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Effects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial

BACKGROUND:A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss. OBJECTIVE:We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivor... Full description

Journal Title: American journal of clinical nutrition AJN 2007, Vol.86(3), pp.588-596
Main Author: Burke , Lora E.
Other Authors: Hudson , Alana G. , Warziski , Melanie T. , Styn , Mindi A. , Music , Edvin , Elci , Okan U. , Sereika , Susan M.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-9165
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recordid: faoagrisUS201300804231
title: Effects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial
format: Article
creator:
  • Burke , Lora E.
  • Hudson , Alana G.
  • Warziski , Melanie T.
  • Styn , Mindi A.
  • Music , Edvin
  • Elci , Okan U.
  • Sereika , Susan M.
subjects:
  • Food Choices
  • Obesity
  • Health Status
  • Insulin Resistance
  • Biochemical Mechanisms
  • Cholesterol
  • Low Calorie Diet
  • Body Weight Changes
  • Energy Intake
  • Nutrient Intake
  • Overweight
  • Adults
  • Nutritional Intervention
  • Randomized Clinical Trials
  • Vegetarian Diet
  • Triacylglycerols
ispartof: American journal of clinical nutrition AJN, 2007, Vol.86(3), pp.588-596
description: BACKGROUND:A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss. OBJECTIVE:We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivorous diet (STD-D) on changes in weight, total cholesterol, ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (LDL:HDL cholesterol), triacylglycerols, insulin resistance, and macronutrient intake during an 18-mo study. DESIGN:This was a randomized clinical trial of 176 overweight and obese adults who were recruited and randomly assigned first to 1 of 2 preference conditions (yes or no). If assigned to Preference-No, they were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 diet conditions (STD-D or LOV-D). If assigned to Preference-Yes, they were assigned to the diet they indicated as preferred at screening. The 12-mo intervention was followed by a 6-mo maintenance phase. RESULTS:Participants were mainly women (86.9%) and white (70.5%); 75% completed the 18-mo study. A significant interaction between preference and dietary treatment was not observed for any of the outcome variables. However, participants in the Preference-No groups significantly decreased their triacylglycerols (P = 0.04). The only effect observed for diet was a borderline significant decrease in LDL:HDL cholesterol for the LOV-D group (P = 0.06). Within the LOV-D groups, those who were 100% adherent to the LOV-D had significant and marginally significant reductions in monounsaturated fat (P = 0.02) and total fat (P = 0.05) intakes at 18 mo. CONCLUSIONS:Our findings suggest that neither prescribing a vegetarian diet nor allowing persons to choose their preferred diet had a significant effect on outcome measures. However, all participants had a significant reduction in total energy and fat intakes and an increase in energy expenditure, which was reflected in reduced body weight. This clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00330629. ; Includes references ; p. 588-596.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00029165
  • 0002-9165
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titleEffects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial
creatorBurke , Lora E. ; Hudson , Alana G. ; Warziski , Melanie T. ; Styn , Mindi A. ; Music , Edvin ; Elci , Okan U. ; Sereika , Susan M.
ispartofAmerican journal of clinical nutrition AJN, 2007, Vol.86(3), pp.588-596
identifierISSN: 0002-9165
subjectFood Choices ; Obesity ; Health Status ; Insulin Resistance ; Biochemical Mechanisms ; Cholesterol ; Low Calorie Diet ; Body Weight Changes ; Energy Intake ; Nutrient Intake ; Overweight ; Adults ; Nutritional Intervention ; Randomized Clinical Trials ; Vegetarian Diet ; Triacylglycerols
descriptionBACKGROUND:A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss. OBJECTIVE:We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivorous diet (STD-D) on changes in weight, total cholesterol, ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (LDL:HDL cholesterol), triacylglycerols, insulin resistance, and macronutrient intake during an 18-mo study. DESIGN:This was a randomized clinical trial of 176 overweight and obese adults who were recruited and randomly assigned first to 1 of 2 preference conditions (yes or no). If assigned to Preference-No, they were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 diet conditions (STD-D or LOV-D). If assigned to Preference-Yes, they were assigned to the diet they indicated as preferred at screening. The 12-mo intervention was followed by a 6-mo maintenance phase. RESULTS:Participants were mainly women (86.9%) and white (70.5%); 75% completed the 18-mo study. A significant interaction between preference and dietary treatment was not observed for any of the outcome variables. However, participants in the Preference-No groups significantly decreased their triacylglycerols (P = 0.04). The only effect observed for diet was a borderline significant decrease in LDL:HDL cholesterol for the LOV-D group (P = 0.06). Within the LOV-D groups, those who were 100% adherent to the LOV-D had significant and marginally significant reductions in monounsaturated fat (P = 0.02) and total fat (P = 0.05) intakes at 18 mo. CONCLUSIONS:Our findings suggest that neither prescribing a vegetarian diet nor allowing persons to choose their preferred diet had a significant effect on outcome measures. However, all participants had a significant reduction in total energy and fat intakes and an increase in energy expenditure, which was reflected in reduced body weight. This clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00330629. ; Includes references ; p. 588-596.
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titleEffects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial
descriptionBACKGROUND:A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss. OBJECTIVE:We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivorous diet (STD-D) on changes in weight, total cholesterol, ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (LDL:HDL cholesterol), triacylglycerols, insulin resistance, and macronutrient intake during an 18-mo study. DESIGN:This was a randomized clinical trial of 176 overweight and obese adults who were recruited and randomly assigned first to 1 of 2 preference conditions (yes or no). If assigned to Preference-No, they were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 diet conditions (STD-D or LOV-D). If assigned to Preference-Yes, they were assigned to the diet they indicated as preferred at screening. The 12-mo intervention was followed by a 6-mo maintenance phase. RESULTS:Participants were mainly women (86.9%) and white (70.5%); 75% completed the 18-mo study. A significant interaction between preference and dietary treatment was not observed for any of the outcome variables. However, participants in the Preference-No groups significantly decreased their triacylglycerols (P = 0.04). The only effect observed for diet was a borderline significant decrease in LDL:HDL cholesterol for the LOV-D group (P = 0.06). Within the LOV-D groups, those who were 100% adherent to the LOV-D had significant and marginally significant reductions in monounsaturated fat (P = 0.02) and total fat (P = 0.05) intakes at 18 mo. CONCLUSIONS:Our findings suggest that neither prescribing a vegetarian diet nor allowing persons to choose their preferred diet had a significant effect on outcome measures. However, all participants had a significant reduction in total energy and fat intakes and an increase in energy expenditure, which was reflected in reduced body weight. This clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00330629. ; Includes references ; p. 588-596.
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titleEffects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial
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7Body Weight Changes
8Energy Intake
9Nutrient Intake
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abstractBACKGROUND:A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss. OBJECTIVE:We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivorous diet (STD-D) on changes in weight, total cholesterol, ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (LDL:HDL cholesterol), triacylglycerols, insulin resistance, and macronutrient intake during an 18-mo study. DESIGN:This was a randomized clinical trial of 176 overweight and obese adults who were recruited and randomly assigned first to 1 of 2 preference conditions (yes or no). If assigned to Preference-No, they were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 diet conditions (STD-D or LOV-D). If assigned to Preference-Yes, they were assigned to the diet they indicated as preferred at screening. The 12-mo intervention was followed by a 6-mo maintenance phase. RESULTS:Participants were mainly women (86.9%) and white (70.5%); 75% completed the 18-mo study. A significant interaction between preference and dietary treatment was not observed for any of the outcome variables. However, participants in the Preference-No groups significantly decreased their triacylglycerols (P = 0.04). The only effect observed for diet was a borderline significant decrease in LDL:HDL cholesterol for the LOV-D group (P = 0.06). Within the LOV-D groups, those who were 100% adherent to the LOV-D had significant and marginally significant reductions in monounsaturated fat (P = 0.02) and total fat (P = 0.05) intakes at 18 mo. CONCLUSIONS:Our findings suggest that neither prescribing a vegetarian diet nor allowing persons to choose their preferred diet had a significant effect on outcome measures. However, all participants had a significant reduction in total energy and fat intakes and an increase in energy expenditure, which was reflected in reduced body weight. This clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00330629.
pubAmerican Society for Nutrition
doi10.1093/ajcn/86.3.588
eissn19383207
date2007-09-01