schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

False-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet

A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ket... Full description

Journal Title: International journal of obesity : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 2007, Vol.31(3), pp.559-561
Main Author: Jones , A.W.
Other Authors: Rossner , S.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
ID: ISSN: 0307-0565
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: faoagrisUS201300779667
title: False-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
format: Article
creator:
  • Jones , A.W.
  • Rossner , S.
subjects:
  • Automobiles
  • Acetone
  • 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid
  • Methanol
  • Case Studies
  • Ethanol
  • Very Low Calorie Diet
  • Adults
  • Alcohols
  • Ketonemia
  • Men
  • Isopropyl Alcohol
  • Ketones
  • Ignition Interlock Device
  • Acetolactate
  • Breath-Alcohol Test
  • False Positives
ispartof: International journal of obesity : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 2007, Vol.31(3), pp.559-561
description: A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. ; Includes references ; p. 559-561.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0307-0565
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 03070565
  • 0307-0565
url: Link


@attributes
ID638585685
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidUS201300779667
sourceidfaoagris
recordidTN_faoagrisUS201300779667
sourcesystemPC
pqid70211461
galeid188435165
display
typearticle
titleFalse-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
creatorJones , A.W. ; Rossner , S.
ispartofInternational journal of obesity : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 2007, Vol.31(3), pp.559-561
identifierISSN: 0307-0565
subjectAutomobiles ; Acetone ; 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid ; Methanol ; Case Studies ; Ethanol ; Very Low Calorie Diet ; Adults ; Alcohols ; Ketonemia ; Men ; Isopropyl Alcohol ; Ketones ; Ignition Interlock Device ; Acetolactate ; Breath-Alcohol Test ; False Positives
descriptionA 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. ; Includes references ; p. 559-561.
languageeng
source
version9
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://www.nature.com/ijo/$$EView_full_text_(authentication_may_be_required)
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Jones , A.W.
1Rossner , S.
titleFalse-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
descriptionA 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. ; Includes references ; p. 559-561.
subject
0Automobiles
1Acetone
23-Hydroxybutyric Acid
3Methanol
4Case Studies
5Ethanol
6Very Low Calorie Diet
7Adults
8Alcohols
9Ketonemia
10Men
11Isopropyl Alcohol
12Ketones
13Ignition Interlock Device
14Acetolactate
15Breath-Alcohol Test
16False Positives
general
0English
1AGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)
sourceidfaoagris
recordidfaoagrisUS201300779667
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2007
addtitleInternational journal of obesity : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
searchscope
0faoagris
1faoagris_lr
scope
0faoagris
1faoagris_lr
alttitleFalse-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
issn
003070565
10307-0565
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[eissn, galeid, pqid, doi]
sort
titleFalse-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
authorJones , A.W. ; Rossner , S.
creationdate20070000
facets
frbrgroupid-741236880948995126
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2007
topic
0Automobiles
1Acetone
23-Hydroxybutyric Acid
3Methanol
4Case Studies
5Ethanol
6Very Low Calorie Diet
7Adults
8Alcohols
9Ketonemia
10Men
11Isopropyl Alcohol
12Ketones
13Ignition Interlock Device
14Acetolactate
15Breath-Alcohol Test
16False Positives
collectionAGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Jones , A.W.
1Rossner , S.
jtitleInternational journal of obesity : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Jones, A.W.
1Rossner, S.
atitleFalse-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
jtitleInternational journal of obesity : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
addtitleFalse-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet
date2007
risdate2007
volume31
issue3
spage559
epage561
pages559-561
issn0307-0565
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
notesIncludes references
abstractA 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests.
doi10.1038/sj.ijo.0803444
eissn14765497