , Ngozi ; Pietrobelli , Angelo
ispartofAmerican journal of clinical nutrition, 2007, Vol.85(2), pp.346-354
identifierISSN: 0002-9165
subjectPatient Compliance ; Weight Loss ; Obesity ; Human Nutrition ; Humans ; Energy Expenditure ; Isotope Labeling ; Low Calorie Diet ; Literature Reviews
descriptionMaximal weight loss observed in low-calorie diet (LCD) studies tends to be small, and the mechanisms leading to this low treatment efficacy have not been clarified. Less-than-expected weight loss with LCDs can arise from an increase in fractional energy absorption (FEA), adaptations in energy expenditure, or incomplete patient diet adherence. We systematically reviewed studies of FEA and total energy expenditure (TEE) in obese patients undergoing weight loss with LCDs and in patients with reduced obesity (RO), respectively. This information was used to support an energy balance model that was then applied to examine patient adherence to prescribed LCD treatment programs. In the limited available literature, FEA was unchanged from baseline in short-term (=26 wk) studies were found. Review of doubly labeled water and respiratory chamber studies identified 10 reports of TEE in RO patients (n = 150) with long-term weight loss. These patients, who were weight stable, had a TEE almost identical to measured or predicted values in never-obese subjects (weighted mean difference: 1.3%; range: -1.7-8.5%). Modeling of energy balance, as supported by reviewed FEA and TEE studies, suggests that obese subjects participating in LCD programs have a weight loss less than half of that predicted. The small maximal weight loss observed with LCD treatments thus is likely not due to gastrointestinal adaptations but may be attributed, by deduction, to difficulties with patient adherence or, to a lesser degree, to metabolic adaptations induced by negative energy balance that are not captured by the current models. ; Includes references ; p. 346-354.
languageeng
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://www.ajcn.org/contents-by-date.0.shtml$$EView_full_text_(authentication_may_be_required)
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Heymsfield , Steven B.
1Harp , Joyce B.
2Reitman , Marc L.
3Beetsch , Joel W.
4Schoeller , Dale A.
5Erondu , Ngozi
6Pietrobelli , Angelo
titleWhy do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
descriptionMaximal weight loss observed in low-calorie diet (LCD) studies tends to be small, and the mechanisms leading to this low treatment efficacy have not been clarified. Less-than-expected weight loss with LCDs can arise from an increase in fractional energy absorption (FEA), adaptations in energy expenditure, or incomplete patient diet adherence. We systematically reviewed studies of FEA and total energy expenditure (TEE) in obese patients undergoing weight loss with LCDs and in patients with reduced obesity (RO), respectively. This information was used to support an energy balance model that was then applied to examine patient adherence to prescribed LCD treatment programs. In the limited available literature, FEA was unchanged from baseline in short-term (=26 wk) studies were found. Review of doubly labeled water and respiratory chamber studies identified 10 reports of TEE in RO patients (n = 150) with long-term weight loss. These patients, who were weight stable, had a TEE almost identical to measured or predicted values in never-obese subjects (weighted mean difference: 1.3%; range: -1.7-8.5%). Modeling of energy balance, as supported by reviewed FEA and TEE studies, suggests that obese subjects participating in LCD programs have a weight loss less than half of that predicted. The small maximal weight loss observed with LCD treatments thus is likely not due to gastrointestinal adaptations but may be attributed, by deduction, to difficulties with patient adherence or, to a lesser degree, to metabolic adaptations induced by negative energy balance that are not captured by the current models. ; Includes references ; p. 346-354.
subject
0Patient Compliance
1Weight Loss
2Obesity
3Human Nutrition
4Humans
5Energy Expenditure
6Isotope Labeling
7Low Calorie Diet
8Literature Reviews
general
0English
1AGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)
sourceidfaoagris
recordidfaoagrisUS201300745363
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2007
addtitleAmerican journal of clinical nutrition
searchscope
0faoagris
1faoagris_lr
scope
0faoagris
1faoagris_lr
alttitleWhy do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
issn
000029165
10002-9165
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[galeid, eissn, pqid, doi]
sort
titleWhy do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
authorHeymsfield , Steven B. ; Harp , Joyce B. ; Reitman , Marc L. ; Beetsch , Joel W. ; Schoeller , Dale A. ; Erondu , Ngozi ; Pietrobelli , Angelo
creationdate20070000
facets
frbrgroupid2680661863239057447
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2007
topic
0Patient Compliance
1Weight Loss
2Obesity
3Human Nutrition
4Humans
5Energy Expenditure
6Isotope Labeling
7Low Calorie Diet
8Literature Reviews
collectionAGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Heymsfield , Steven B.
1Harp , Joyce B.
2Reitman , Marc L.
3Beetsch , Joel W.
4Schoeller , Dale A.
5Erondu , Ngozi
6Pietrobelli , Angelo
jtitleAmerican journal of clinical nutrition
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Heymsfield, Steven B.
1Harp, Joyce B.
2Reitman, Marc L.
3Beetsch, Joel W.
4Schoeller, Dale A.
5Erondu, Ngozi
6Pietrobelli, Angelo
atitleWhy do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
jtitleAmerican journal of clinical nutrition
addtitleWhy do obese patients not lose more weight when treated with low-calorie diets? A mechanistic perspective
date2007
risdate2007
volume85
issue2
spage346
epage354
pages346-354
issn0002-9165
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
notesIncludes references
abstractMaximal weight loss observed in low-calorie diet (LCD) studies tends to be small, and the mechanisms leading to this low treatment efficacy have not been clarified. Less-than-expected weight loss with LCDs can arise from an increase in fractional energy absorption (FEA), adaptations in energy expenditure, or incomplete patient diet adherence. We systematically reviewed studies of FEA and total energy expenditure (TEE) in obese patients undergoing weight loss with LCDs and in patients with reduced obesity (RO), respectively. This information was used to support an energy balance model that was then applied to examine patient adherence to prescribed LCD treatment programs. In the limited available literature, FEA was unchanged from baseline in short-term (=26 wk) studies were found. Review of doubly labeled water and respiratory chamber studies identified 10 reports of TEE in RO patients (n = 150) with long-term weight loss. These patients, who were weight stable, had a TEE almost identical to measured or predicted values in never-obese subjects (weighted mean difference: 1.3%; range: -1.7-8.5%). Modeling of energy balance, as supported by reviewed FEA and TEE studies, suggests that obese subjects participating in LCD programs have a weight loss less than half of that predicted. The small maximal weight loss observed with LCD treatments thus is likely not due to gastrointestinal adaptations but may be attributed, by deduction, to difficulties with patient adherence or, to a lesser degree, to metabolic adaptations induced by negative energy balance that are not captured by the current models.
pubAmerican Society for Nutrition
doi10.1093/ajcn/85.2.346
eissn19383207