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Herd behavior in a complex adaptive system

In order to survive, self-serving agents in various kinds of complex adaptive systems (CASs) must compete against others for sharing limited resources with biased or unbiased distribution by conducting strategic behaviors. This competition can globally result in the balance of resource allocation. A... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2011, Vol.108(37), pp.15058-15063
Main Author: Zhao , Li
Other Authors: Yang , Guang , Wang , Wei , Chen , Yu , Huang , J. P. , Ohashi , Hirotada , Stanley , H. Eugene
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: National Academy of Sciences
Created: 2011
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424
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recordid: faoagrisUS201400069088
title: Herd behavior in a complex adaptive system
format: Article
creator:
  • Zhao , Li
  • Yang , Guang
  • Wang , Wei
  • Chen , Yu
  • Huang , J. P.
  • Ohashi , Hirotada
  • Stanley , H. Eugene
subjects:
  • Resource Allocation
  • Herds
  • Physics
  • Phase Transition
  • Humans
  • Evolution
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011, Vol.108(37), pp.15058-15063
description: In order to survive, self-serving agents in various kinds of complex adaptive systems (CASs) must compete against others for sharing limited resources with biased or unbiased distribution by conducting strategic behaviors. This competition can globally result in the balance of resource allocation. As a result, most of the agents and species can survive well. However, it is a common belief that the formation of a herd in a CAS will cause excess volatility, which can ruin the balance of resource allocation in the CAS. Here this belief is challenged with the results obtained from a modeled resource-allocation system. Based on this system, we designed and conducted a series of computer-aided human experiments including herd behavior. We also performed agent-based simulations and theoretical analyses, in order to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that, as long as the ratio of the two resources for allocation is biased enough, the formation of a typically sized herd can help the system to reach the balanced state. This resource ratio also serves as the critical point for a class of phase transition identified herein, which can be used to discover the role change of herd behavior, from a ruinous one to a helpful one. This work is also of value to some fields, ranging from management and social science, to ecology and evolution, and to physics. ; p. 15058-15063.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00278424
  • 0027-8424
url: Link


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subjectResource Allocation ; Herds ; Physics ; Phase Transition ; Humans ; Evolution
descriptionIn order to survive, self-serving agents in various kinds of complex adaptive systems (CASs) must compete against others for sharing limited resources with biased or unbiased distribution by conducting strategic behaviors. This competition can globally result in the balance of resource allocation. As a result, most of the agents and species can survive well. However, it is a common belief that the formation of a herd in a CAS will cause excess volatility, which can ruin the balance of resource allocation in the CAS. Here this belief is challenged with the results obtained from a modeled resource-allocation system. Based on this system, we designed and conducted a series of computer-aided human experiments including herd behavior. We also performed agent-based simulations and theoretical analyses, in order to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that, as long as the ratio of the two resources for allocation is biased enough, the formation of a typically sized herd can help the system to reach the balanced state. This resource ratio also serves as the critical point for a class of phase transition identified herein, which can be used to discover the role change of herd behavior, from a ruinous one to a helpful one. This work is also of value to some fields, ranging from management and social science, to ecology and evolution, and to physics. ; p. 15058-15063.
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abstractIn order to survive, self-serving agents in various kinds of complex adaptive systems (CASs) must compete against others for sharing limited resources with biased or unbiased distribution by conducting strategic behaviors. This competition can globally result in the balance of resource allocation. As a result, most of the agents and species can survive well. However, it is a common belief that the formation of a herd in a CAS will cause excess volatility, which can ruin the balance of resource allocation in the CAS. Here this belief is challenged with the results obtained from a modeled resource-allocation system. Based on this system, we designed and conducted a series of computer-aided human experiments including herd behavior. We also performed agent-based simulations and theoretical analyses, in order to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that, as long as the ratio of the two resources for allocation is biased enough, the formation of a typically sized herd can help the system to reach the balanced state. This resource ratio also serves as the critical point for a class of phase transition identified herein, which can be used to discover the role change of herd behavior, from a ruinous one to a helpful one. This work is also of value to some fields, ranging from management and social science, to ecology and evolution, and to physics.
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