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Accuracy of Stated Energy Contents of Reduced-Energy, Commercially Prepared Foods

The accuracy of stated energy contents of reduced-energy restaurant foods and frozen meals purchased from supermarkets was evaluated. Measured energy values of 29 quick-serve and sit-down restaurant foods averaged 18% more than stated values, and measured energy values of 10 frozen meals purchased f... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2010, Vol.110(1), pp.116-123
Main Author: Urban , Lorien E.
Other Authors: Dallal , Gerard E. , Robinson , Lisa M. , Ausman , Lynne M. , Saltzman , Edward , Roberts , Susan B.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-8223
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recordid: faoagrisUS201301719060
title: Accuracy of Stated Energy Contents of Reduced-Energy, Commercially Prepared Foods
format: Article
creator:
  • Urban , Lorien E.
  • Dallal , Gerard E.
  • Robinson , Lisa M.
  • Ausman , Lynne M.
  • Saltzman , Edward
  • Roberts , Susan B.
subjects:
  • Information Dissemination
  • Food Labeling
  • Prepared Foods
  • Restaurant Foods
  • Consumer Information
  • Ready-To-Cook Foods
  • Frozen Foods
  • Low Calorie Diet
  • Nutrition Information
  • Nutrient Content
  • Supermarkets
  • Energy Content
  • Nutrition Policy
  • Energy Intake
  • Daily Values
  • Retail Marketing
  • Accuracy
  • Restaurants
  • Food Energy Content
ispartof: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 2010, Vol.110(1), pp.116-123
description: The accuracy of stated energy contents of reduced-energy restaurant foods and frozen meals purchased from supermarkets was evaluated. Measured energy values of 29 quick-serve and sit-down restaurant foods averaged 18% more than stated values, and measured energy values of 10 frozen meals purchased from supermarkets averaged 8% more than originally stated. These differences substantially exceeded laboratory measurement error but did not achieve statistical significance due to considerable variability in the degree of underreporting. Some individual restaurant items contained up to 200% of stated values and, in addition, free side dishes increased provided energy to an average of 245% of stated values for the entrees they accompanied. These findings suggest that stated energy contents of reduced-energy meals obtained from restaurants and supermarkets are not consistently accurate, and in this study averaged more than measured values, especially when free side dishes were taken into account. If widespread, this phenomenon could hamper efforts to self-monitor energy intake to control weight, and could also reduce the potential benefit of recent policy initiatives to disseminate information on food energy content at the point of purchase. ; Includes references ; p. 116-123.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-8223
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00028223
  • 0002-8223
url: Link


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titleAccuracy of Stated Energy Contents of Reduced-Energy, Commercially Prepared Foods
creatorUrban , Lorien E. ; Dallal , Gerard E. ; Robinson , Lisa M. ; Ausman , Lynne M. ; Saltzman , Edward ; Roberts , Susan B.
ispartofJournal of the American Dietetic Association, 2010, Vol.110(1), pp.116-123
identifierISSN: 0002-8223
subjectInformation Dissemination ; Food Labeling ; Prepared Foods ; Restaurant Foods ; Consumer Information ; Ready-To-Cook Foods ; Frozen Foods ; Low Calorie Diet ; Nutrition Information ; Nutrient Content ; Supermarkets ; Energy Content ; Nutrition Policy ; Energy Intake ; Daily Values ; Retail Marketing ; Accuracy ; Restaurants ; Food Energy Content
descriptionThe accuracy of stated energy contents of reduced-energy restaurant foods and frozen meals purchased from supermarkets was evaluated. Measured energy values of 29 quick-serve and sit-down restaurant foods averaged 18% more than stated values, and measured energy values of 10 frozen meals purchased from supermarkets averaged 8% more than originally stated. These differences substantially exceeded laboratory measurement error but did not achieve statistical significance due to considerable variability in the degree of underreporting. Some individual restaurant items contained up to 200% of stated values and, in addition, free side dishes increased provided energy to an average of 245% of stated values for the entrees they accompanied. These findings suggest that stated energy contents of reduced-energy meals obtained from restaurants and supermarkets are not consistently accurate, and in this study averaged more than measured values, especially when free side dishes were taken into account. If widespread, this phenomenon could hamper efforts to self-monitor energy intake to control weight, and could also reduce the potential benefit of recent policy initiatives to disseminate information on food energy content at the point of purchase. ; Includes references ; p. 116-123.
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titleAccuracy of Stated Energy Contents of Reduced-Energy, Commercially Prepared Foods
descriptionThe accuracy of stated energy contents of reduced-energy restaurant foods and frozen meals purchased from supermarkets was evaluated. Measured energy values of 29 quick-serve and sit-down restaurant foods averaged 18% more than stated values, and measured energy values of 10 frozen meals purchased from supermarkets averaged 8% more than originally stated. These differences substantially exceeded laboratory measurement error but did not achieve statistical significance due to considerable variability in the degree of underreporting. Some individual restaurant items contained up to 200% of stated values and, in addition, free side dishes increased provided energy to an average of 245% of stated values for the entrees they accompanied. These findings suggest that stated energy contents of reduced-energy meals obtained from restaurants and supermarkets are not consistently accurate, and in this study averaged more than measured values, especially when free side dishes were taken into account. If widespread, this phenomenon could hamper efforts to self-monitor energy intake to control weight, and could also reduce the potential benefit of recent policy initiatives to disseminate information on food energy content at the point of purchase. ; Includes references ; p. 116-123.
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13Energy Intake
14Daily Values
15Retail Marketing
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17Restaurants
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abstractThe accuracy of stated energy contents of reduced-energy restaurant foods and frozen meals purchased from supermarkets was evaluated. Measured energy values of 29 quick-serve and sit-down restaurant foods averaged 18% more than stated values, and measured energy values of 10 frozen meals purchased from supermarkets averaged 8% more than originally stated. These differences substantially exceeded laboratory measurement error but did not achieve statistical significance due to considerable variability in the degree of underreporting. Some individual restaurant items contained up to 200% of stated values and, in addition, free side dishes increased provided energy to an average of 245% of stated values for the entrees they accompanied. These findings suggest that stated energy contents of reduced-energy meals obtained from restaurants and supermarkets are not consistently accurate, and in this study averaged more than measured values, especially when free side dishes were taken into account. If widespread, this phenomenon could hamper efforts to self-monitor energy intake to control weight, and could also reduce the potential benefit of recent policy initiatives to disseminate information on food energy content at the point of purchase.
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