schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Lack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men

BACKGROUND: Prospective cohort studies in Japanese populations have shown an inverse association between dietary protein and stroke risk. However, this association has not been examined among any study populations of US men. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the relation between dietary protei... Full description

Journal Title: American journal of clinical nutrition AJN 2010, Vol.91(1), pp.39-45
Main Author: Preis , Sarah Rosner
Other Authors: Stampfer , Meir J. , Spiegelman , Donna , Willett , Walter C. , Rimm , Eric B.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
ID: ISSN: 0002-9165
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: faoagrisUS201301715037
title: Lack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
format: Article
creator:
  • Preis , Sarah Rosner
  • Stampfer , Meir J.
  • Spiegelman , Donna
  • Willett , Walter C.
  • Rimm , Eric B.
subjects:
  • Stroke
  • Middle-Aged Adults
  • Protein Intake
  • Food Frequency Questionnaires
  • Risk Assessment
  • Diet-Related Diseases
  • Men
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Dietary Protein
ispartof: American journal of clinical nutrition AJN, 2010, Vol.91(1), pp.39-45
description: BACKGROUND: Prospective cohort studies in Japanese populations have shown an inverse association between dietary protein and stroke risk. However, this association has not been examined among any study populations of US men. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the relation between dietary protein and risk of stroke in men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. DESIGN: A total of 43,960 men who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline were included in the analysis. Dietary protein (total, animal, and vegetable) was assessed with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire at 5 time points during the follow-up period of 1986-2004. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate multivariate relative risks and 95% CIs, which represented the effect of the substitution of protein for an equal percentage of energy from carbohydrate. RESULTS: During 18 y of follow-up there were 1057 incident stroke events (638 ischemic, 171 hemorrhagic, and 248 of unknown type). For total stroke, the relative risk for the top quintile of percentage energy from protein compared with the bottom was 1.14 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.43; P for linear trend: 0.43) for total protein, 1.11 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.41; P for linear trend: 0.52) for animal protein, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12; P for linear trend: 0.17) for vegetable protein. The results were similar when ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes were considered separately. CONCLUSION: In contrast to studies in Japanese populations, this study did not show a statistically significant association between total, animal, or vegetable protein and risk of stroke in this population of US men. ; Includes references ; p. 39-45.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00029165
  • 0002-9165
url: Link


@attributes
ID81476038
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidUS201301715037
sourceidfaoagris
recordidTN_faoagrisUS201301715037
sourcesystemOther
pqid734201949
galeid215719117
display
typearticle
titleLack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
creatorPreis , Sarah Rosner ; Stampfer , Meir J. ; Spiegelman , Donna ; Willett , Walter C. ; Rimm , Eric B.
ispartofAmerican journal of clinical nutrition AJN, 2010, Vol.91(1), pp.39-45
identifierISSN: 0002-9165
subjectStroke ; Middle-Aged Adults ; Protein Intake ; Food Frequency Questionnaires ; Risk Assessment ; Diet-Related Diseases ; Men ; Longitudinal Studies ; Dietary Protein
descriptionBACKGROUND: Prospective cohort studies in Japanese populations have shown an inverse association between dietary protein and stroke risk. However, this association has not been examined among any study populations of US men. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the relation between dietary protein and risk of stroke in men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. DESIGN: A total of 43,960 men who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline were included in the analysis. Dietary protein (total, animal, and vegetable) was assessed with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire at 5 time points during the follow-up period of 1986-2004. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate multivariate relative risks and 95% CIs, which represented the effect of the substitution of protein for an equal percentage of energy from carbohydrate. RESULTS: During 18 y of follow-up there were 1057 incident stroke events (638 ischemic, 171 hemorrhagic, and 248 of unknown type). For total stroke, the relative risk for the top quintile of percentage energy from protein compared with the bottom was 1.14 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.43; P for linear trend: 0.43) for total protein, 1.11 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.41; P for linear trend: 0.52) for animal protein, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12; P for linear trend: 0.17) for vegetable protein. The results were similar when ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes were considered separately. CONCLUSION: In contrast to studies in Japanese populations, this study did not show a statistically significant association between total, animal, or vegetable protein and risk of stroke in this population of US men. ; Includes references ; p. 39-45.
languageeng
source
coverageUnited States
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Preis , Sarah Rosner
1Stampfer , Meir J.
2Spiegelman , Donna
3Willett , Walter C.
4Rimm , Eric B.
titleLack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
descriptionBACKGROUND: Prospective cohort studies in Japanese populations have shown an inverse association between dietary protein and stroke risk. However, this association has not been examined among any study populations of US men. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the relation between dietary protein and risk of stroke in men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. DESIGN: A total of 43,960 men who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline were included in the analysis. Dietary protein (total, animal, and vegetable) was assessed with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire at 5 time points during the follow-up period of 1986-2004. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate multivariate relative risks and 95% CIs, which represented the effect of the substitution of protein for an equal percentage of energy from carbohydrate. RESULTS: During 18 y of follow-up there were 1057 incident stroke events (638 ischemic, 171 hemorrhagic, and 248 of unknown type). For total stroke, the relative risk for the top quintile of percentage energy from protein compared with the bottom was 1.14 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.43; P for linear trend: 0.43) for total protein, 1.11 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.41; P for linear trend: 0.52) for animal protein, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12; P for linear trend: 0.17) for vegetable protein. The results were similar when ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes were considered separately. CONCLUSION: In contrast to studies in Japanese populations, this study did not show a statistically significant association between total, animal, or vegetable protein and risk of stroke in this population of US men. ; Includes references ; p. 39-45.
subject
0Stroke
1Middle-Aged Adults
2Protein Intake
3Food Frequency Questionnaires
4Risk Assessment
5Diet-Related Diseases
6Men
7Longitudinal Studies
8Dietary Protein
general
0English
1AGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)
sourceidfaoagris
recordidfaoagrisUS201301715037
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2010
addtitleAmerican journal of clinical nutrition AJN
searchscope
0faoagris
1faoagris_sfx
scope
0faoagris
1faoagris_sfx
alttitleLack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
issn
000029165
10002-9165
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[date, pqid, eissn, doi, galeid]
sort
titleLack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
authorPreis , Sarah Rosner ; Stampfer , Meir J. ; Spiegelman , Donna ; Willett , Walter C. ; Rimm , Eric B.
creationdate20100000
facets
frbrgroupid7472989672171595017
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2010
topic
0Stroke
1Middle-Aged Adults
2Protein Intake
3Food Frequency Questionnaires
4Risk Assessment
5Diet-Related Diseases
6Men
7Longitudinal Studies
8Dietary Protein
collectionAGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Preis , Sarah Rosner
1Stampfer , Meir J.
2Spiegelman , Donna
3Willett , Walter C.
4Rimm , Eric B.
jtitleAmerican journal of clinical nutrition AJN
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Preis, Sarah Rosner
1Stampfer, Meir J.
2Spiegelman, Donna
3Willett, Walter C.
4Rimm, Eric B.
atitleLack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
jtitleAmerican journal of clinical nutrition AJN
addtitleLack of association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke among middle-aged men
risdate2010
volume91
issue1
spage39
epage45
pages39-45
issn0002-9165
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
notesIncludes references
abstractBACKGROUND: Prospective cohort studies in Japanese populations have shown an inverse association between dietary protein and stroke risk. However, this association has not been examined among any study populations of US men. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the relation between dietary protein and risk of stroke in men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. DESIGN: A total of 43,960 men who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline were included in the analysis. Dietary protein (total, animal, and vegetable) was assessed with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire at 5 time points during the follow-up period of 1986-2004. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate multivariate relative risks and 95% CIs, which represented the effect of the substitution of protein for an equal percentage of energy from carbohydrate. RESULTS: During 18 y of follow-up there were 1057 incident stroke events (638 ischemic, 171 hemorrhagic, and 248 of unknown type). For total stroke, the relative risk for the top quintile of percentage energy from protein compared with the bottom was 1.14 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.43; P for linear trend: 0.43) for total protein, 1.11 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.41; P for linear trend: 0.52) for animal protein, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12; P for linear trend: 0.17) for vegetable protein. The results were similar when ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes were considered separately. CONCLUSION: In contrast to studies in Japanese populations, this study did not show a statistically significant association between total, animal, or vegetable protein and risk of stroke in this population of US men.
pubAmerican Society for Clinical Nutrition
doi10.3945/ajcn.2009.28060
eissn19383207
date2010-01-01